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Peoples of the Earth: Ethnonationalism, Democracy, and the Indigenous Challenge in "Latin'' America download epub

by Martin Edwin Andersen


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Often treated as outside of the sociopolitical realm, this population's political mobilization in recent decades has forced governments and intellectuals alike to acknowledge its consequential force as a political power. Johns Hopkins University Sais Alumni News No. 50). Martin Edwin Andersen presents a fascinating and comprehensive perspective on Latin American history focusing on the lesser told but nonetheless important.

Bursting with geopolitical insights, "Peoples of the Earth" provides a much needed analysis of issues and trends relating to indigenous rights in Latin America. Whereas the right often portrays indigenes as "hopelessly ignorant, shiftless and lazy" and a block to economic progress (pp14 At Home On Native Lands.

Peoples of the Earth employs a comparative history of ethno-nationalism to examine Indian activism and its challenges to the political, social and economic status quo in the countries of Central and South America. It explores the intersect between problems of democratic empowerment and security-including the appearance of radical Islam among Indians in two important countries-arising from the re-emergence of dormant forms of ethnic militancy and unprecedented internal challenges to nation-states.

Chapter Eleven of "Peoples of the Earth; Ethnonationalism, Democracy and the Indigenous Challenge in 'Latin' America" (Lexington Books, 2010) How is it possible to have 37 episodes (of violence) to then continue sending in the Carabineros (militarized police), thinking that th. .

Chapter Eleven of "Peoples of the Earth; Ethnonationalism, Democracy and the Indigenous Challenge in 'Latin' America" (Lexington Books, 2010) How is it possible to have 37 episodes (of violence) to then continue sending in the Carabineros (militarized police), thinking that the Carabineros will solve the problem? -Francisco Huenchumilla, a Mapuche leader and former secretary-general of the presidency A majority of the native peoples of Chile are Mapuche and number between six hundred thousand and one million people, 4 to 7 percent of the country’s population.

De La Démocratie en Amérique (French pronunciation: ; published in two volumes, the first in 1835 and the second in 1840) is a classic French text by Alexis de Tocqueville. Its title translates as On Democracy in America,. Its title translates as On Democracy in America, but English translations are usually simply entitled Democracy in America. In the book, Tocqueville examines the democratic revolution that he believed had been occurring over the previous several hundred years.

Rubrics: Indigenous peoples Latin America Ethnic identity Politics and government History. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. ISBN: 3631495269 Author: Bernhard, Armin. Download book Peoples of the Earth : ethnonationalism, democracy, and the indigenous challenge in "Latin" America, Martin Edwin Andersen.

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This book explores the culture of indigenous peoples in Latin America, the fundamental challenges they offer to traditional Euro-American notions of democracy, citizenship and develop the interface of these topics

This book explores the culture of indigenous peoples in Latin America, the fundamental challenges they offer to traditional Euro-American notions of democracy, citizenship and develop the interface of these topics. Saved in: Main Author: Andersen, Martin Edwin. Other Authors: EBSCO Publishing (Firm).

Martin Edwin Andersen is an Assistant Professor of National Security Affairs in the Center for Hemispheric Defense .

Martin Edwin Andersen is an Assistant Professor of National Security Affairs in the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies at the National Defense University. His most recent book is Peoples of the Earth: Ethnonationalism, Democracy, and the Indigenous Challenge in Latin America (Lexington Books, 2010).

Peoples of the Earth has the potential to become a pioneer study addressing ethnic activism, characterized by multiple, small groups pressing for state recognition and democratic participation, while also promoting a defence of the environment and natural resources

Peoples of the Earth has the potential to become a pioneer study addressing ethnic activism, characterized by multiple, small groups pressing for state recognition and democratic participation, while also promoting a defence of the environment and natural resources. Part of its attractiveness is the likelihood that the work will lead to further investigations and will become an authoritative point of departure for the fertile area of ethnonationalism studies in Latin America. Each country chapter provides a succinct but substantial presentation of the basic issue

Peoples of the Earth employs a comparative history of ethno-nationalism to examine Indian activism and its challenges to the political, social and economic status quo in the countries of Central and South America. It explores the intersect between problems of democratic empowerment and security-including the appearance of radical Islam among Indians in two important countries-arising from the re-emergence of dormant forms of ethnic militancy and unprecedented internal challenges to nation-states. The institutions and practices of Indian self-government in the United States and Canada are examined as a means of comparison with contemporary phenomena in Central and South America, suggesting frameworks for the successful democratic incorporation of the region's most disenfranchised peoples. European models emerging from "intermestic" dilemmas are considered, as are those involving the Inuit people (or Eskimos) in the Canadian far north, as policymakers there "think outside the box" in ways that include more robust roles for both sub-national and international bodies. Finally, the work challenges policymakers to broaden the debate about how to approach the issues of political and economic empowerment and regional security concerning Native peoples, to include consideration of new ways of protecting both land rights and the environment, thus avoiding a zero-sum solution between the region's 40 million Indians and the rest of its peoples.

