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Web Between The World download epub

by Charles Sheffield


Epub Book: 1332 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1371 kb.

Sheffield Charles Anyone reading our two books will quickly see that the parallels were dictated by. .Charles Sheffield and I have just scratched the surface.

The Web Between the Worlds by Charles Sheffield For Linda An open letter to the Bulletin of the Science Fiction Writers of America Early in 1979 I published a novel, The Fountains of Paradise, in which an engineer named Morgan, builder of the longest bridge in the world, tackles a far more ambitious project - an orbital tower extending from a point on the equator to geostationary orbit. Anyone reading our two books will quickly see that the parallels were dictated by the fundamental mechanics of the subject - though in one major respect we evolved totally different solutions.

CHAPTER 12. t the quiet limit of the world, a white-haired shadow roaming like a dream.

Надеемся, Вы провели время с удовольствием! Поделитесь, пожалуйста, своими впечатлениями: Оставить отзыв. Оглавление: An open letter to the Bulletin of the Science Fiction Writers of America. CHAPTER 12. 36. CHAPTER 13: The Masters of Atlantis.

Before he died, he was writing a column for the Baen Books web site; his last column concerned the discovery of the brain tumour that led to his death.

His novel The Web Between the Worlds, featuring the construction of a space elevator, was published almost simultaneously with Arthur C. Clarke's novel on the subject, The Fountains of Paradise, a coincidence that amused them both. Excerpts from both Sheffield's The Web Between the Worlds and Clarke's The Fountains of Paradise have appeared recently in a space elevator anthology Towering Yarns. Before he died, he was writing a column for the Baen Books web site; his last column concerned the discovery of the brain tumour that led to his death.

Well, Charles Sheffield (currently President of the American Astronautical Association and V/P of the Earth Satellite Corporation) only missed by a few months with his Ace novel The Web Between the Worlds.

with Charles Sheffield, as with Robert Forward, you get amazingly intricate, well-fleshed-out scientific speculation along with completely two-dimensional, boring characters

with Charles Sheffield, as with Robert Forward, you get amazingly intricate, well-fleshed-out scientific speculation along with completely two-dimensional, boring characters. might start with the heritage series rather than this though, for sheffield.

Charles Sheffield (1935 - 2002) Charles Sheffield, born in the UK in 1935, graduated from St John's College Cambridge with a Double First in Mathematics and Physics

Charles Sheffield (1935 - 2002) Charles Sheffield, born in the UK in 1935, graduated from St John's College Cambridge with a Double First in Mathematics and Physics. Moving to the USA in the mid 1960's, he began working in the field of particle physics which lead to a consultancy with NASA and landed him the position of chief scientist at the Earth Satellite Corporation. Best known for writing hard SF, his career as a successful science fiction writer began in response to his grief over the loss of his first wife to cancer in 1977; Sheffield has been awarded both the Hugo and Nebula.

The Web Between the Worlds. Author: Charles Sheffield. Publisher: Simon & Shuster, New York, 2001. Rob Merlin was the best engineer who had ever lived

The Web Between the World. has been added to your Cart. Charles Sheffield (1935-2002) was a mathematician and theoretical physicist by training. His doctoral work was on Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity.

The Web Between the World. Dr. Sheffield worked as chief scientist for the Earth Satellite Corporation, a Washington, . based firm that specializes in the analysis of data gathered from space. The author of many science fiction novels, including "Cold as Ice" and "The Ganymede Club" from Tor, Sheffield lived in Silver Spring, Maryland, with his wife, author Nancy Kress.

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"WHAT SF SHOULD BE ALL ABOUT." -- Kliatt

Rob Merlin was the best engineer who had ever lived. That was why "The King of Space" had to have him for the most spectacular construction project ever -- even though Rob was a potentially fatal threat to his power...

Thus begins a breakthrough novel by the former President of the American Astronautical Society, about an idea whose time has come: a shimmering bridge between Earth and space that mankind will climb to the stars!

Sound like fantasy? The concept has been in the literature of physics for over three decades, but only a writer with the scientific background of a Sheffield or a Clarke could bring the idea to life.


Comments: (7)

