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Christian Preaching: A Trinitarian Theology of Proclamation download epub

by Michael Pasquarello III


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Preface: on changing the subject Introduction: speaking of God: preaching at the "end of religion" Speaking of God . Download book Christian preaching : a Trinitarian theology of proclamation, Michael Pasquarello III. online for free.

Preface: on changing the subject Introduction: speaking of God: preaching at the "end of religion" Speaking of God: preaching as a theological practice Speaking of God: preaching as a traditioned practice Speaking of God: preaching as an ecclesial practice Speaking of God: preaching as a pastoral practice Speaking of God: preaching as a Scriptural practice Speaking of God: preaching as a beautiful practice. Speaking of God: preaching as a pilgrim practice Epilogue. Start by marking Christian Preaching: A Trinitarian Theology Of Proclamation as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Michael Pasquarello II. Download PDF book format

Michael Pasquarello II. Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Preface: on changing the subject Introduction: speaking of God: preaching at the "end of religion" Speaking of God: preaching as a theological practice Speaking of God: preaching as a traditioned practice Speaking of God: preaching as an ecclesial practice Speaking of God: preaching as a pastoral practice Speaking of God: preaching as a Scriptural practice Speaking of God: preaching as a beautiful practice.

Christian Preaching : A Trinitarian Theology of Proclamation. Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13: 9781610972550.

Michael Pasquarello III (PhD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) is Granger E. and Anna A. Fisher Professor of Preaching at Asbury . He is the author of Christian Preaching: A Trinitarian Theology of Proclamation. Fisher Professor of Preaching at Asbury Theological Seminary. Paperback: 152 pages. Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub (June 1, 2012).

Christian Preaching: A Trinitarian Theology of Proclamation. In Christian Preaching, Michael Pasquarello attempts to address the problem of preaching in many contemporary Christian churches. Pasquarello sees the problem stemming from the fact that today churches (and, subsequently, pastors) are more interested in the number of people coming to church than they are in the message being preached in the church. Pasquarello believes this has resulted in the practice of reducing preaching to a set of forms and methods that get people in the doors.

A Trinitarian Theology of Proclamation. by Michael Pasquarello III. Published January 1, 2007 by Baker Academic.

Next Pasquarello describes Bonhoeffer’s maturation as a preacher-his crafting a homiletic theology, as well as preaching’s relationship to politics and public confession. Pasquarello follows Bonhoeffer’s forced itinerancy until he became, ultimately, a preacher without any congregation at all. In the end, Bonhoeffer’s life was his best sermon. Dietrich presents Bonhoeffer as an exemplar in the preaching tradition of the church.

Christian Preaching: A Trinitarian Theology of Proclamation by Mike Pasquarello. Toward a Trinitarian Theology of Liturgical Participation (Paperback or Softback.

There are many books that give preachers hints about engaging speaking or methods for creating sermons. This homiletics primer focuses not on the "how to" of preaching but on the theological foundation of the very act of preaching itself, introducing students and pastors to a thorough understanding of why they preach or will preach. Michael Pasquarello III takes a biblical and historical look at preaching, calling all preachers to think theologically, regardless of denomination, audience, or preaching style, when they proclaim the Word of God. Each chapter concludes with a sermon example that shows the practical way that such theology works itself into the pulpit.

Comments: (2)

Hunaya
Michael Pasquarello III's Christian Preaching: A Trinitarian Theology of Proclamation (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2006) seeks to fund "a theological vision of preaching that calls the church to its primary vocation: to turn from idolatry (perhaps no more subtly and therefore dangerously present than in the zealous pursuit of cultural relevance - across the theological spectrum) to the worship of the Triune God, which is the necessary condition for hearing and responding to God's self-communication in Christ." (15)

Pasquarello writes self-consciously from "within a theological tradition that acknowledges that throughout most of Christian history the practice of preaching was believed to take place in, with, and through the initiative and activity of the Triune God" (13) and seeks to accomplish his goal through "an extended conversation regarding matters integral to preaching within the trinitarian `grammar' of faith confessed by the church: preaching as a theological practice; preaching as a traditioned practice; preaching as an ecclesial practice; preaching as a pastoral practice; preaching as a scriptural practice; preaching as a beautiful practice; and preaching as a pilgrim practice." (17)

In Christian Preaching, Pasquarello sets a scattered approach to an extended conversation on preaching in which he seeks to ground the practice of preaching in historical Christian thought. While offering rich resources for further study, Pasquarello is as difficult to summarize or cull sound-bites from as Karl Barth or Walter Brueggemann. The depth and breadth of what Christian Preaching seeks to do makes it difficult to judge the success with which it does so.

