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Katie's Canon: Womanism and the Soul of the Black Community download epub

by Katie Geneva Cannon


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Katie's Canon is both provocative and enlightening. She excels at unpacking the literary heritage of Zora Neale Hurston and the vitality of the black oral tradition

Katie's Canon is both provocative and enlightening. She excels at unpacking the literary heritage of Zora Neale Hurston and the vitality of the black oral tradition. Her role "is to speak as 'one of the canonical boys' and as the 'noncanonical other' at one and the same time. In this, she most assuredly succeeds.

Her role 'is to speak as "one of t In her book, the explosive voice of Katie Geneva Cannon as womanist and theological liberation ethicist boldly proclaims the vital presence and contributions of African-American women. -The Presbyterian Outlook. Her role 'is to speak as "one of the canonical boys" and as the "non-canonical other" at one and the same time.

Katie Geneva Cannon (1950–2018) was an American Christian theologian and ethicist associated with womanist theology and black theology. She was the first African-American woman ordained in the United Presbyterian Church (USA), which occurred in 1974. Born on January 3, 1950, Cannon spent her childhood in Kannapolis, North Carolina, a racially segregated community where she could not use local facilities such as the YMCA, swimming pool or library.

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In her book, the explosive voice of Katie Geneva Cannon as womanist and theological liberation ethicist boldly proclaims the vital presence and contributions o. .

Includes bibliographical references and index. Foreword, Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot - 1. Surviving the Blight - 2. Slave Ideology and Biblical Interpretation - 3. The Emergence of Black Feminist Consciousness - 4. Moral Wisdom in the Black Women's Literary Tradition - 5. Womanist Perspectival Discourse and Canon Formation - 6. Resources for a Constructive Ethic: The Life and Work of Zora Neale

Katie Cannon in 1989. Katie Geneva Cannon was born on Jan. 3, 1950, in Kannapolis, .

Katie Cannon in 1989. At a young age she saw a disconnect between much of the Christian message and the heavily segregated world in which she lived. John Leyba/The Denver Post, via Getty Images. In her teaching, at various seminaries and divinity schools and in books like Black Womanist Ethics (1988) and Katie’s Canon: Womanism and the Soul of the Black Community (1995), she pushed to broaden the definitions and frames of reference underlying religious and ethical thought.

Katie's Canon: Womanism and the Soul of the Black Community.

Westminster John Knox Press, 1988. Katie's Canon: Womanism and the Soul of the Black Community. Teaching Preaching: Isaac Rufus Clark and Black Sacred Rhetoric. Womanist Theological Ethics: A Reader

Complete Biography of Katie Geneva Cannon affair, height, weight, age, net worth & salary. Westminster John Knox Press, 1988. Katie's Cannon: Womanism as well as the Soul from the Dark Community.

Complete Biography of Katie Geneva Cannon affair, height, weight, age, net worth & salary. Marital status of Katie Geneva Cannon: partner/spouse; wife/husband;. What is Katie Geneva Cannon nationality, education, ethnicity? Biography.

In her book, the explosive voice of Katie Geneva Cannon as womanist and theological liberation ethicist boldly proclaims the vital presence and contributions of African-American women." <br/>--The Presbyterian Outlook <br/><br/>"Cannon moves easily from the passion of folklore and legend to the conceptually rich...language of ethics and womanist theology. Her role 'is to speak as "one of the canonical boys" and as the "non-canonical other" at one and the same time.' In this, she most assuredly succeeds." <br/>--Library Journal <br/><br/>"Every theologian, student, and lay person should have a copy of Katie's Canon to measure the breadth and depth of their theological commitment. I strongly recommend it." <br/>--James H. Cone>

Comments: (2)

Hunaya
Katie Geneva Cannon is a Christian theologian and ethicist who is Professor for Christian Ethics at Union Presbyterian Seminary. She has also written Black Womanist Ethics,Teaching Preaching: Isaac Rufus Clark and Black Sacred Rhetoric, etc.

She wrote in the Preface to this 1995 book, “[This book] is a selection from essays I wrote for diverse occasions over a period of ten years. Some of this writing took place at Harvard Divinity School in 1983 when I was a Women’s research Associate in Christian Social Ethics… I was able to rethink some of the pedagogical concerns and so to broaden the context of my ideas. In bringing this work together in one volume, I lay bare womanist norms for emancipatory praxis. In each essay I am conducting a three-pronged systemic analysis of race, sex, and class from the perspective of African American women in the academy of religion.”