Jek
This book was a Christmas Present when I was a Junior/Senior in High School.. It became one of my favorite books. Having moved a lot over the years for my career, the book has been lost. I was thrilled when I came across it on Amazon. If you like Sci Fi that isn't that far fetched and could find a practical application in our lifetime, then this book is a must. It has it all, suspense, murder, plots, money, and much more.
Brakree
Rob Merlyn is one of the best engineers who has lived - mostly because he had the good luck not to die yet. So he is asked to help make a space elevator. This is classical WE Have To Get Into Space kind of novels that ruled supreme in the 60's and 70's. Add a few interesting settings, add a giant squid, some high tech science, and you have what is a very interesting universe. But is it a good story? Well, yeah, it is exciting and fun to read, which is the norm from such a writer of Charles Sheffield's skill and ability. And much of the science makes it a somewhat HARD science fiction story. But there seem to be long periods where nobody does anything but talk which CAN slow the plot down. Worth a read but I doubt you will reread it again and again, maybe once every few years? Still, worth a first read, so get it new or used. If you found the topic interesting may I suggest Liftport - The Space Elevator: Opening Space to Everyone
Tat
Some good info on building a space elevator complete with mad industrialist with more money than god. There are misc other subplots though which were completely unecessary and uninteresting. Worth reading at a used price but not full retail.
Jark
"mybluemake" says in his review that "Charles Sheffield is (or was) actually pulitzer prize winning author James Kirkwood." I don't think that that's true. Sheffield did use "James Kirkwood" as a pen-name a few times, but there's another author of that name who did win a Pulitzer for "A Chorus Line" and died in 1989. Sheffield died in 2002.

As for the book itself, GREAT. However, it was wrong about how the Space Elevator will be built. It'll be a thin ribbon a meter wide and the thickness of saran wrap, not a cylinder the size of a Sequoia. Not a big deal, as far as the story goes.
Light out of Fildon
As Charles Fort might have said, "It's space elevator time when it's space elevator time." And 1979 was space elevator time in science fiction. Besides this novel, Arthur C. Clarke's Fountains of Paradise was published that year. Clarke's introduction to this novel makes it clear Sheffield came up with the idea independently.

There's plenty of what science fiction critic John J. Pierce called "industrial science fiction" here. It includes not only our hero Rob Merlyn, an engineer who specializes in building massive bridges on Earth, discusseing the project with his client Darius Regula, the Rocket King of the solar system, but a whole chapter describing the tethering of the space elevator.

But, since this is Sheffield, there's a whole other story going on besides building that elevator. The novel starts out with the murder of Rob's parents, the downing of an airliner by a bomb, and Rob being birthed on an Antarctica ice sheet. To that, add a bit of spacebound Gothic with Darius' watery habitat Atlantis with a squid in space (long before Stephen Baxter did it) and a sinister scientist Morel, reports of "goblins", and Rob's attraction to Darius' assistant Cornelia - complicated by her amnesiac, drug addict mother. Throw in some set pieces like a trip to Way Down, a restaurant far below the surface of Earth, and the asteroid mining accident that made Darius a rich - but very photophobic - man, and you have a suspenseful story full of hard science with a bit of the feeling of Alfred Bester and Charles Harness about it.

Take note, this is the first version of the novel. Sheffield expanded it later on with The Web Between The Worlds
Arryar
It doesn't take a rocket scientist to notice that burning vast quantities of combustible fuel to move an object from here out into orbit, let alone out into the solar system, is phenomenally expensive and dangerous. Science Fiction authors have, for decades, tried to come up with all manner of workarounds, from gravitation drives to Star Trek style transporters.
One proposal that, until the late seventies, didn't attract a lot of attention was the idea of a cable stretching from the Earth into space, held in place by some form of geosynchronous structure. It's probably the least sexy technology available, nothing more than a really, really, strong, long, cable with objects climbing up and down it using whatever means fit the designer's imagination.
Two science fiction authors, Arthur C. Clarke and Charles Sheffield, decided to raise the idea of such a cable at roughly the same time (Clarke's book, The Fountains of Paradise, was published two weeks before Sheffield's), and at once the obvious simplicity and advantages of the idea captured the public imagination. Well, sort of, currently there is no known material strong enough to withstand the tension a useful cable would carry, but we're probably not far off.
This book is a treat. As well as the story itself, mostly a thriller centered around an engineer (who builds the cable, 'natch), a billionaire solar system miner, and a dubious amoral biologist, the book comes with a contribution from Arthur C Clarke on the history of the how the idea was brought to press, and a long appendix detailing the physics involved in building a "beanstalk" (Sheffield's name for the thing.) It was this part I personally found most interesting - it covered how such a thing would be built, other designs centered around the same principle, advantages the cable would have such as the ability to slingshot ships from the end, using the Earth's own rotation to move objects to anywhere in the solar system.
The novel itself is a multi-layered story which is centered so much around a sub-plot that the beanstalk itself is almost an afterthought. In a pinch, Merlin, the main character, investigates the death of his parents and why they were murdered, after the new project he's hired to lead unexpectedly brings him into contact with people who were involved or knew the reasons. The Science in the Fiction includes the beanstalk (obviously), genetic engineering, the mining of asteroids and other trips around the solar system. About my only grouse is that the characters are a little wooden and come across in that kind of pseudo-machismo usually associated with salesman culture and office politics, something that ought not to have irritated me to the extent that it did.
A wonderful book though, proposing a wonderful idea that, if ever implemented, will probably mean more for mankind's eventual exploration of space than the moon landings themselves.
Web Between The World download epub
Author: Charles Sheffield
ISBN: 0441878628
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: Ace (August 1, 1979)