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Shannach - The Last: Farewell to Mars download epub

by Frank Kelly Freas,Ed Emshwiller,Leigh Brackett


Epub Book: 1636 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1845 kb.

Shannach - The Last book. Grand Master Anne McCaffrey is writing the introduction. The book proudly displays Frank Kelly Freas’ vintage cover art with endpapers by Ed Emshwiller from the original pulp magazines

Shannach - The Last book. The book proudly displays Frank Kelly Freas’ vintage cover art with endpapers by Ed Emshwiller from the original pulp magazines.

The book proudly displays Frank Kelly Freas’ vintage cover art with endpapers by Ed Emshwiller from the original pulp magazines. More from Leigh Brackett. Shannach – The Last: Farewell to Mars – Dinged Copy.

Shannach - The Last: Farewell to Mars. Leigh Brackett was big fan of Robert E. Howard. The first Haffner Press collection, Martian Quest, included some early Brackett fiction wherein the Howard influence was easy to spot

Shannach - The Last: Farewell to Mars. The first Haffner Press collection, Martian Quest, included some early Brackett fiction wherein the Howard influence was easy to spot. The black haired barbarian named Crom who battles the space vampires in The Cube From Space is one of the most obvious examples. This volume finds Brackett at her peak of writing skills.

The collection includes four of her 14 Martian stories, some minor ones, but also vintage stories like The Last Days of Shandakor, originally published in Startling Stories (April 1954). The Road to Sinharat, in Amazing Science Fiction (May 1963), and Purple Princess of the Mad Moon, in Fantasy & Science Fiction (October 1964) are also worth mentioning. To be sure, even the minor stories deserve attention.

The Best of Leigh Brackett (1977), ed. Edmond Hamilton. Shannach–the Last: Farewell to Mars (2011) – Haffner Press. Martian Quest: The Early Brackett (2000) – Haffner Press. The Best of Planet Stories No. 1 (anthology; 1975).

Drawn from the last years of pulp magazines such as Planet Stories, Startling Stories, and Thrilling Wonder Stories, Shannach The Last: Farewell to Mars sees Brackett at the peak of her talents

Eric John Stark] Queen Of the Martian Catacombs.

Venus] Terror Out Of Space. Venus] The Stellar Legion. Venus] The Dragon-Queen Of Venus. Eric John Stark] Queen Of the Martian Catacombs. Venus] The Citadel Of Lost Ships. Mars] The Beast-Jewel Of Mars.

Brackett's novella "The Ark of Mars" was the cover story in the September 1953 issue of Planet . The Best of Leigh Brackett (1977), ed.

Brackett's novella "The Ark of Mars" was the cover story in the September 1953 issue of Planet Stories, illustrated by Kelly Freas. Brackett's novella "Last Call from Sector 9G" was the cover story in the final issue of Planet Stories in 1955, illustrated by Kelly Freas. Short science fiction.

Collection of 17 stories, first published from 1950 to 1974, plus an essay on writing from 1975. This volume includes first drafts, Derleth’s responses, and illustrations by Randy Broecker. The PS Publishing page has a synopsis.

Mars is a dying old world, full of evil tyrants and decaying cities where crime and malevolence run rampant. Eric Stark is an outlaw in this savage world. Orphaned on Mercury and raised by native tribes there, he is hunted by the law, betrayed and wanted by warlords and may hold the fate of Mars in his hands. Leigh Brackett may be best known for her screenplay for "The Empire Strikes Back," but her lush tales of interplanetary adventures were thrilling readers long before "Star Wars.