Immediately following an extended critique in the introduction of Charles Finney, particularly his modern day progeny Rick Warren with his "theologically unmediated, ecclesially decontextualized form of life abstracted from `the rough ground' of the church's history, tradition, and concrete existence in the world," Pasquarello offers a complete chapter on "preaching as theological practice" which even after reading multiple times I still can not flesh into a concrete alternative to the approaches of Rick Warren and Charles Finney before him. Christian Preaching may lay a historical or theoretical basis for a trinitarian alternative, but it is not certain that it ever comes down out of the clouds to where tires meet asphalt to move the car down the road in a discernible way.

The strength of Pasquarello's work lies in his diagnosis of what is wrong with the church and Christian preaching and with his bringing of historical resources to bear in widening the conversation or "changing the subject." He deftly dissects Rick Warren's hermeneutics, the market-driven church, American religious idolatry, and the "relevance" which seems to stand as the antithesis of what he is advocating. Pasquarello introduces readers to significant bodies of thought from Augustine, Hauerwas, Irenaeus, Luther, and Willimon among others.

Christian Preaching is not for the faint of heart, and is far more likely to provoke questions than provide answers for the average reader. With so many excellent critiques of the American religious scene and compelling approaches to trinitarian preaching on the market, I can not recommend this book with a straight face to my sisters and brothers who work in the parish and pulpit. If you read Pasquarello's work, prepare to do your own work and discover some rich resources in the process.
Usaxma
Pasquarello should be commended for advocating a God-centered preaching methodology, and for pointing out the dangers of an anthropocentric frame of mind. However, what much of this book reduces to is a series of straw man arguments and logical non sequiturs. These straw man arguments are mostly against contemporary models of proclamation such as "Church Growth" and "seeker sensitive" models. Indeed, he exhibits almost a sadistic pleasure in his sustained attack on them throughout the book addressing, and re-addressing mostly the negative extremes to which these approaches can be taken. While he is on target with some of his criticisms, most of them are based on severely mistaken assumptions of why these churches do what they do.

One would expect such a sustained attack on these models to, at least at some point, wrestle with the positive qualities of contemporary models. Yet Pasquerello fails throughout to even glance at anything positive; for example, the demonstrable fact that there are scores of people now in fellowship with Christ and the Church who would never have even considered approaching otherwise. Moreover, while Pasquerello seeks a doxological model of preaching, he fails to recognize the inherently doxological quality of evangelistic models: these formerly unchurched people have now become, and are becoming more and more "living sacrifices" that are a fragrant aroma to the Lord. The appropriate response to the failures of contemporary models is not to anathematize them tout court, but to reflectively consider how they can be formed more perfectly. A lack of this recognition evinced by Passquarello will no doubt change very few minds who follow contemporary models.

The non sequiturs and false conclusions in this book are many. Passquarello establishes "church growth" models of preaching and worship as antithetical to a "Trinitarian" focus, yet he simply does not provide sufficient exegetical or historical support for this, resulting in conclusions that do not follow his premises. While Pasquarello attempts for a more transcendentally-oriented theology of preaching, he ends in what seems to be a total rejection of any value that may come from general revelation (e.g., in the sciences, economics, etc.). His assumption is that any implementation of "natural" methodologies must be a rejection of good theology. He apparently forgets that the God of Christianity is also the Creator of the Cosmos and the philanthropist who bestowed whatever "good gifts" are found therein.

While he grasps the doctrine of Trinity, he apparently does not recognize the implications the doctrine of incarnation has upon the natural world when the divine logos entered into His own physical creation. In a gesture of absurd irony, at one point Pasquarello criticizes the utilization of technology (such as PowerPoint, lights, etc.) by saying that it reduces Christianity to a "gnostic message that separates the form of the gospel from its content." What he apparently fails to realize is that such technology when used in this way is does "separate," but is integrative, getting more of the senses of the human flesh involved in the process of Gospel proclamation--eyes as well as ears. In contrast, a truly gnostic approach to preaching, would seem would seek to eliminate all physical and non-spiritual elements as possible, focusing exclusively on the "spiritual." Indeed, it seems that Pasquarello's exclusively oral proclamation that is "primarily a theological rather than stylistic matter," centered completely around communicating theological "saving knowledge" (gnosis), would fall much more appropriately under the label "gnostic" than a physically integrative, technological, experiential approach that is not afraid to touch what God has given to us in the physical universe, and using that to help communicate the Gospel message.

Nor does Pasquerello adequately wrestle with the implications the kenosis might ought to have on the shape of preaching, considering how to communicate God's truth to a specific congregation in a specific cultural environment. These are the theological foundations upon which contemporary models of preaching (and church ministry) are built, yet they are not once engaged in this book.

While Pasquerello's attempt to develop a model of preaching is theologically Christian is laudable, his attempt to do so falls flat. It is a myopic theology he propounds. His criticisms, too, fall flat, with the result of a text that is both hollow and, sadly, uncharitable.
Christian Preaching: A Trinitarian Theology of Proclamation download epub
Humanities
Author: Michael Pasquarello III
ISBN: 0801027608
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Baker Academic (January 1, 2008)
Pages: 224 pages