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Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years 1963-65 download epub

by Taylor Branch


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From Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch, the second part of his epic trilogy on the American Civil Rights Movement.

From Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch, the second part of his epic trilogy on the American Civil Rights Movement. In the second volume of his three-part history, a monumental trilogy that began with Parting the Waters, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award, Taylor Branch portrays the Civil Rights Movement at its zenith, recounting the climactic struggles as they commanded the national stage. PILLAR OF FIRE: America in the King Years, 1963-1965. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus.

Timeline of a Trilogy By 1963, America is a nation in growing turmoil. Segregation of the races is still the law of the Deep South, and an unwritten code in much of the rest of the country.

Timeline of a Trilogy. Taylor Branch's America in the King Years series is both a biography of Martin Luther King and a history of his age. No timeline can do justice to its wide cast of characters and its intricate web of incident, but here are some of the highlights, which might be useful as a scorecard to the trilogy's nearly 3,000 pages. Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63. By 1963, America is a nation in growing turmoil. African Americans are deprived of basic rights in all aspects of their lives.

King’s commitment to nonviolence in the fa The second volume of Taylor Branch’s towering trilogy about Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Civil Rights movement covers so many momentous events, such as the assassinations of John Kennedy and Malcolm X, the Mississippi Freedom Summer, King’s Nobel Prize, and America’s entry into Vietnam, that it is difficult to believe that. it spans a mere two years that also witnessed the exodus of black America from the Republican party to the Democratic.

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America in the King Years is a three-volume history of Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement by Taylor Branch, which he wrote between 1982 and 2006. The three individual volumes have won a variety of awards, including the 1989 Pulitzer Prize for History

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Читайте Pillar of Fire (автор: Taylor Branch) бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного периода. Читайте книги и аудиокниги без ограничений в веб-браузере или на устройствах iPad, iPhone и Android. From Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch, the second part of his epic trilogy on the American Civil Rights Movement. Until then, be grateful for two-thirds of a monument. R. Z. Sheppard, Time.

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America in the King Years. Simon & Schuster. The second volume in Taylor Branch's award-winning trilogy about the Civil Rights era covers the muddled years between 1963 and 1965, focusing specifically on Malcolm X, the Civil Rights Bill of 1964, Freedom Summer in Mississippi in 1964, and Martin Luther King's receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964. From these topics, it becomes clear that the narrative is chronologically muddled as the narrative is more thematic than Branch's first volume, Parting the Waters.


Comments: (7)

Flash_back
Today not everyone knows how hated Martin Luther King and the entire civil rights movement were. Practically all politicians pay lip service to King. There’s a national holiday, although people forget that it took strikes on that day by Black workers and then demonstrations to win that. Now that’s it’s been won, it’s often treated as another day off, not a day of struggle. Malcolm X was even more hated, but even he has become acceptable—Manning Marable’s book tries to present Malcolm X in the image of the author—an opportunistic social democrat. At least he admits that Malcolm X refused to support the Democratic (or Republican) Party.

Taylor Branch writes quite accurately about Malcolm X in this volume, as his story becomes intertwined with the story of SNCC, and to some extent even Martin Luther King. All the biographies of Malcolm X have serious problems--I recommend two books which don’t pretend to be biographies but have a lot to say about him—Last Year of Malcolm X: The Evolution of a Revolutionary, and Malcolm X, Black Liberation, and the Road to Workers Power. And then there are the books of his speeches from his last year, starting with Malcolm X Speaks: Selected Speeches and Statements and By Any Means Necessary (Malcolm X Speeches and Writings) (Malcolm X speeches & writings).

While a few sections of the book seemed a bit slow, for the most part Taylor Branch maintains the same high quality hard-to-put down excitement as in the first volume. He revisits the “Battle of Birmingham” again, from different points of view, and it’s wonderful, but for still more some readers may want to pick up Carry Me Home: Birmingham, Alabama: The Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution, another great account.

Jim Crow segregation was smashed by a mass movement, but institutional racism remains, including segregation in housing, mass incarceration, likelihood of being arrested or shot dead by a cop while being unarmed, and so on. If the gap in earning levels has fallen, it's because the working class as a whole is being driven down, not because of gains Black workers have made. Equality in misery was obviously not the goal of those who marched for civil rights.