Description Picking up where Lorelei of the Red Mist: Planetary Romances left off, this volume collects the final 17 stories of strange adventures on other worlds from the undisputed "Queen of Space Opera." Drawn from the last years of pulp magazines such as Planet Stories, Startling Stories, and Thrilling Wonder Stories, Shannach The Last: Farewell to Mars sees Brackett at the peak of her talents. Oddly, it is at this point where she abandons the "planetary romance" sub-genre and embarks on a small string of stories tinged with social relevance. This departure didn't stop editors asking for some of "that old Brackett magic" and she offered up two latter day tales ("The Road to Sinharat" and "Purple Priestess of the Mad Moon") before returning to chronicle further adventures of Eric John Stark in her final "Skaith" novels. Closing out the collection is a trio of tales written on commission from the "king of anthologies," Roger Elwood. The book is adorned with Frank Kelly Freas' and Ed Emshwiller's vintage illustrations from the original pulp magazines. In a review of Lorelei of the Red Mist: Planetary Romances Paul di Filippo says "[Brackett's work] is replete with hard-bitten protagonists with wounded psyches, females both nurturing and malevolent, weird alien life forms, strange planetary environments, danger, treachery, camaraderie and even spiritual epiphanies. In short, this book holds the essence of SF at least, the essence of one very important school of it." Yeah, that's the stuff! Table of Contents "Introduction" by Anne McCaffrey The Truants (Startling Stories Jul 50) The Citadel of Lost Ages (Startling Stories Dec '50) The Woman from Altair (Startling Stories Jul '51) The Shadows (Startling Stories Feb '52) The Last Days of Shandakor (Startling Stories Apr '52) Shannach the Last (Planet Stories Nov '52) Mars Minus Bisha (Planet Stories Jan '54) Runaway (Startling Stories Spr '54) The Tweener (The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction Feb '55) Last Call from Sector 9G (Planet Stories Sum '55) The Queer Ones (Venture Mar '57) All the Colors of the Rainbow (Venture Nov '57) The Road to Sinharat (Amazing Stories May '63) Purple Priestess of the Mad Moon (ss) F&SF Oct '64) Come Sing the Moons of Moravenn (The Other Side of Tomorrow, ed. Roger Elwood, 1973) How Bright the Stars (Flame Tree Planet, ed. Roger Elwood, 1973) Mommies and Daddies (Crisis, ed. Roger Elwood, 1974) "Interview with Leigh Brackett"

Comments: (3)

Awene
Shannach the Last is the final collection of Leigh Brackett short stories - although some are near novella length, really - from Haffner Press. It is itself a gorgeous book, from a striking dustjacket, arresting endpaper art, studily bound, to large readable print. Like all the Haffner stuff, a telephone directory given this treatment would look good. But it is the contents of the book that really shine, which are nicely summarised in the product description above.

This is the last 25 years of Brackett's short stories, from 1950 - 1975. Her distinctive voice is in full flow here, with elements from her love of Westerns and crime fiction showing up all through this "sci-fi" collection. Mostly, the heroes are grizzled, hardbitten and cynical: none are young or even particularly close to it (with one particular exception). There is a mixture of both the inimitable Brackett adventures and softer sci-fi here, with the latter being a new development for Brackett. You can tell which are which largely from the titles - The Tweener, The Runaway, The Truants: all these are more cerebral tales. On the other hand, the titles of the rip-roaring storytelling are also a giveaway - "The Woman from Altair", "Last Call from Sector 9G" etc.

All of these stories are good in the various ways, for all that I do prefer the adventures, and think Brackett is at her best writing those. But then I remember reading the Tweener and doubt that conclusion. Many of the adventures tales - at least those from the 50's - truly ache with loss and sadness, and are powerfully written. Exotic locations all around the solar system - and beyond - are described in such a way as to fill your mind's eye. The description of The Hub in "9G" is not only perfect, but seems to have captured every depiction of Coruscant in the Star Wars universe: strange to think that perhaps this story ended up having a greater impact on Star Wars than the first draft script for Empire that was Brackett's final work.

"Purple Priestess" is a Brackett adventure told as a horror story, and makes me wish Brackett had tried to write a little more horror to see what happened. Its an interesting diversion from the main thrust of Brackett's work. Also interesting to note is that in the pure sci-fi tales the dystopian worlds are often bleaker and more miserable than even the poorest slum in the planetary adventure realm: Jekkara on Mars may be dirty and dangerous, but it seems to bustle with life: the settings of Runaway, Mommies and Daddies, and even the unseen Earth of "Moons of Moravenn" are washed out imitations of civilisation by comparison.

The book ends with a 1975 interview with the author, which is both a time capsule of the day and an interesting look behind the scenes.

Really, you should buy this book, and Martian Quest and Lorelei also. Its worth it.

EDIT: Somehow this review of the Haffner Press hardback has been attached to the kindle 99c single story of the same name. Its still a good story, but dont think the review above applies in full!
Kefym
Shannach- The Last

WARNING: This ebook (at the time of this post) is NOT the same as the print book that appears in the same amazon listing. The print book ("Shannach - The Last: Farewell to Mars") is 588 pages long and includes an array of short stories and novellas. The kindle ebook claiming to be the same product contains ONLY the single novella "Shannach - The Last", and none of the other published works.
Sadaron above the Gods
A friend of mine who loves science fiction told me I should read some Leigh Brackett stories. I started with Shannach and was very pleased. This story is from a time when imagination was far more important than the science. Sci-fi stories now seem to be so worried about totally accurate science facts and often the story takes a back seat. Leigh Brackett tells a fun story and the last line in the story is like a wonderful poem. I will read more of her stories and encourage others to give her a try.
Shannach - The Last: Farewell to Mars download epub
Author: Frank Kelly Freas,Ed Emshwiller,Leigh Brackett
ISBN: 1893887448
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: Haffner Press; First Hardcover edition (October 17, 2011)
Pages: 588 pages