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History of United States Naval Operations in World War II. Vol. 5: The Struggle for Guadalcanal, August 1942-February 1943 download epub

by Samuel Eliot Morison


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Samuel Eliot Morison wrote many popular and award-winning books on maritime history. The resultant six month struggles and battles are what are told in this fifth volume of the History of the .

Samuel Eliot Morison wrote many popular and award-winning books on maritime history. He was the recipient of two Pulitzer Prizes, two Bancroft Prizes, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Series: History of the United States Naval Operations in World War II. Paperback: 480 pages. Navy in World War 2. As is usual with Morison's writings, the way he chooses to describe the events and the battles is very exciting and clear. This is not an emotionless recitation of facts, figures, and dates.

History of US Naval Operations in WWII 5: Struggle for Guadalcanal 8/42-2/43. As usual, I'll just point out some of the highlights of this fascinating book. On August 8, 1942, Americans learned that their troops had invaded Guadalcanal. During the next four months, the area was the scene of six major naval engagements and over fifty ship-to-ship and air-sea fights. When the Japanese took over the Melanesian area, they paid the natives in occupation shillings. The Marines on Guadalcanal had a number of t Part of the History of United States Naval Operations in World War II.

2. Operations in North African waters, October 1942-June 1943. and submarine actions, May 1942-August 1942. 5. The struggle for Guadalcanal, August 1942-February 1943.

1. The Battle of the Atlantic, September 1939-May 1943. 2. 3. The Rising Sun in the Pacific, 1931-April 1942. 4. Coral Sea, Midway and submarine actions, May 1942-August 1942. 6. Breaking the Bismarcks barrier, 22 July 1942-1 May 1944. 7. Aleutians, Gilberts and Marshalls, June 1942-April 1944. 8. New Guinea and the Marianas, March 1944-August 1944. 9. Sicily, Salerno, Anzio, January 1943-June 1944.

Struggle for Guadalcanal, August, 1942-February, 1943. By (author) Samuel Eliot Morison. Free delivery worldwide. The present volume, the third on the war in the Pacific, is devoted entirely to the Guadalcanal campaign, in which the United States Navy experienced more fighting than in the three previous wars. After a brief description of the Solomon Islands, the author launches forth into the Battle of Savo Island

Naval Institute provides an independent forum for those who seek to advance and strengthen the naval profession. History of United States Naval Operations in World War II, Volume 5. By Samuel Eliot Morison. Subject: General Military & Naval History World War II .

Naval Institute provides an independent forum for those who seek to advance and strengthen the naval profession.

Samuel Eliot Morison, John Lundstrom. The Struggle for Guadacanal, August 1942�February 1943, Volume 5 in the series, covers the six major engagements in the waters surrounding Guadalcanal, in which the . Navy experienced more fighting than in any three previous wars. From the Solomon Islands campaign to the courageous actions of Edson's Raiders at the Battle of the Bloody Ridge and the Battle of Tassafaronga, the author describes events from the ship decks, cockpits, and ridgetops where the fate of thousands was decided.

Morison supplements his firsthand experience of American operations . In 1942, Morison was commissioned by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to write a history of . naval operations in World War II and given the rank of lieutenant commander

In 1942, Morison was commissioned by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to write a history of . naval operations in World War II and given the rank of lieutenant commander. The 15 volumes of his History of United States Naval Operations in World War II appeared between 1947 and 1962. A product of the Brahmin tradition, Morison wrote about Bostonians and other New Englanders and about life in early Massachusetts.

5. v. The two-ocean war, a short history of the United States Navy in the Second World War, Samuel Eliot Morison.

Appointed as the official naval historian of the war, Morison was given permission to go anywhere and see all the official records of the war. For this volume, he visted Guadalcanal soon after its secure by the Americans, talked with its commanders, walked the battlefields, interrogated Japanese leaders after the war and read offical battle reports and diaries from both sides of the conflict. Despite its official nature, the book is surprisingly readable.

During the six months covered by volume five of Samuel Eliot Morison's magnificent history, the United States Navy fought six major engagements in waters surrounding Guadalcanal, more bitter and bloody than any naval battle in American history since 1814. From the Solomon Islands campaigns to the courageous action of Edson's Raiders at the Battle of the Bloody Ridge, from the great three-day Naval Battle of Guadalcanal to the Battle of Tassafaronga, Morison describes the events of these excruciating months in thrilling, heartbreaking detail from the shipdecks, cockpits, and exposed ridgetops where the fate of thousands of soldiers and sailors was decided.

"You may search the seven seas in vain for an ocean graveyard with the bones of so many ships and sailors as that body of water between Guadalcanal, Savo, and Florida Islands which our bluejackets named Ironbottom Sound," writes Morison. His account of the action is both harrowing and inspiring, an insider's tribute to those who made Guadalcanal the proving ground of their resourcefulness, tenacity, and courage.


Comments: (7)

Hǻrley Quinn
It is time to return our attention to the war against the submarines in the Atlantic. This tenth volume of the series does just that and covers the period from May 1943 until the end of the war throughout the Atlantic Ocean, with small sidetrips to the Indian Ocean and Mediterranean for completeness. This volume concludes the story of World War 2 Submarine warfare.

