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Spirited Away (BFI Film Classics) download epub

by Andrew Osmond


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Andrew Osmond's insightful study describes how Miyazaki directed Spirited Away with a degree of creative control undreamt of in most popular cinema, using the film's delightful, freewheeling visual ideas to explore issues ranging from personal agency and responsibility to what Miyazaki sees.

Andrew Osmond's insightful study describes how Miyazaki directed Spirited Away with a degree of creative control undreamt of in most popular cinema, using the film's delightful, freewheeling visual ideas to explore issues ranging from personal agency and responsibility to what Miyazaki sees as the lamentable state of modern Japan.

Set in modern Japan, the film is a wildly imaginative fantasy, at once personal and universal. It tells the story of a listless little girl, Chihiro, who stumbles into a magical world where gods relax in a palatial bathhouse, where there are giant babies and hard-working soot sprites, and where a train runs across the sea.

Spirited Away (BFI Film Classics). Part of the BFI Film Classics Series).

ANDREW OSMOND is a freelance journalist based in Berkshire, UK. He writes for a range of high-profile film magazines including Sight& Sound, Empire and SFX. show more.

Andrew Osmond's insightful study describes how Miyazaki directed Spirited. He traces connections between Spirited Away and Miyazaki's prior. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Spirited Away by Andrew Osmond (Paperback, 2008). Brand new: lowest price.

Written by anime expert Andrew Osmond – who has previously written a BFI Modern Classic on Spirited Away – Ghost in the Shell concentrates nearly wholly on the 1995 film that is now seen as a highly influential classic, but was largely overlooked when it was originally released. Mamoru Oshii’s (Patlabor: The Movie) cyberpunk sci-fi anime tells the story of Major Kusanagi: a cyborg secret agent on the trail of a mysterious hacker called The Puppet Master, while having an existential crisis in a Blade Runner-esque megatropolis.

Andrew Osmond is a British journalist specializing in film and animation. His first book, BFI Film Classics: Spirited Away, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2008 - "Persuasively and fluidly written" (Time Out London), "the kind of poetic, insightful examination that Spirited Away deserves" (Ain't It Cool News). Osmond has gained high praise for his thoughtful and intellectual take on animation, and is seen as an expert in his field.

Description: Spirited Away, directed by the veteran anime film-maker Hayao Miyazaki, is Japan's most . Andrew Osmond's insightful study describes how Miyazaki directed Spirited Away with a degree of creative control undreamt of in most popular cinema, using the film's delightful, freewheeling visual ideas to explore issues ranging from personal agency and responsibility to what Miyazaki sees as the lamentable state of modern Japan.

Spirited Away, directed by the veteran anime film-maker Hayao Miyazaki, is Japan's most successful film, and one of the top-grossing 'foreign language' films ever released. Set in modern Japan, the film is a wildly imaginative fantasy, at once personal and universal. It tells the story of a listless little girl who stumbles into a magical world where gods relax in a palatial bathhouse, where there are giant babies and hard-working soot sprites, and where a train runs across the sea. Andrew Osmond's insightful study describes how Miyazaki directed Spirited Away with a degree of creative control undreamt of in most popular cinema, using the film's delightful, freewheeling visual ideas to explore issues ranging from personal agency and responsibility to what Miyazaki sees as the lamentable state of modern Japan. Osmond unpacks the film's visual language, which many Western (and some Japanese) audiences find both beautiful and bewildering. He traces connections between Spirited Away and Miyazaki's prior body of work, arguing that Spirited Away uses the cartoon medium to create a compellingly immersive drawn world.

Comments: (4)

Kashicage
The book is essentially in two parts: the first half on production and the second half on the final film. Neither part goes into enough depth to be particularly insightful. Admittedly, I went through the first section quickly since I am more interested in the film itself.

The first half goes over the production, technical aspects, and the people behind the creation of the film. The content is only surface information, written to be easily understood and probably not very useful to anyone deeply interested in production. I think the DVD of Spirited Away has extra features which cover much of the same information. This section also covers some general information on Studio Ghibli which can be found in dozens of other books on Miyazaki or anime. The information on the company is not used to directly offer understanding to Spirited Away, so it feels like it's just taking up space.

Of interest to me in the first section is how Osmond easily dismisses the film as being a disjointed narrative due to creative differences between Miyazaki and one of his staff. This was annoying to me since I got this book because I think the film's narrative is interesting and brings the film together fairly well. And yet Osmond does not further explore these criticisms or offer an alternative view for his argument on the narrative structure. It gives me the impression that Osmond doesn't really understand this film enough to offer a deeper perspective, so he dismisses it instead.

The second half of the book is about the film itself, and was why I purchased the book. The trouble with this section is that it is a chronological summary of the film with lightly dabbled commentary. The commentary is not especially insightful or always present; the film ending, for instance, is summarized without commentary or further exploration.

The overall effect of this is, for instance, that No Face is brought up once for every appearance he makes, but is never really discussed. If Osmond had gathered up all his separate summary/commentary on No Face and put it together in one section, he could have more effectively used that space to explore the creature and what it's doing in the film. Instead, there's no analysis, no useful exploration, and no depth to the content of the book. The same goes for all major themes, motifs, the other characters, and plot elements; Osmond states when they show up, and might make a comment on it, (some of which are even interesting,) but none of it is discussed.

I bought this book thinking that it was meant to offer deeper insight into the film. This book doesn't do that. I'm not sure what this book is intended for, or who is meant to read it. Since I've seen the film, I don't need to be told what happened in the film, so this book isn't for me. If you've seen the film, you don't need this book.

If you're somehow unable to watch Spirited Away and want to experience the film vicariously through a summary, then you might be interested in this. Otherwise, you can probably gain more insight yourself by just watching the film again, or watch the film with the commentary on, or check out the DVD extras.
Gold as Heart
As Miyazaki fans, our family really enjoyed learning the background information for the story and the film.
Kuve
This book is a marvel, especially for the Miyazaki ignorant (who know little of the man outside of his work.) He discusses the man's life, the Japanese mythology and the story that appeals to all cultures.

Not only does the written speak wonderfully of the animation itself, but defends it's story, and places the film in a realm few films touch, one for kids and adults without irony.

Mr. Osmond brings up everything from tracing Miyazaki's Marxist roots to the films he's making now, and even discusses a bit on anime fanboys discussing the animation autuer on internet forums.

Well worth the read and has honestly made me loved the film even more.
catterpillar
The three-star review is more of a reflection on the entire genre of books about films, and not as much about the actual book in question. Although I found that the insightful analysis of the wonderful film "Spirited Away" was generally good, the entire time I was reading it I was thinking "Why not just watch the movie again?"

I don't think an entire book is necessary to analyze a film - perhaps just 5 to 10 pages at the most. The book itself didn't have much artwork, and I thought the film was a little too over-analyzed. For some reason, the author keeps hinting that certain scenes have a sensual element to them, which I didn't see at all. I like reading about movies, but find that a well-reasoned review tends to be enough written about a film. Film is a visual and emotional art form, and does not have to be analyzed too deeply to be enjoyed.
Spirited Away (BFI Film Classics) download epub
Humanities
Author: Andrew Osmond
ISBN: 1844572307
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: British Film Institute (July 15, 2008)
Pages: 128 pages