Peoples of the Earth has the potential to become a pioneer study addressing ethnic activism, characterized by multiple, small groups pressing for state recognition and democratic participation, while also promoting a defence of the environment and natural resources. Part of its attractiveness is the likelihood that the work will lead to further investigations and will become an authoritative point of departure for the fertile area of ethnonationalism studies in Latin America. Each country chapter provides a succinct but substantial presentation of the basic issues and challenges facing the Native peoples of the country. Overall, the book has an excellent mix of historical and contemporary analysis.


Comments: (3)

Gietadia
Martin Andersen's book is timely, well research, and well written. This book is essential for anyone who is interested in understanding the politics of ethnic nationalism in Latin America, and by extension the developing world. Andersen makes extensive use of primary and secondary sources to weave an interesting and thoughtful narrative that analyzes the roots of ethnic nationalism in Latin America, and places key national cases into comparative perspective. The book's interdisciplinary approach helps it bridge various academic traditions, and provides a more comprehensive picture of this most important topic. Understanding ethnic nationalism is essential to understanding politics in contemporary Latin America; from the rise of Evo Morales in Bolivia to civil wars in Peru and Guatemala, ethnic nationalism has been at the heart of social and revolutionary movements in the region for the past 50 years. Finally, Andersen addresses the critical, but seldom touched, issue of the connection between current security problems and explicitly ethnic nationalist appeals. The concerns in this area go far beyond irrendist movements, and may affect questions of terrorism and territorial integrity. Andersen's book is an essential component for those interested in the answer to a fundamental question for Latin American politics: How do countries incorporate ethnic groups (in some cases forming majorities of the population) into the political, social and economic life of the nation-state while maintaining political stability and territorial integrity? How nations respond to that challenge will affect the prospects for democratic regimes in Latin America.
Coidor
Andersen's book will make many people uncomfortable, but it is also required reading for those who are interested in security and indigenous issues in Latin America. His central point is that if long neglected indigenous grievances are not addressed soon in a fair and balanced manner, the result could be a new round of ethnic conflicts and bloodletting with serious consequences for the estimated 40 million Native Americans remaining. This security focus on the issue of ethnicity in the Americas is novel and long overdue, as it indicates how resolving the indigenous issue is in the national self-interest of regional governments.

Andersen is one of the few who dares question the indigenous credentials of Bolivian President Evo Morales, showing how the Bolivian MAS is really a mestizo (mixed race with a European cultural orientation) Marxist organization that has used the indigenous issue as a smokescreen to propel itself to power. Rather than unify the country a la Nelson Mandela, the Morales government has fomented division by encouraging reverse racism, indigenous persecution of European-descended Bolivians who represent the majority of Morales ideological opposition, while at the same time excluding truly indigenous leaders from the top levels of government in favor of European and mestizo leaders and advisers who share his Marxist ideology.

Andersen also develops an excellent discussion on the penetration of radical Islam among indigenous communities, a recent and still isolated phenomenon whose potential for growth and impact can be exponential if solutions are not found and the spiral of conflict keeps escalating.
misery
Peoples of the Earth: Ethnonationalism, Democracy, and the Indigenous Challenge in "Latin'' America by Martin Edwin Andersen presents a fascinating and comprehensive perspective on Latin American history focusing on the lesser told but nonetheless important story of indigenous rights across the hemisphere.

This comparative study presents a sweeping journey across the Americas, from end to end, with important insights for the fields of indigenous studies, comparative politics, and strategic studies, helping to rebalance the field of 'Latin' American studies so that it includes the indigenous 'Peoples of the Earth' who survived the arrival of European settlers and conquerors, and who have long been a submerged but potent political force that is now emerging to transform the political dynamics of many Central and South American nations, united in their aspiration to reclaim their often unacknowledged, and at times suppressed, contribution to the history and politics of our hemisphere.

