» » The Unitarians and Universalists: (Denominations in America)

The Unitarians and Universalists: (Denominations in America) download epub

by David Robinson


Epub Book: 1553 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1641 kb.

Published by Praeger The Unitarians and the Universalists, The Baptists, The Quakers, The Congregationalists, The Presbyterians, The Roman . Denominations in America Series. 11 primary works, 11 total works. Published by Praeger.

Published by Praeger The Unitarians and the Universalists, The Baptists, The Quakers, The Congregationalists, The Presbyterians, The Roman Catholics In . . The Unitarians and the Universalists. Shelve The Unitarians and the Universalists.

The Unitarians and Universalists: (Denominations in America). This book presents a very useful history of Unitarianism and Universalism, and is a must-read if you're interested in those traditions. 0313209464 (ISBN13: 9780313209468). Aug 10, 2014 Steve Wiggins rated it really liked it. A very thorough introduction to Unitarianism and Universalism. Following the series template, the biographical section is a bit atomistic, but the information is very good. However, it is really boring and dry; it took me months to get through because it put me to sleep.

The Unitarians and the Universalists. Part of the Denominations in America Series).

A number of notable people have considered themselves Unitarians, Universalists, and following the merger of these denominations in the United States and Canada in 1961, Unitarian Universalists

A number of notable people have considered themselves Unitarians, Universalists, and following the merger of these denominations in the United States and Canada in 1961, Unitarian Universalists. Additionally, there are persons who, because of their writings or reputation, are considered to have held Unitarian or Universalist beliefs. Individuals who held unitarian (nontrinitarian) beliefs but were not affiliated with Unitarian organizations are often referred to as "small 'u'" unitarians.

The Unitarians and Universalists. Denominations in America (Hardcover). Denominations in America 1. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1985. Daniel Walker Howe (a1).

Unitarianism, in general, the form of Christianity that denies the doctrine of the Trinity, believing that God exists only in one person. While there were previous antitrinitarian movements in the early Christian Church, like Arianism and Monarchianism, modern Unitarianism originated in the period of the Protestant Reformation. In Geneva, Michael Servetus was burned at the stake (1553) for his antitrinitarian views. Under Faustus Socinus a strong center of Unitarian belief developed in Poland. In Transylvania, Francis Dávid laid the foundation (. 560) for the Unitarian Church there

The Unitarians and Universalists: (Denominations in America). Unitarian Universalists today can benefit from greater awareness of the depth and resources of their own faith tradition. Overall, an excellent and much-needed resource. -Paul Rasor, author, Faith Without Certainty and Reclaiming Prophetic Witness.

Unitarian Universalism was formed from the consolidation in 1961 of two historically Christian denominations, the Universalist Church of America and the American Unitarian Association, both based in the United States; th.

Unitarian Universalism was formed from the consolidation in 1961 of two historically Christian denominations, the Universalist Church of America and the American Unitarian Association, both based in the United States; the new organization formed in this merger was the Unitarian Universalist Association. At the time of the North American consolidation, Unitarians and Universalists had expanded beyond their roots in liberal Christian. We, the member congregations of the Unitarian Universalist Association, covenant to affirm and promote.

Product information not available.


Comments: (5)

CrazyDemon
David Robinson (b. 1947) has also written Natural Life: Thoreau's Worldly Transcendentalism,Apostle of Culture: Emerson As Preacher and Lecturer ,Emerson and the Conduct of Life: Pragmatism and Ethical Purpose in the Later Work (Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture), and World of Relations: The Achievement of Peter Taylor.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1985 book, “Unitarianism and Universalism [are] the most freely unorthodox of the American religious movements. Each one has deep roots in American history, with Unitarianism evolving from the original New England Puritan churches and Universalism evolving in challenge to those churches. Each movement has also had a profound impact on American culture… the merger of the two denominations in 1961 deepened those complexities by emphasizing a continuity of thought that, however real, does not explain the very different origins of the movements… one must resist the temptation to think of a common movement of religious liberalism in America. I have thus traced in the first part of this book the early currents of two separate streams of liberal thinking, which merged only gradually.”

