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Euro Horror: Classic European Horror Cinema in Contemporary American Culture (New Directions in National Cinemas) download epub

by Ian Olney


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Электронная книга "Euro Horror: Classic European Horror Cinema in Contemporary American Culture", Ian Olney

Электронная книга "Euro Horror: Classic European Horror Cinema in Contemporary American Culture", Ian Olney. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Euro Horror: Classic European Horror Cinema in Contemporary American Culture" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

It violently sweeps everything out of your house, so that new joy can find space to enter. It shakes the yellow leaves from the bough of your heart, so that fresh, green leaves can grow in their place. It pulls up the rotten roots, so that new roots hidden beneath have room to grow. Whatever sorrow shakes from your heart, far better things will take their place.

Beginning in the 1950s, "Euro Horror" movies materialized in astonishing numbers from Italy, Spain, and France and popped up in the US at rural drive-ins and urban grindhouse theaters such as those that once dotted New York's Times Square. Gorier, sexier, and stranger than most American horror films of the time, they were embraced by hardcore fans and denounced by critics as the worst kind of cinematic trash.

Euro Horror explores a surprising development in American popular culture: the substantial cult following garnered since the late 1990s by films from the golden age of twentieth-century Continental European horror cinema. Between the mid-1950s and the mid-1980s, these Euro horror movies emerged from countries like Italy, Spain, and France in astonishing numbers and were shown in the United States at rural drive-ins and at urban grindhouse theaters of the sort that once filled Times Square in New York City.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In this volume, Olney explores some of the most popular genres of Euro Horror cinema-including giallo films, named for the yellow covers of Italian pulp fiction, the S&M horror film, and cannibal and zombie films-and develops a theory that explains their renewed appeal to audiences today. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

New Directions in National Cinemas This book does film studies a great service in itsvserious consideration of the art and reception of Euro horror, and offers.

New Directions in National Cinemas. Olney’s wide knowledge and fresh perspective on Euro horror is authoritative and interesting. He complicates conventional views on genre films as well as film criticism in general. This book does film studies a great service in itsvserious consideration of the art and reception of Euro horror, and offers readers much to think about, and explores numerous films that are clearly worthy of further study.

See our disclaimer In this volume, Olney explores some of the most popular genres of Euro . New Directions in National Cinemas (Hardcover).

Euro Horror: Classic European Horror Cinema in Contemporary American Culture (New Directions in National Cinemas). Indiana University Press.

Автор: Olney Ian Название: Euro Horror: Classic European Horror .

2013 Серия: New directions in national cinemas Язык: ENG Издание: Revised and expanded Иллюстрации: 12 b&w illus.

Beginning in the 1950s, "Euro Horror" movies materialized in astonishing numbers from Italy, Spain, and France and popped up in the US at rural drive-ins and urban grindhouse theaters such as those that once dotted New York's Times Square. Gorier, sexier, and stranger than most American horror films of the time, they were embraced by hardcore fans and denounced by critics as the worst kind of cinematic trash. In this volume, Olney explores some of the most popular genres of Euro Horror cinema―including giallo films, named for the yellow covers of Italian pulp fiction, the S&M horror film, and cannibal and zombie films―and develops a theory that explains their renewed appeal to audiences today.


Comments: (3)

