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American Soldiers: Ground Combat in the World Wars, Korea, and Vietnam (Modern War Studies) download epub

by Peter S. Kindsvatter


Epub Book: 1124 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1486 kb.

He is a sensitive, skillful mediator between those writers and u. -Russell F. Weigley, author of The American Way of War. "A vivid portrayal of the savagery of war and its human dimensions. -Michael D. Doubler, author of Closing with the Enemy: How GIs Fought the War in Europe, 1944–1945. Winner of the Richard W. Leopold Prize, given by the Organization of American Historians.

American Soldiers book. Peter S. Kindsvatter has written an excellent history of American combat soldiers between the First World War and the Vietnam War. His study is pregnant with insights about both the particular experience of soldiers in each war and the universal psychological and physiological factors that affect combatants.

Kindsvatter's American Soldiers is a masterful work of historical synthesis .

Kindsvatter's American Soldiers is a masterful work of historical synthesis that marshals an astonishing array of sources-from soldiers' memoirs to historical fiction-to paint a compelling portrait of soldier behavior in the two world wars, Korea and Vietnam. Kindsvatter has written a book that is both compelling and informative, not to mention well-illustrated, which should be mandatory reading for anyone even remotely interested in military affairs.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 405-420) and index. A sobering chronicle of war as well as a tribute to soldiers' perseverance in the face of its horrors that draws upon soldiers' memoirs, psychological studies, and oral histories to show that - regardless of the enemy, terrain, training, or weaponry - combat soldiers' wartime experiences remain fundamentally the same. Publisher Fact Sheet.

by Peter S. Kindsvatter.

book by Peter S. Some warriors are drawn to the thrill of combat and find it the defining moment of their lives. by Peter S.

Kindsvatter gets inside the minds of American soldiers to reveal what motivated them to serve and how they were turned into soldiers

Kindsvatter gets inside the minds of American soldiers to reveal what motivated them to serve and how they were turned into soldiers. He re-creates the physical and emotional aspects of war to tell how fighting men dealt with danger and hardship, and he explores the roles of comradeship, leadership, and the sustaining beliefs in cause and country. He also illuminates soldiers' attitudes toward the enemy, toward the rear echelon, and toward the home front. And he tells why some broke down under fire while others excelled.

Lawrence: University Press of Kansas. This article examines the way in which Jewish soldiers are portrayed in American war fiction, on the basis of four texts by authors William Wharton, Winston Groom, Philip Roth and Norman Mailer

Lawrence: University Press of Kansas. This article examines the way in which Jewish soldiers are portrayed in American war fiction, on the basis of four texts by authors William Wharton, Winston Groom, Philip Roth and Norman Mailer. It depicts the situation in which Jewish soldiers find themselves, their fears, convictions and objections, and the prejudice they face presented, depending on the work and author.

American Soldiers: Ground Combat in the World Wars, Korea, and Vietnam

American Soldiers: Ground Combat in the World Wars, Korea, and Vietnam. Written by Peter S. Narrated by Joshua Swanson. By capturing the core "band of brothers" experience across several generations of warfare, Kindsvatter celebrates the American soldier while helping us to better understand war's lethal reality-and why soldiers persevere in the face of its horrors. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Peter S. Foreword by Russell F. Weigley. What, indeed, motivated novelist James Jones and his fellow GIs in World War II, or American soldiers in World War I or the Korean and Vietnam Wars, to go out into dangerous places? And once there-in the combat zone-what enabled them to persevere until all too often they did die, or were wounded or emotionally broken? These questions generate more than just interesting speculation. The answers are critically important.

of American combat soldiers, from the doughboys of World War I to the grunts of Vietnam. Modern War Studies (Paperback).

The book draws on histories and memoirs to show that their experiences remain the same regardless of the enemy, terrain, training, or weaponry. University Press of Kansas.