In her essay, ‘Moral Wisdom in the Black Women’s Literary Tradition,’ she states, “It is my thesis that the Black women’s literary tradition is the best available literary repository for understanding the ethical values Black women have created and cultivated in their participation in this society. To prevail against the odds with integrity, Black women must assess their moral agency within the social conditions of the community. Locked out of the real dynamics or human freedom in America, they implicitly pass on moral formulas for survival that allow them to stand over against the perversions of ethics and morality imposed on them by Whites and males who support racial imperialism in a patriarchal social order.” (Pg. 61)

In her essay ‘’Womanist Perspectival Discourse and Canon Formation’ she provides some insight into the essay’s (as well as this collection’s!) title: “My personal title for this essay is ‘Katie’s Canon,’ wherein I identify the critical contestable issues at the center of Black life---issues inscribed on the bodies of Black people. As a womanist liberation ethicist I have a solemn responsibility to investigate the African American women’s literary tradition by asking hard questions and pressing insistently about the responsibility of this canon of books to the truthful, consistent, and coherent representation of Black existence in contemporary society. I am arguing that there is a certain distinguishable body of writings by African American women characterized by fidelity in communicating the baffling complexities and the irreducible contradictions of the Black experience in America. When seen through critical, theo-ethical lenses, Black women writers skillfully and successfully supply the patterns of conduct, feeling and contestable issues that exist in the real-lived context that lies behind this literature.” (Pg. 70)

In the essay ‘The Womanist Dilemma in the Development of a Black Liberation Ethic,’ she suggests, “A womanist liberation ethic requires us to gather information and to assess accurately the factual evidence regarding Black women’s contribution to the Black church community. Black women organized voluntary missionary societies, superintended church schools, led prayer meetings, took an active part in visiting and ministering to the sick and needy, and raised large amounts of money to defray the expenses of the Black church. Black women are conscious actors who have altered the theological picture in significant ways. Furthermore, this second area of research does more than increase our understanding of Black women in the church community; it also elicits reinterpretation of old conclusions about the church universal.” (Pg. 127-128)

In the essay ‘Appropriation and Reciprocity in the Doing of Womanist Ethics,’ she states, “In my experience as a Black woman in a racist and misogynist society, tremendous pressure is continually exerted on me to choose between my racial identity and my womanhood. Black women are repeatedly asked to cast our lot identifying loyalties in one or the other competing camp. Either we are Blacks or we are women. Despite womanist scholars’ best efforts in arguing that this is a conceptual impossibility because we embody both realities as Black women, the full force of the punitive and damaging effects of binary categories remains intact. When African American women defy the traditionally accepted race and gender niches of where others think we and our work belong, our essential worth and competence comes into question.” (Pg. 131)

These essays are a valuable addition to Cannon’s other work, and to womanist theology and philosophy in general; they will be of great value to anyone studying these areas.
Rrd
If you are interested in the perspective of Black Womanist Ethics, or black theological perspectives on injustice in general, I highly recommend that you go elsewhere. There are a few redeeming aspects to this work - the few chapters written on slavery are crisp, captivating, even shocking - and certainly worth the read. The end material (reviewing the theory of Oliver Cox) that criticizes capitalism as also supportive of racism is interesting - very wrong - but interesting. Cannon needs to update her perspective to include the very real economic powerhouses in Japan, Korea and China. She speaks as if none of these countries existed, since they get no mention. Aside from these chapters, Cannon's writing style deteriorates into "academese" - or empty, intellectual-sounding rhetoric that make the pretense to being profound, but really has a really simple, if not often wrong thesis. The perspective of black women, especially in religion and ethics is welcome, but this theory is simply terribly written, in typically arcane academic style, and often empty or just wrong. The book itself is also more of a "non-book", being a collection of essays on a loosely written theme, but with no prevailing thesis or guiding logic throughout.
Katie's Canon: Womanism and the Soul of the Black Community download epub
Humanities
Author: Katie Geneva Cannon
ISBN: 0826410340
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic (April 3, 1998)
Pages: 192 pages