Mogelv
After reading other reviews here on this book, I think perhaps unfair reviews, I'll say this: This is an informed and scholarly look into the genre, rich with the author's personal views and perspective. If you are looking for lots of photos, you won't find them here. If, however, you are seeking content, and perhaps to expand your concept of the lines between art, horror, exploitation, and pornography, this book will interest you. One of the roles of cinema history is to share thoughts, observations, theories, and personal perspective... to discuss how these works interpolate into our culture... this is the heartbeat of what some people seek to glean from cinema history writing, while others simply look to validate their own thinking. I know MY own thinking; I enjoy listening to the thinking of others. The film genres discussed in this book were shockingly different than anything before seen in American film, and their influence in our society and film culture are important. They were attacked, labeled as vile, trash, etc... Art ( and what passes as art) often has this effect, and the slow seeping into mainstream film and culture of such work is interesting and important. The author shares his own theories and thinking in these areas. Good writing will cause one to consider new concepts and re-evaluate one's perspective; this book gives us such an opportunity. Whether you agree in the end or not, the author creates a dialog, as you read. Isn't that what a good book is supposed to do? Fans of this genre, and cinema historians will benefit from this work. Dedicated and worthy film historians, in a way, are required to read new work with an open mind, if they themselves are to be taken seriously.
Capella
Fantastic book, excellently written, and well researched.

In strong disagreement with a certain review, this book actually feels like it was written by a fan, for fans of Euro, albeit critical thinking ones. I say this because his introductory section outlining the reemergence of Euro horror both for film critics/scholars, and fans due to the DVD releases of many of these films in the 2000s, evokes memories of myself discovering many of these films as a casual horror fan. It has a certain authenticity about it, and I'm sure many readers would have similar experiences.

Additionally, as a budding scholar myself, this is exactly what I was hoping for. While it could be argued there is a slight excess of content related to the giallo, I think the genre itself is so significant and popular within the overall context of Euro horror, that the decision to include so much on it was justified. Importantly, Olney engages in strong and highly sophisticated textual analysis of films too often ignored by scholars in the past. Most memorably for me, his extensive analysis of Lucio Fulci's The House by the Cemetery (1981), and The New York Ripper (1982) gave original and thought provoking insight into films that are otherwise generally only remembered for gore or supposed misogyny, or have been simply forgotten. Originality is one thing - claiming Ripper is in some ways a feminist film, for example, is quite an original and potentially controversial claim - however actually successfully justifying such a claim is quite another, and Olney achieves this with flying colours. His analysis of Cemetery is equally fascinating.

While I admit the claim that Bava and Argento have have been covered (although I might not say extensively), an author such as Alan Jones is more concerned with production processes, historical anecdotes, actor profiles etc. than textual analysis, at least in my experiences. Olney's book is therefore, to me, quite original.

Fantastic book: reading as a fan 4.5/5, as an analyst: 5/5
Mr_Mole
What is it about the Euro Horror genre that keeps breeding useless books on the subject. Don't let the cover fool you, here we have another overblown ego trip similar to author Mikel Kovan's 'LA DOLCE MORTE' in that the author covers the same ground as before. The works of Mario Bava and Dario Argento have been covered extensively by such authors as Alan Jones ,Tim Lucas and an overall view in the wonderful 'SPAGHETTI NIGHTMARES' by Luca Palmerini and Gaetano Mistretta. We really do not need half a book going over the same territory. What makes it worse is that the first half of the book covers the psychological implications of the European exploitation film utilizing view points and criticisms by other inflated egotists and unless you have a degree in psychology or business administration, you will be using this work as a good cure for insomnia for its not very useful for fans of Euro Horror looking for guidance to some of the best titles in the genre. I wish I would have seen the other review by The Explorator before I purchased this. It would have saved me money and time. We are not all scholars looking for intellectual stimulation, all we fans want is a nice overall view of the Euro Horror genre which covers every theme be it nunsploitation, Nazi Crime, or the Giallo. I just might have to bite the bullet and write one myself. As for now, this book can join Kovan's as a missed opportunity until the right one comes along. The two stars are for the coverage of a few selected titles by Directors Sergio Martino and Jess Franco but even that is not worth the books price. Recommended for Film Scholars(?) and eggheads only.
Euro Horror: Classic European Horror Cinema in Contemporary American Culture (New Directions in National Cinemas) download epub
Humanities
Author: Ian Olney
ISBN: 0253006481
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Indiana University Press; Revised and Expanded edition (February 7, 2013)
Pages: 280 pages