Some warriors are drawn to the thrill of combat and find it the defining moment of their lives. Others fall victim to fear, exhaustion, impaired reasoning, and despair. This was certainly true for twentieth-century American ground troops. Whether embracing or being demoralized by war, these men risked their lives for causes larger than themselves with no promise of safe return.This book is the first to synthesize the wartime experiences of American combat soldiers, from the doughboys of World War I to the grunts of Vietnam. Focusing on both soldiers and marines, it draws on histories and memoirs, oral histories, psychological and sociological studies, and even fiction to show that their experiences remain fundamentally the same regardless of the enemy, terrain, training, or weaponry.Peter Kindsvatter gets inside the minds of American soldiers to reveal what motivated them to serve and how they were turned into soldiers. He recreates the physical and emotional aspects of war to tell how fighting men dealt with danger and hardship, and he explores the roles of comradeship, leadership, and the sustaining beliefs in cause and country. He also illuminates soldiers' attitudes toward the enemy, toward the rear echelon, and toward the home front. And he tells why some broke down under fire while others excelled.Here are the first tastes of battle, as when a green recruit reported that "for the first time I realized that the people over the ridge wanted to kill me," while another was befuddled by the unfamiliar sound of bullets whizzing overhead. Here are soldiers struggling to cope with war's stress by seeking solace from local women or simply smoking cigarettes. And here are tales of combat avoidance and fraggings not unique to Vietnam, of soldiers in Korea disgruntled over home-front indifference, and of the unique experiences of African American soldiers in the Jim Crow army.By capturing the core "band of brothers" experience across several generations of warfare, Kindsvatter celebrates the American soldier while helping us to better understand war's lethal reality—and why soldiers persevere in the face of its horrors.

Comments: (3)

Hra
Wow! It isn't often that I actually feel a little shaken by virtue of what I have read, but if anything can conjure up for one an unforgettable yet eminently non-fictional picture of the modern battlefield in the post-WWII era, then this book by retired U. S. Army historian Peter Kindsvatter does so. What the author offer is literally a phenomenological exploration into the heart of darkness of modern combat, one into which young soldiers have been sucked into the vortex of the experience with wildly inaccurate and romanticized notions regarding their own fallacious expectations of the experience. As the dust jacket appropriately remarks, this is a journey into the hearts and minds of the average soldier, in Korea, Vietnam and since, and shows how popular "John Wayne" colorized fictions set our kids up for a fateful slam into the brick wall of a much more horrible reality. Thus, beginning with such unrealistic ideas of what to expect, Kindsvatter argues quite forcefully that such inaccurate conceptualizations aided the solders in creating what he refers to as a "fictionalized" set of images of war.
Therefore, despite the relatively intensive military training the young recruits received, the author contends nothing could succeed in disabusing them of these fallacious notions or completely prepare them for the horror of actual combat. The nature of that combat, with its extreme emotional stress, physical hardships, and bloodthirsty graphics, spawned a kind of emotional syndrome that the author argues progresses fairly predictably from initial shock and disbelief through a period of confusion toward a perpetual state of much more hyperawareness, a state in which their immediate performance becomes maximal while the effects on their long-term mental health becomes progressively more dangerous. Critical to the success of this progression of this 'pilgrim's progress' from disbelief through confusion and into a battle-weary hyper-vigilance was the camaraderie of their fellow soldiers, their belief systems, and each soldier's individual will to survive. Obviously, Kindsvatter observes, in situations such as Vietnam, where the belief systems came into serious question both within the ranks and in the culture back home, successful maintenance of this state of combat readiness was more and more imperiled.
What the author contends is that once such belief systems are destroyed, few things can repair or sustain them. For some, the excitement of battle turns them into "combat junkies", and it is these guys who may succeed in surviving only to find readjustment to civil society later is extremely hazardous. For the majority, it was integration into the unit and the friendships within it that sustained them, and allowed them to continue under some of the most extreme continuing conditions modern humans can experience. Yet eventually, for most soldiers the ability to function slowly eroded, to the point that many casualties occurred for "burned out" grunts who had more than enough savvy to protect themselves, but who has lost the kind of emotional edge they needed to continue. In these cases, many of them suffered emotional breakdowns and/or total physical exhaustion. This is an important book, and one that anyone with either a friend or relative in the military would do well to read. I hope it gains wider readership, as it is a serious, enlightened, and worthwhile entry into the field of military history. Enjoy!
JoJolar
As a member of the military I feel this book is a very good explanation of what it is like to be a soldier. It covers many things as to how it feels to be there and that makes it different then every other book out there. My only complaint is that it uses a few fiction books as "sources." Now these fiction books are supposed to be real life stories told in the fiction venue but still, not credible sources. But beyond that I feel the book is a great read for anyone interested in what is is like to be a soldier.
Thordigda
Awful. Dry, totally academic treatment. Maybe for a academic course on sociology, but not history. Even worse is the audiobook, narrated terribly.
American Soldiers: Ground Combat in the World Wars, Korea, and Vietnam (Modern War Studies) download epub
Humanities
Author: Peter S. Kindsvatter
ISBN: 0700614168
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas (April 3, 2003)
Pages: 456 pages