He notes, “Hosea Ballou held the intellectual and personal leadership of Universalism in the early nineteenth century, and he pushed the concept of Universalism a step beyond [John] Murray. For Murray, salvation was eventually assured, although suffering for many after death, for a limited time, was probable. As Ballou gradually began to see it, all punishment for sin was in the consequences of sin in this life. After death, all were saved with no period of suffering. Ballou’s version of Universalism sparked a heated and at points divisive debate among Universalists in the nineteenth century. The ‘ultra-Universalists’ followed Ballou in rejecting all future punishment, and the ‘Restorationists’ held that limited punishment was part of the Divine plan.” (Pg. 5)

He suggests. “The name ‘Unitarian’ has long suggested that the dominant idea among the liberal Congregationalists was a rejection of Trinitarian doctrine, when in fact the stress on moral culture and the corresponding rejection of innate depravity were the defining impulses of that tradition. But although there is no inevitable connection between Unitarian views of Christ and theories of moral culture, there seems to have been a ‘temperamental’ and ‘historical’ connection between them as they developed in New England.” (Pg. 29)

He observes, “Murray, and most of the early Universalists, found themselves allied with the Baptists, Quakers, independent revivalists, and other dissenting sects, who were leading the fight for an absolute separation of church and state… The marked diversity of origins of the Universalist denomination makes it difficult to pinpoint a starting point for the movement. Murray has been accorded the distinction of ‘founder’ of American Universalism, as his career as a preacher of Rellyan [James Relly] doctrine is the clearest link between English Universalist thinking and the American Universalist movement. The Universalist views of many of the German pietists who migrated to the colonies in the middle eighteenth century are another important strand in these origins, but there were also important indigenous root of the movement, arising as one result of eighteenth-century evangelicalism and the general revolt against Calvinism. The Baptist movement in particular was a seedbed for early Universalism, and a good many Universalist leaders and followers… arrived at their views by way of Baptist evangelicalism.” (Pg. 47-48)

He recounts, “While still wrestling with the issue of Universalism, [Elhanan] Winchester moved to Philadelphia in 1780 as pastor of the First Baptist Church. As his belief in the universal restoration grew, and word of it spread among the congregation, he found himself in the center of a controversy. He was eventually pushed out of that church but took with him a part of the congregation, which formed a new church. In 1781 Winchester publicly asserted his Universalist views, and while continuing to preach in Philadelphia (1781-87) he assumed a role of leadership as a Universalist spokesman and controversialist. Because of his status as a Baptist evangelical preacher of great power (from all accounts he was a spellbinder from the pulpit), his outspoken espousal of Universalism was an embarrassment, and a cause for some concern, among the Baptists.” (Pg. 51)

He explains, “in essence Ballou’s Treatise on Atonement is a wholesale attack on Calvinism. Even though attacking Calvinism was not Ballou’s exclusive object, nor was it even his named opponent, his fundamental purpose was to undermine what he believed was the basis of the entire Calvinist system, the notion of the vicarious atonement of Christ for the sins of humankind.” (Pg. 61)

He points out, “The feminist roots of American Universalism can be traced to a prominent source---Judith Sargent Murray, the wife of the denominations founder John Murray. An author and early advocate of sexual equality… Murray’s strong defense of woman’s nature also shows a close and natural recurrence to theology to support the arguments for their equality. Women were eager to meet the religious sanctions of their oppression with a religious justification for their liberation… Olympia Brown … was admitted to the Universalist school at St. Lawrence University, but even there her pursuit of training was by no means easy. By 1870, one hundred years after the sect was founded, only fifteen women had been Universalist preachers in America, and that record was, by the standards of the day, a good one… both Unitarianism and Universalism do leave us with some impressive women’s stories…” (Pg. 127)

He states, “Although much of our attention has been focused on the Unitarian approach to merger, many of the same trends toward universalizing liberal religion were also at work among the Universalists. Even at the Universalist Centennial celebration of 1870 there was a disposition to seize upon the sense of ‘Universalism’ as the universal world religion. Foreign missionary efforts began soon thereafter, and the Universalists were further moved toward an interdenominational position…” (Pg. 171)