One of this book's many strengths is its sheer breadth of study, chock-full of country case studies based on meticulous research, with impressive use of sources. The author is familiar with 'Latin' America, having covered the region as a journalist and author, with two prior books published on the region's political and military history. Peoples of the Earth combines his wealth of knowledge and insight spanning numerous countries, primarily in Central and South America but with insights also drawn from the struggles of Native peoples in the United States and Canada. This makes for fascinating comparative observations and analyses, connecting a long series of dots dating back half a millennium and stretching from the high north to the far south, in a rare but much needed retelling of the story of the 'New World.'

Andersen's work follows impressively in the tradition of esteemed scholars like Donna Lee Van Cott, author of Radical Democracy in the Andes and From Movements to Parties in Latin America: The Evolution of Ethnic Politics. To his credit, Andersen writes an engaging, lively, non-ideological, terminologically-uncluttered language that will make this work appeal beyond the narrow confines of the 'Latin' American studies subfield of political science. This work deserves a broad readership both within and beyond academia. Peoples of the Earth will help to offset the dearth of literature addressing the issue of native rights from a broad, and comprehensive, perspective.

The narrative flows naturally and smoothly, and with a rapid pace and energetic style making the manuscript a delight to read, blending the best of academic analysis with a refreshing journalistic pacing. For those with an interest in the indigenous chapters of inter-American history, this will be a true page-turner. Andersen's scholarship is sound, and the research that went into this book is meticulous and comprehensive, showing a unique depth and breadth of knowledge. The author brings in a wide range of sources including numerous classic works from the fields of Latin American and indigenous studies, as well as blending additional contemporary observations from journalists, columnists, native rights activists, tribal law practitioners, and indigenous leaders -- augmenting secondary sources with fresh current affairs insights and primary perspectives. The breadth of sources enriches the depth of storytelling, with numerous examples and anecdotes provided throughout.

The work's historical depth is impressive, incorporating not just current texts but reaching back to numerous classics and earlier events in the history that have informed the historical development of the Americas, including the emergence of the modern state system as well as the influences of other international dynamics including the worldwide struggle against fascism and the abhorrent racial policies that drove aggression during World War II as well as the long and painful legacy of colonial history and the perpetuation of colonial-era social divisions into the contemporary period in the New World that pitted indigenous interests against those of the newcomers. The author's historical expertise, intimate regional awareness, and comprehensive knowledge of the literature is evident throughout. The documentation of the sources used is also impressive, with the lengthy bibliography chock-full of important sources, including a rich and comprehensive assortment of books, journal articles, news articles, and author interviews in addition to government reports. Numerous and highly detailed endnotes are a further reflection of the depth of scholarship and the meticulousness of the author's research.

This book will be of interest to scholars, researchers, policy analysts, policy makers, governmental decision-makers, and indigenous rights activists in the Americas as well as in other regions such as Asia, Africa and Oceania where similar issues and challenges exist. It will also be of interest to cultural anthropologists and human terrain mapping specialists thrust into the world's hot spots and endeavoring to navigate their complex ethnocultural undercurrents and forge sub-state coalitions with tribal and local communities, often discovering much untold, and untaught, history along the way. Peoples of the Earth makes important contributions to the literatures of several distinct subfields -- notably native studies, Latin American studies, and comparative politics -- as well as strategic and security studies, with relevance to the ongoing GWOT struggle and the many ethnic and civil conflicts around the world where indigenous people continue to struggle to assert their rights, and to protect their proud cultural traditions, from the more populous, modern state.

What is refreshing to this reader is the author's openness to literature not only from different fields, but also from a wide range of ideologies and worldviews, revealing an openness to diversity that enriches the analysis considerably. This work breaks free from any singular ideological lens and reframes indigenous history, culture and tradition as the center of the story. The tone and presentation are both balanced and fair, and the historical detail combines for a unique and much needed contribution to the field. This work deserves to be widely read, from the classroom to the forward operating base, and to remain in print for many years to come, as it fills a need in the field for such a holistic and comprehensive approach to state-tribe relations, in the Americas and around the world.

Barry Zellen is the author of Breaking the Ice: From Land Claims to Tribal Sovereignty in the Arctic;On Thin Ice: The Inuit, the State, and the Challenge of Arctic Sovereignty; and On Thin Ice: The Inuit, the State, and the Challenge of Arctic Sovereignty.
Peoples of the Earth: Ethnonationalism, Democracy, and the Indigenous Challenge in "Latin'' America download epub
Humanities
Author: Martin Edwin Andersen
ISBN: 0739143913
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Lexington Books (February 15, 2010)
Pages: 300 pages