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Oyster : The Story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service download epub

by William Pinwill,Ian MacPhee,Brian Toohey


Epub Book: 1933 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1767 kb.

Authors Brian Toohey and William Pinwill made claims, in their 1989 book titled Oyster: The Story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service that the Australian Secret Intelligence Service (ASIS) acquired the Department of Navy portion in 1961 for a training facility, none of which.

Authors Brian Toohey and William Pinwill made claims, in their 1989 book titled Oyster: The Story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service that the Australian Secret Intelligence Service (ASIS) acquired the Department of Navy portion in 1961 for a training facility, none of which have ever been substantiated. Years before publishing the book, in 1983, SIAD provided training to a covert action. paramilitary ASIS program started that year, for ASIS officers and ASIS recruited civilian trainees, to establish a team to recover Australians held by terrorists overseas

Read by Brian Toohey.

Read by Brian Toohey.

Brian Toohey and William Pinwill, Oyster: The story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service, Heinemann .

Brian Toohey and William Pinwill, Oyster: The story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service, Heinemann, Melbourne, 1989, p. 288. ^ Toohey and Pinwill, op. ci. pp. 291–292. Richard Farmer, 'School for Aust. spies: Top-Secret Espionage Ring Exposed', The Daily Telegraph, 1 November 1972.

Brookes lobbied the Menzies government to set up an intelligence organisation in Australia similar to MI6 . Brian Toohey and William Pinwill, Oyster: The story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service 1989.

Brookes lobbied the Menzies government to set up an intelligence organisation in Australia similar to MI6 (the Secret Intelligence Service in the United Kingdom) He named a street "Brookes Street" in Point Lonsdale, Victoria, when he subdivided land which had belonged to his father, Herbert Brookes, into a housing estate.

Redirected from Alfred Brookes). Alfred Deakin Brookes (11 April 1920 – 19 June 2005) was the first head of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service, the intelligence agency of the Australian government that collects foreign intelligence

Redirected from Alfred Brookes). Alfred Deakin Brookes (11 April 1920 – 19 June 2005) was the first head of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service, the intelligence agency of the Australian government that collects foreign intelligence. He was appointed in 1952 by Robert Menzies the prime minister at that time. Brookes was the son of Ivy (née Deakin) and Herbert Brookes.

Brian Toohey and Marian Wilkinson, The book of leaks: exposes in defence of the public's right to know (1987). Brian Toohey and William Pinwill, Oyster: the story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service (1989). Brian Toohey, Tumbling dice: the story of modern economic policy (1994). Resources and articles. Related Sourcewatch articles. php?title Brian Toohey&oldid 440054".

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780855612504.

Brian Toohey and William Pinwill, Oyster: The story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service, Heinemann, Melbourne, 1989, p.

Oyster : the story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service, Brian Toohey, William Pinwill

Oyster : the story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service, Brian Toohey, William Pinwill. Oyster : the story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service, Brian Toohey, William Pinwill. Kie Daudai : notes and sketches from Cape York, Edwina Toohey. The book of leaks : exposes in defence of the public's right to know, Brian Toohey, Marian Wilkinson. All users of the catalogue should also be aware that certain words, terms or descriptions may be culturally sensitive and may be considered inappropriate today, but may have reflected the author's/creator's attitude or that of the period in which they were written.


Comments: (2)

Virtual
This book is an unofficial history from 1949 to 1989 of ASIS - the Australian Secret Intelligence Service - also known by its code name of MO9. The authors are experienced investigative journalists but not sensationalists; this is a very sober account. They had (unauthorised) access to the secret evidence and findings of the Royal Commission into the intelligence services of Justice Hope and to the secret history of ASIS prepared for the Royal Commission as well as numerous interviews with past and serving ASIS staff. When they learned of plans to publish the book the government of the day obtained an injunction against the authors and the book was only allowed to be published after numerous sections that related to operational matters were removed.

What remains is a history of ASIS in chronological order from its foundation to 1989, with all major operations explained and numerous insights into its activities. This is a valuable book because although today ASIS openly advertises for staff and has its own web page it is still a very secretive organisation, even more so in the past when even newly elected prime ministers did not know of its existence until they took office.

One discovery is how few friends ASIS had in government at all levels. Only one prime minister had any use for it. Menzies ignored it except to sack its first director, Holt was initially enthusiastic but later went cool towards it, Gorton thought the intelligence it gathered was trivial, McMahon described its product as "bar room gossip" and sacked its director, Whitlam thought it was out of control and sacked the director, Fraser was enthusiastic but put the broom through, Hawke thought it a waste of time but cynically kept it operating to show the US government that Australia was a loyal ally. More importantly Sir Arthur Tange as head of the public service was an implacable enemy. It did not help that some of ASIS' directors were distinctly eccentric.

Most political and economic intelligence is collected by diplomats in the normal course of their activities, Defence has a good network of military attaches and the Defence Signals Directorate produces world class sigint. Business people and academics also contribute material. Compared with these, ASIS' contributions are quite small.

There were some successes - a series of good networks in Cambodia and finding KGB penetration of Indonesia's BAKIN, but there have been significant failures to predict important regional events including the expulsion of Singapore from Malaysia and Siteveni Rabuka's Fiji coup.

All three directors who were sacked were accused of insubordination and exceeding their authority, usually by running operations that were not approved and indeed were contrary to government policy. There are numerous examples of this. When Sihanouk expelled the CIA from Cambodia, ASIS took over CIA networks, but Australia policy was to support Sihanouk while US policy was to undermine him (and when he was overthrown his incompetent successors were themselves overthrown by the Khmer Rouge). In Chile Australia supported the Allende government and opposed Pinochet's coup but ASIS passed on the names of pro-democracy dissidents to the CIA. At one stage ASIS supported the OPM guerrillas in West Papua - no matter how noble the cause this was still against government policy.

The authors question why ASIS still trains officers in "special operations" when, unlike the CIA, it does not engage in paramilitary activity or assassinations. They suggest that this type of action is best left to the SAS and give some examples of ludicrous training incidents that posed a real threat to the public.

Some questions they raise may never be answered. Was Dick Ellis, who MI6 sent to oversee the establishment of ASIS, a Soviet agent? He had certainly been turned by the Nazis and within the British intelligence establishment was widely suspected of treason. How close are ASIS agents to organised crime, especially given that it has the responsibility of collecting intelligence on transnational crime? How divided were ASIS officers' loyalties, when they referred to ASIS HQ as "main office" and MI6 HQ as "head office"? This was a period when Britain turned to Europe and dumped its "East of Suez" responsibilities and connections. Is ASIS still a stronghold of monarchists and Anglophiles? Were they in touch with mainstream political thought in Australia given that so many officers were members of the Melbourne Club and other bastions of Establishment privilege?

For the student of Australia's intelligence agencies and government history, this book is essential.
Fordrekelv
This book says it was censored to some degree before publication.

A book that looks at the formation of ASIS, and the political decisions and masters behind it. It points out that it is not legislated for, and looks at its role and the problems that it has had, as well as its rise to prominence after it was admitted that it exists.
Oyster : The Story of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service download epub
Author: William Pinwill,Ian MacPhee,Brian Toohey
ISBN: 1863300260
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: Mandarin (1990)
Pages: 322 pages