He states, “As the two denominations moved toward merger the debate about its advisability intensified. Although it seemed from one point of view a wise combination of resources that would expand the capacities of both groups, others saw the move toward merger as a dissipation of energies that would be better spent on local problems or within existing denominational channels…. there were still deeply felt differences about the religious orientation of the two denominations, differences both within and between the denominations… Perhaps more importantly, however, the eventual merger plan was overwhelmingly ratified by the individual churches and then by the American Unitarian Association annual meeting and the Universalist General Assembly. All issues had not been resolved in every mind, but an undeniable consensus had been achieved on the merger of the denominations.” (Pg. 173-174)

The second half of the book is a “Biographical Dictionary of Unitarian and Universalist Leaders,” which is an admirably detailed and very valuable reference source.

For anyone interested in the history of the Unitarian and Universalist denominations, this will be “must reading.”
Darkraven
Item as described; very pleased with my purchase!!
Abywis
David Robinson (b. 1947) has also written Natural Life: Thoreau's Worldly Transcendentalism,Apostle of Culture: Emerson As Preacher and Lecturer ,Emerson and the Conduct of Life: Pragmatism and Ethical Purpose in the Later Work (Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture), and World of Relations: The Achievement of Peter Taylor.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1985 book, “Unitarianism and Universalism [are] the most freely unorthodox of the American religious movements. Each one has deep roots in American history, with Unitarianism evolving from the original New England Puritan churches and Universalism evolving in challenge to those churches. Each movement has also had a profound impact on American culture… the merger of the two denominations in 1961 deepened those complexities by emphasizing a continuity of thought that, however real, does not explain the very different origins of the movements… one must resist the temptation to think of a common movement of religious liberalism in America. I have thus traced in the first part of this book the early currents of two separate streams of liberal thinking, which merged only gradually.”

He notes, “Hosea Ballou held the intellectual and personal leadership of Universalism in the early nineteenth century, and he pushed the concept of Universalism a step beyond [John] Murray. For Murray, salvation was eventually assured, although suffering for many after death, for a limited time, was probable. As Ballou gradually began to see it, all punishment for sin was in the consequences of sin in this life. After death, all were saved with no period of suffering. Ballou’s version of Universalism sparked a heated and at points divisive debate among Universalists in the nineteenth century. The ‘ultra-Universalists’ followed Ballou in rejecting all future punishment, and the ‘Restorationists’ held that limited punishment was part of the Divine plan.” (Pg. 5)

He suggests. “The name ‘Unitarian’ has long suggested that the dominant idea among the liberal Congregationalists was a rejection of Trinitarian doctrine, when in fact the stress on moral culture and the corresponding rejection of innate depravity were the defining impulses of that tradition. But although there is no inevitable connection between Unitarian views of Christ and theories of moral culture, there seems to have been a ‘temperamental’ and ‘historical’ connection between them as they developed in New England.” (Pg. 29)

He observes, “Murray, and most of the early Universalists, found themselves allied with the Baptists, Quakers, independent revivalists, and other dissenting sects, who were leading the fight for an absolute separation of church and state… The marked diversity of origins of the Universalist denomination makes it difficult to pinpoint a starting point for the movement. Murray has been accorded the distinction of ‘founder’ of American Universalism, as his career as a preacher of Rellyan [James Relly] doctrine is the clearest link between English Universalist thinking and the American Universalist movement. The Universalist views of many of the German pietists who migrated to the colonies in the middle eighteenth century are another important strand in these origins, but there were also important indigenous root of the movement, arising as one result of eighteenth-century evangelicalism and the general revolt against Calvinism. The Baptist movement in particular was a seedbed for early Universalism, and a good many Universalist leaders and followers… arrived at their views by way of Baptist evangelicalism.” (Pg. 47-48)