Many liberals have convinced themselves that the election of Trump is because white workers who had twice voted for Obama suddenly became racist, I recommend The Clintons' Anti-Working-Class Record (Why Washington fears working people?). The working class has not become more racist; it is having second thoughts about the Democrats because of the world capitalist economic and social crisis. There were, I believe 201 counties where people who had twice voted for Obama voted for Trump. The fact that their lifespan is 20 years less than the US average seems far more relevant than their attitude toward Black people, which probably hasn’t changed. And the arrogant elitism of Hillary Clinton pushed them to vote for what they thought was “the lesser evil.”

But every strike, every demonstration against cop brutality or for abortion rights is more important than the personality contest that’s called an election. I also recommend Are They Rich Because They're Smart?: Class, Privilege and Learning Under Capitalism, and Is Socialist Revolution in the Us Possible?: A Necessary Debate Among Working People

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There one minor error in the book, which should be corrected. Branch writes of “the white supremacist government, which was defying Britain’s grant of independence to the colony of Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe).” The problem really was that this colony declared a “unilateral declaration of independence” in 1965, to maintain white supremacy.
Ceroelyu
The second volume of Taylor Branch’s towering trilogy about Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Civil Rights movement covers so many momentous events, such as the assassinations of John Kennedy and Malcolm X, the Mississippi Freedom Summer, King’s Nobel Prize, and America’s entry into Vietnam, that it is difficult to believe that it spans a mere two years that also witnessed the exodus of black America from the Republican party to the Democratic.

King’s commitment to nonviolence in the face of overwhelming provocation is stunning. Branch often embeds events in an avalanche of detail about day-to-day goings-on that can be somewhat deadening but serves to make the point that there was no inevitability to the ultimate triumph of King. Throughout his career, he was beset by criticism, rivalry, and divisiveness from both within and without his ranks. The forces arrayed against him were formidable. This book is one more argument toward solidifying J. Edgar Hoover’s status as one of the great villains of modern American history, with his underhanded and unconstitutional persecution and surveillance of King, even, at one point, sinking to the depths of having evidence of his infidelities sent to him along with a message urging him to commit suicide. Lyndon Johnson emerges as a pivotal figure, ever mindful of political reality but favorable toward black suffrage in a way that Kennedy wasn’t.

Writing in the early days of the Trump administration, I am reminded by this book that the most worrisome terrorists are the homegrown variety and encouraged by the precedent of citizens standing up to corrupt power and prevailing.
Arthunter
"Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years, 1963-65" is the second volume of Taylor Branch's magisterial three-volume biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. First published in 1998, this masterful book picks up the story of King and the American civil rights movement right where "Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-1963" - the first volume of this trilogy - leaves off.

By 1963, America is a nation in growing turmoil. Segregation of the races is still the law of the Deep South, and an unwritten code in much of the rest of the country. African Americans are deprived of basic rights in all aspects of their lives. They can't vote, and they are denied access to equal opportunities for employment, education, housing, economic advancement and the use of public facilities. There is a rising tide of discontent among African Americans; they are becoming less willing to remain silent in their demands for equality, and more willing to fight...

During the two-year period covered in "Pillar of Fire," some of the most important battles for equal rights are fought at Birmingham, Alabama; Greenwood, Mississippi; St. Augustine, Florida; and other places throughout the United States. Branch points out that by this time, Martin Luther King, Jr. has become the de facto leader of America's civil rights movement. Although he holds no "official" leadership position, he is, in effect, the voice and face of equal rights for all people of color. This is mainly due to his courage in speaking out, his commitment to non-violent confrontation to achieve equal rights, and his willingness to endure physical dangers and hardships along with those who march for freedom and equality.

In "Pillar of Fire," Martin Luther King, Jr. is once again presented as the flawed but noble hero at the center of the epic battle for civil rights. Like its predecessor, "Parting the Waters," this book is a fabulously written, highly detailed account of a man and an era. It's a perfect combination of a brilliant biography and a penetrating study of one the most disturbing but important periods of twentieth century American history. Most highly recommended.
Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years 1963-65 download epub
Humanities
Author: Taylor Branch
ISBN: 1439502099
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English