I found this volume to be one of the weakest in the series that I have read so far. The first chapter speaks of the organizational changes that the U.S. Navy made in attempting to deal with the U-Boat menace, and the next couple spoke about some of the technical developments that allowed the U.S. Navy to start locating the submarines and hunt them more effectively. Once you are past these chapter the rest of the book devolved into a series of anecdotes detailing how various submarines were detected, where they operated, and what how it was destroyed. While a few of those kinds of anecdotes would be interesting to read, one of my complaints about this book is that it is chock full of episode after episode of the same kind of action. After the first twenty or thirty, I lost interest.

Another major problem with this book is that it gives all the credit for the continual discovery of the submarines to the High Frequency Direction Finding equipment that the U.S. Navy deployed. While I am sure that this equipment played a large role, it seems very suspicious as to how it was able to vector hunter-killer groups to areas where multiple submarines intended to converge, even before the submarines themselves arrived! I had read that the author was not aware of ULTRA and the fact that American Intelligence was listening in on many German communications. However, even he should have started suspecting something besides use of direction finding equipment given how many times he had to write that groups of American ships and airplanes were vectored to specific locations and found two, three, or four submarines there, tethered to each other.

On the positive side, this book does cover the various technical advances that were made by both sides and describes them in terms that any layman can understand with the technical jargon kept to a minimum. And, by adopting a linear timeline approach, it makes sure to cover all theaters of the war (with the exception of the Pacific, of course) and all the way to the end of the war.

The story of the Naval War during World War 2 would not have been complete without this kind of coverage, but this one seems excessively long given that most of the stories told are basically repeats of others in the same book, with only the names of the people and the numbers of boats being different. This is unfortunate, as this series has long been an excellent reference to have on hand. This volume is simply not up to the standard that has been established with the previous volumes.
Varshav
Monumental, engrossing, well written with loving care by Morison and well researched with documented sources. One of a kind, 15 Volumes which must be purchased and read by any W.W. II buff or interested person. (Which might not be that many these days, as some of our youngsters do not even know what D-Day was,on June 6, 1944 in Normandy, France.) The broad scope of the Naval conflict is there, along with interesting details whenever possible. The U.S. Marine Corps is included with all of their guts and glory.
One caveat: There are omissions, e.g. IV CORAL SEA, MIDWAY AND SUBMARINE ACTIONS, re: the Battle of Midway and Commander Joseph J. Rochefort and his team breaking the Japanese naval code before the Battle of Midway (perhaps at the time of writing by Morison there was a security reason).

There is even a little "humor," as such, under incredible trying circumstances. In Volume XI, page 188, Morrison describes a skipper of an American LCI (Landing Craft Infantry) on D-Day, June 6, 1944:
"After landing American troops at Utah on the afternoon of D-Day, he was sent back to the Solent, where he received orders to load British troops at one of the local hards. Having done so he awaited orders, but none came. Observing an LCI convoy making up in the Solent he decided to join it, lest his passengers run out of food while waiting. As he was passing the Isle of Wight a signal station blinked to him, 'Where do you think you are going?' to which the skipper replied, 'I don't know!' After an interval came the the answer, 'Proceed!'" (Amen) We also learn in volume X THE ATLANTIC BATTLE WON, that Hitler used U-Boats in the Atlantic to forecast the weather for what is known as "The Battle of the Bulge." Hitler wanted the foul weather to stop Allied air attacks, which is what happened at the beginning of the battle.

The main titles to the volumes are (all have further sub-titles to each volume):
I THE BATTLE OF THE ATLANTIC;
II OPERATIONS IN NORTH AFRICAN WATERS;
III THE RISING SUN IN THE PACIFIC;
IV CORAL SEA, MIDWAY AND SUBMARINE ACTIONS;
V THE STRUGGLE FOR GUADALCANAL;
VI BREAKING THE BISMARCKS BARRIER;
VII ALEUTIANS, GILBERTS AND MARSHALLS;
VIII NEW GUINEA AND THE MARIANAS;
IX SICILY - SALERNO - ANZIO;
X THE ATLANTIC BATTLE WON;
XI THE INVASION OF FRANCE AND GERMANY;
XII LEYTE;
XIII THE LIBERATION OF THE PHILIPPINES, LUZON, MINDANAO, THE VISAYAS;
XIV VICTORY IN THE PACIFIC;
XV SUPPLEMENT AND GENERAL INDEX (which includes in this volume the illustrations for all book dust covers with explanations- if your copy does not come with the book dust covers.)

With that said, I would have much shorter reference work handy to help steer through these 15 volumes and all the events in them, such as James L. Stokesbury's "A Short History of World War II," which really helps to put events into a succinct perspective (e.g. "The Battle of the Java Sea.")

For general reference: "O2S4 MEC:"
Objective (Simplicity);
Offensive, Sprit of;
Superiority at Point of Contact (Economy of Force);
Surprise (Security);
Security (Surprise);
Simplicity (Objective);
Movement (Mobility);
Economy of Force (Superiority at Point of Contact);
Cooperation (Unity of Command)
History of United States Naval Operations in World War II. Vol. 5: The Struggle for Guadalcanal, August 1942-February 1943 download epub
Humanities
Author: Samuel Eliot Morison
ISBN: 025206996X
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: University of Illinois Press (June 28, 2001)
Pages: 456 pages