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The Indian Wants the Bronx. (Acting Edition for Theater Productions) download epub

by Israel Horovitz


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The Indian Wants the Bronx is a one-act play by Israel Horovitz. Gupta, the Indian of the title, has just arrived in New York City from his native country to visit his son and speaks only a few words of English.

The Indian Wants the Bronx is a one-act play by Israel Horovitz. While waiting for a bus to The Bronx, he is approached by two young punks, Joey and Murph, who begin teasing him. Name-calling taunts eventually result in acts of rage and violence.

The Indian Wants the Bronx – by Israel Horovitz. The Great Work – book by Grant Sorenson, music and lyrics by David Darrow (a 7th House Theater production presented by the Guthrie Theater). The Man with the Flower in his Mouth – by Luigi Pirandello. Quirk – by Omar Shapli. The Amish Project – by Jessica Dickey (Singular Voices/Plural Perspectives series). You for Me for You – by Mia Chung (a Mu Performing Arts production presented by the Guthrie Theater). A Actor Training Program Class of 2016: Earthquakes in London – by Mike Bartlett.

Recommended to anyone who has seen the play and wants to compare it to the original, written screenplay for consistency. One person found this helpful.

Gupta, the Indian of the title, has just arrived in New York City from his native country to visit his .

Gupta, the Indian of the title, has just arrived in New York City from his native country to visit his son and speaks only a few words of English The play was staged in conjunction with the playwright's It's Called the Sugar Plum by James Hammerstein as the opening production of the new off-Broadway Astor Place Theatre, where it opened on January 17, 1968 and ran for 177 performances. The cast included Al Pacino and John Cazale.

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Theatre Company based in New York. ONE19 Productions presents A Night Of Horovitz; The Indian Wants The Bronx, Beirut Rocks through October 22nd.

is a one act play by Israel Horovitz. The Indian of the title is Gupta, who has just arrived in New York City from his native country to visit his son and speaks only a few words of English

is a one act play by Israel Horovitz. The Indian of the title is Gupta, who has just arrived in New York City from his native country to visit his son and speaks only a few words of English.

THE STORY: An East Indian gets lost on his first day in New York as two teenage punks find him waiting at a lonely bus stop

THE STORY: An East Indian gets lost on his first day in New York as two teenage punks find him waiting at a lonely bus stop. He cannot understand English, and the boys have some fun with him-at least it starts out as fun. But little by little, as the minutes go by and the bus doesn't come, they get bored; then annoyed; then vicious.

Israel Horovitz (for his play "The Indian Wants the Bronx"). All Shows People Organizations Theatres Seasons.

January 26, 1970) His play, "Indian Wants the Bronx," was performed at the Actors Theatre of Louisville (Adventure .

January 26, 1970) His play, "Indian Wants the Bronx," was performed at the Actors Theatre of Louisville (Adventure Theatre) in Louisville, Kentucky. 1968 season) Sam Shepard's play, "Red Cross," and his play, "The Indian Wants the Bronx," were performed in a Tyrone Guthrie production At The Other Place Theater, Harmon Place, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Michael Pierce was director.

Book by HOROVITZ, Israel

Comments: (2)

Anyshoun
This plaintive phone message from a Indian father to his son in another part of New York reflects the problems of communication illustrated in this 1968 play. The Indian is stuck at a New York bus stop at night, trying to reach his son's house in the Bronx, which is on a different line. He does not know where he is and has no idea how to get where he wants to go. The Indian doesn't speak English (though his lines are in English in the playbook so that actors can respond to them appropriately). Two toughs (one played in the original production by Al Pacino, who won an Obie for his role) saunter up to him and hassle him, mocking his inability to speak English, his turban, his constant politeness no matter how rude they are, and his predicament of being lost in "their" territory.

In the course of the play, Murph and Joey reveal all their ignorance and prejudices, their hostility, and their feelings of being left out of the mainstream, for which they want to take action. They are mean and aware that in the situation at the bus stop they have all the power. When the hassling becomes more serious, Joey earns his neighborhood stripes, attacking the Indian, who simply wants to get home to his son.

Presented with little scenery, except for a bus stop sign, a telephone booth, and some trash cans, this is a bare-bones play for three characters, depending largely on the actors to convey a sense of menace, rather than on the dialogue. Capturing the political and social unrest in the cities in the 1960s, it simply portrays issues, rather than investigating them or offering any commentary on them, and much of the dialogue and the attitudes are now dated. The Indian is a character for whom the reader/viewer evolves sympathy, but since he speaks no English during the play, the audience must understand him through his body language and sense of ingenuousness. A play which reflects the period in which it was written, it offers less of enduring value for the present day. Mary Whipple
Irostamore
This plaintive phone message from a Indian father to his son in another part of New York reflects the problems of communication illustrated in this 1968 play. The Indian is stuck at a New York bus stop at night, trying to reach his son's house in the Bronx, which is on a different line. He does not know where he is and has no idea how to get where he wants to go. The Indian doesn't speak English (though his lines are in English in the playbook so that actors can respond to them appropriately). Two toughs (one played in the original production by Al Pacino, who won an Obie for his role) saunter up to him and hassle him, mocking his inability to speak English, his turban, his constant politeness no matter how rude they are, and his predicament of being lost in "their" territory.

In the course of the play, Murph and Joey reveal all their ignorance and prejudices, their hostility, and their feelings of being left out of the mainstream, for which they want to take action. They are mean and aware that in the situation at the bus stop they have all the power. When the hassling becomes more serious, Joey earns his neighborhood stripes, attacking the Indian, who simply wants to get home to his son.

Presented with little scenery, except for a bus stop sign, a telephone booth, and some trash cans, this is a bare-bones play for three characters, depending largely on the actors to convey a sense of menace, rather than on the dialogue. Capturing the political and social unrest in the cities in the 1960s, it simply portrays issues, rather than investigating them or offering any commentary on them, and much of the dialogue and the attitudes are now dated. The Indian is a character for whom the reader/viewer evolves sympathy, but since he speaks no English during the play, the audience must understand him through his body language and sense of ingenuousness. A play which reflects the period in which it was written, it offers less of enduring value for the present day. Mary Whipple
The Indian Wants the Bronx. (Acting Edition for Theater Productions) download epub
Humanities
Author: Israel Horovitz
ISBN: 0822205688
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Dramatists Play Service, Inc. (January 1968)
Pages: 46 pages