He recounts, “While still wrestling with the issue of Universalism, [Elhanan] Winchester moved to Philadelphia in 1780 as pastor of the First Baptist Church. As his belief in the universal restoration grew, and word of it spread among the congregation, he found himself in the center of a controversy. He was eventually pushed out of that church but took with him a part of the congregation, which formed a new church. In 1781 Winchester publicly asserted his Universalist views, and while continuing to preach in Philadelphia (1781-87) he assumed a role of leadership as a Universalist spokesman and controversialist. Because of his status as a Baptist evangelical preacher of great power (from all accounts he was a spellbinder from the pulpit), his outspoken espousal of Universalism was an embarrassment, and a cause for some concern, among the Baptists.” (Pg. 51)

He explains, “in essence Ballou’s Treatise on Atonement is a wholesale attack on Calvinism. Even though attacking Calvinism was not Ballou’s exclusive object, nor was it even his named opponent, his fundamental purpose was to undermine what he believed was the basis of the entire Calvinist system, the notion of the vicarious atonement of Christ for the sins of humankind.” (Pg. 61)

He points out, “The feminist roots of American Universalism can be traced to a prominent source---Judith Sargent Murray, the wife of the denominations founder John Murray. An author and early advocate of sexual equality… Murray’s strong defense of woman’s nature also shows a close and natural recurrence to theology to support the arguments for their equality. Women were eager to meet the religious sanctions of their oppression with a religious justification for their liberation… Olympia Brown … was admitted to the Universalist school at St. Lawrence University, but even there her pursuit of training was by no means easy. By 1870, one hundred years after the sect was founded, only fifteen women had been Universalist preachers in America, and that record was, by the standards of the day, a good one… both Unitarianism and Universalism do leave us with some impressive women’s stories…” (Pg. 127)

He states, “Although much of our attention has been focused on the Unitarian approach to merger, many of the same trends toward universalizing liberal religion were also at work among the Universalists. Even at the Universalist Centennial celebration of 1870 there was a disposition to seize upon the sense of ‘Universalism’ as the universal world religion. Foreign missionary efforts began soon thereafter, and the Universalists were further moved toward an interdenominational position…” (Pg. 171)

He states, “As the two denominations moved toward merger the debate about its advisability intensified. Although it seemed from one point of view a wise combination of resources that would expand the capacities of both groups, others saw the move toward merger as a dissipation of energies that would be better spent on local problems or within existing denominational channels…. there were still deeply felt differences about the religious orientation of the two denominations, differences both within and between the denominations… Perhaps more importantly, however, the eventual merger plan was overwhelmingly ratified by the individual churches and then by the American Unitarian Association annual meeting and the Universalist General Assembly. All issues had not been resolved in every mind, but an undeniable consensus had been achieved on the merger of the denominations.” (Pg. 173-174)

The second half of the book is a “Biographical Dictionary of Unitarian and Universalist Leaders,” which is an admirably detailed and very valuable reference source.

For anyone interested in the history of the Unitarian and Universalist denominations, this will be “must reading.”
Kanek
I recently gave this book a second try and am very glad I did. This book is an indispensable reference to the many struggles in a religious tradition that is largely trying to move away from previous religious traditions. I’m finding it very helpful in addressing my own very large questions about Unitarian Universalism and its future prospects and relevance. It sheds much light into the struggles inherent in such an institutional framework and provides a survey of those very thoughtful Unitarian and Universalist thinkers who fought and supported this denomination.
Pemand
I'll keep this review short and sweet, because there's not much to say, really. /The Unitarians and Universalists/ offers a comprehensive look at the history of Unitarianism and Universalism, and their mixing in recent times. However, the book is rather dry and offers very little "food for thought." It's mostly names, dates, and movements. The writing is uninspired and not very compelling.

As a guide to the history of UU, this book is acceptable. I've encountered far more interesting books and essays on the subject, however. The level of detail is high, but you will definitely not find yourself reading this book for anything beyond obscure details of the past.
The Unitarians and Universalists: (Denominations in America) download epub
Humanities
Author: David Robinson
ISBN: 0313209464
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Greenwood (March 22, 1985)
Pages: 368 pages