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A Reference Grammar of Spoken Tamil (Reference Grammars) download epub

by Harold F. Schiffman


Epub Book: 1238 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1128 kb.

The book has benefited from extensive native-speaker input and the author's own long experience of teaching Tamil to English-speakers.

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The book has benefitted from extensive native-speaker input and the author's own long experience of teaching Tamil to English-speakers.

Издательство: University of Washington Press. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Издательство: University of Washington Press. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. A chorus of cranes : the cranes of North America and the world. Johnsgard, Paul . Mangelsen, Thomas D. Год: 2015.

The spoken variety is radically different from the standard literary variety, last standardized in the thirteenth century.

This is a brand new book at a great price.

A Reference Grammar of Spoken Tamil (Reference Grammars) by Harold Schiffman is ready for immediate shipment to any location. This is a brand new book at a great price. Author Harold Schiffman. Publication Year 2006. Publisher Cambridge University Press.

The book has benefited from extensive native-speaker input and the author's own long experience of teaching Tamil to English-speakers.

This is a reference grammar of the standard spoken variety of Tamil, which differs radically from the literary language. This book, a much expanded version of the author's Grammar of Spoken Tamil (1979) is the first such grammar to contain examples both in Tamil script and in transliteration, and is designed to be accessible to students studying the modern spoken language at all levels as well as to linguists and other specialists. The book has benefited from extensive native-speaker input and the author's own long experience of teaching Tamil to English-speakers.

Comments: (3)

Llanonte
Disclosures: I'm a native Tamilian with bilingual proficiency in Spoken Tamil (ST) and English. I have a little formal training in linguistics and phonetics at the university level plus second language proficiency in bunch of other languages. I was raised in a Tamil expat household (accounts for proficiency in ST) but didn't attend a school which offered classes in literate Tamil (LT). I bought this book because I wanted to become literate in Tamil and understand the differences between the ST and LT.

I've read the first few chapters so far. I think the following are the prerequisites for finding this book useful:
1. Introductory knowledge of phonetics and linguistics equivalent to most high school or first year university course. If you can read the IPA (the fragment of it required to describe most romance languages) and have done some basic exercises to understand the relationships between various phonemes, you know enough.
2. Intermediate knowledge of grammar in at least one language. The author shows a weak preferences for grammatical terminology used to describe latin in English. My English grammar classes in school were a joke, and most of my formal knowledge of grammar comes from French (which uses different terminology in several places). I was still able to follow with relative ease.
3. Basic ability to read and write Tamil script, plus basic knowledge of common Tamil phrases. The book primarily communicates through English, but lists Tamil words and phrases in Tamil script and romanized form, to illustrate the phonetics of both LT and ST variants. So, if you have learned some Tamil from a phrase book and are beginning to wonder why the written stuff sounds so different from what you hear in a movie, that's a great place to start consulting this book.

If you don't meet the above 3 prerequisites, you might yet get some value from this book depending on the extent of training you may have in other languages and the extent to which those languages are related to dravidian languages. But there's a chance that you find the material too dense and dry to learn well from it.

So far, I've been very impressed with how accurately this book has captured the variants of ST (to the extent that I'm aware of through Tamil media and interactions with my family). The book describes a "consensus" form of the language as you are very likely to hear spoken by native speakers in many cities in Tamil Nadu (TN) in street conversation, in TV and radio programming, in professional and educational contexts, as well as in TN Tamil emigré households spanning from America to Singapore. If you understand this consensus form of ST, you can understand and make yourself intelligible to the vast majority of native TN speakers.

The author may occasionally cite examples of dialects that diverge from the "consensus" ST, but successfully avoids falling into a minefield of comprehensively surveying all the dialects and regionalisms of the language. (you don't really need to understand the intricacies of cockney dialects to successfully use English in most places, right?)
Matty
This is a spectacularly well done book. ***However, this is not a beginner's book.*** It includes charts and diagrams, is very nicely organized, but generally assumes that you already have an understanding of Tamil before you begin. After having studied for a few months, I can go back to it and look up rules and questions I have.

It would work best as a reference (as it says in the title) in conjunction with a Tamil learning textbook.

Luckily, both google books and professor Harold Schiffman's current university web page have much of the text online, so you can take a look before you buy.

If you were interested in studying the linguistic side of the Tamil language, this is the book for you.
lucky kitten
This book delivers what the title suggests, namely that it is a "reference" grammar for spoken Tamil. Professor Schiffman takes a linguist's structured approach to the language, with detailed descriptions of parts of speech, declension of nouns, and conjugation of verbs, and idioms in sentence structure.

As an adult learner, Prof Schiffman's book is a useful part of one's collection as a reference. I would recommend purchasing the book along with 1-2 other "learning" textbooks, such as Asher and Annamalai's Colloquial Tamil: The Complete Course for Beginners (Colloquial Series) or Hart's Tamil for Beginners. I would also recommend the University of Pennsylvania website, "Tamil Language in Context" to any adult Tamil learner.
A Reference Grammar of Spoken Tamil (Reference Grammars) download epub
Humanities
Author: Harold F. Schiffman
ISBN: 0521027527
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; Reissue edition (November 2, 2006)
Pages: 256 pages