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At Home Abroad: Identity and Power in American Foreign Policy (Cornell Studies in Political Economy) download epub

by Richard C. Leone,Henry R. Nau


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At Home Abroad: Identity. has been added to your Cart. When Henry R. Nau writes about America in this intriguing book, his profound ideas and incisive explanations sweep across the landscape of American foreign policy

At Home Abroad: Identity. Nau writes about America in this intriguing book, his profound ideas and incisive explanations sweep across the landscape of American foreign policy. Everyone who wants or needs to understand who Americans are, where they are headed, and why, would be rewarded by spending a few hours with this volume, which is especially pertinent to the era that began on September 11, 2001. Series: Cornell Studies in Political Economy.

The United States has never felt at home abroad. Other books in the series. Cornell Studies in Political Economy (1 - 10 of 119 books). Books by Henry R. Nau. More. Cornell Studies in Political Economy (1 - 10 of 119 books)

In At Home Abroad, Henry R. Nau explains that America is still unique but no longer so very different. In Europe, the identity and power perspective advocates .

In At Home Abroad, Henry R. support for both NATO expansion to consolidate democratic identities in eastern Europe and concurrent, but separate, great-power cooperation with Russia in the United Nations.

The reason for this unease, even after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, is not frequent threats to American security. Publisher:Cornell University Press.

book by Richard C. Leone. The United States has never felt at home abroad  . The reason for this unease, even after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, is not frequent threats to American security. It is America's identity. The United States, its citizens believe, is a different country, a New World of divided institutions and individualistic markets surviving in an Old World of nationalistic governments and statist economies.

CHAPTER ONE Identity and Power: The Sources of National Interest. foreign policy in the twenty-first century depends as much on identity change in the United States and other countries as it does on external geopolitical circumstances.

Henry r. CHAPTER ONE Identity and Power: The Sources of National Interest. Indeed, domestic change is often the primary source of external power shifts. Power in the information age is generated by internal economic and technological development more than by external acquisition of foreign markets or resources.

Henry Nau takes his stab at resolving this dilemma with the thoughtful At. .

Henry Nau takes his stab at resolving this dilemma with the thoughtful At Home Abroad. For Nau, national identity is a vital factor in the formation of a nation's foreign policy, though it is often overlooked in favor of measures of national power. In At Home Abroad, he ties the two together in what he calls the "identity and power approach" to studying foreign policy. In Nau's framework, identity can converge or diverge, and power is possessed equally or unequally. When identity converges and power is equal, the result is a security community, such as the European Union or the G-7. When identity converges but power is unequal, there is a hierarchy.

By Henry R. Ithaca, . Cornell University Press, 2002. The author includes a critical "but," however: "America has never felt at home abroad," Nau declares, because Americans see themselves as separate from the rest of the world. Nau wrote about America in this intriguing book, he filled pages with profound ideas and incisive explanations as he swept across the landscape of American foreign policy. It is especially pertinent to the era that began on 11 September 2001.

At Home Abroad: Identity and Power in American Foreign Policy . 1992- On leave to write a book on American foreign policy 1994 entitled At Home Abroad: Identity and Power in American Foreign.

At Home Abroad: Identity and Power in American Foreign Policy (Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 2002), 314 pp. Also published in Japanese as Amerika no Taigai Kanyo Aidentiti to Pawa. 1992- On leave to write a book on American foreign policy 1994 entitled At Home Abroad: Identity and Power in American Foreign Policy. Supported by the The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation and The Century Foundation (formerly The Twentieth Century Fund).

Political economy is the study of production and trade and their relations with law, custom and government; and with the distribution of national income and wealth. As a discipline, political economy originated in moral philosophy, in the 18th century, to explore the administration of states' wealth, with "political" signifying the Greek word polity and "economy" signifying the Greek word "okonomie" (household management).

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The United States has never felt at home abroad. The reason for this unease, even after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, is not frequent threats to American security. It is America's identity. The United States, its citizens believe, is a different country, a New World of divided institutions and individualistic markets surviving in an Old World of nationalistic governments and statist economies. In this Old World, the United States finds no comfort and alternately tries to withdraw from it and reform it. America cycles between ambitious internationalist efforts to impose democracy and world order, and more nationalist appeals to trim multilateral commitments and demand that the European and Japanese allies do more.In At Home Abroad, Henry R. Nau explains that America is still unique but no longer so very different. All the industrial great powers in western Europe (and, arguably, also Japan) are now strong liberal democracies. A powerful and peaceful new world exists beyond America's borders and anchors America's identity, easing its discomfort and ending the cycle of withdrawal and reform.Nau draws on constructivist and realist perspectives to show how relative national identities interact with relative national power to define U.S. national interests. He provides fresh insights for U.S. grand strategy toward various countries. In Europe, the identity and power perspective advocates U.S. support for both NATO expansion to consolidate democratic identities in eastern Europe and concurrent, but separate, great-power cooperation with Russia in the United Nations. In Asia, this perspective recommends a shift of U.S. strategy from bilateralism to concentric multilateralism, starting with an emerging democratic security community among the United States, Japan, South Korea, Australia, New Zealand, India, and Taiwan, and progressively widening this community to include reforming ASEAN states and, if it democratizes, China. In the developing world, Nau's approach calls for balancing U.S. moral (identity) and material (power) commitments, avoiding military intervention for purely moral reasons, as in Somalia, but undertaking such intervention when material threats are immediate, as in Afghanistan, or material and moral stakes coincide, as in Kosovo.


At Home Abroad: Identity and Power in American Foreign Policy (Cornell Studies in Political Economy) download epub
Humanities
Author: Richard C. Leone,Henry R. Nau
ISBN: 0801439310
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (February 25, 2002)
Pages: 336 pages