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What's Class Got to Do With It?: American Society in the Twenty-First Century download epub

by Michael Zweig


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Michael Zweig effectively challenges the American academic and media orthodoxy that we are a classless society with a. .Envy has, I shamefacedly admit, gotten the best of me in the past. I am sure it will best me in the future.

Michael Zweig effectively challenges the American academic and media orthodoxy that we are a classless society with a small number of rich at the top, a small underclass at the bottom, and a vast middle class that contains most of u.Zweig examines the fallacy of privatization and draws on national and international statistics for data to show that it doesn't work.

Start by marking What's Class Got to Do with It? .

Start by marking What's Class Got to Do with It?: American Society in the Twenty-First Century as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In the first part of the book we see how our. understanding of class can be informed by knowing the operation of race. and gender in our lives.

central importance of class in American life is increasingly obvious for all. to see. Euphemisms about the middle class and consumer society are no. longer persuasive when chief executives pay themselves tens of millions. of dollars while their employees are thrown out of work with ruined pen-. When huge tax cuts go to the richest 1 percent of the population. In the first part of the book we see how our.

American Society in the Twenty-First Century. Whether in regard to the economy or issues of war and peace, class is central to our everyday lives

American Society in the Twenty-First Century. Whether in regard to the economy or issues of war and peace, class is central to our everyday lives. Yet class has not been as visible as race or gender, not nearly as much a part of our conversations and sense of ourselves as these and other 'identities.

Michael Zweig is Professor of Economics and founder of the Center for Study of Working Class Life at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Among his books is The Working Class Majority: America's Best Kept Secret, also from Cornell. Библиографические данные. What's Class Got to Do with It?: American Society in the Twenty-first Century.

Are you sure you want to remove What's Class Got to Do With It? from your list? . American Society in the Twenty-First Century. Published March 31, 2004 by ILR Press.

Are you sure you want to remove What's Class Got to Do With It? from your list? What's Class Got to Do With It? American Society in the Twenty-First Century.

American Society in the Twenty-first Century (Cornell University Press . A. We get trapped in confusions about race and lose sight of class.

American Society in the Twenty-first Century (Cornell University Press, 2004). In the popular imagination and in political campaign speeches the poor usually stands for black and Hispanic or minority. A politics for the vast majority of Americans is hard to dismiss as special interest business as usual.

It focuses on wealth and income inequality in Europe and the United States since the 18th century.

life for Native Americans continues to be characterized by extended-family social obligations .

life for Native Americans continues to be characterized by extended-family social obligations and economic responsibilities. The extended family expects its successful members to help other relatives who are not as fortunate.

"Whether in regard to the economy or issues of war and peace, class is central to our everyday lives. Yet class has not been as visible as race or gender, not nearly as much a part of our conversations and sense of ourselves as these and other identities. We are of course all individuals, but our individuality and personal life chances are shapedlimited or enhancedby the economic and social class in which we have grown up and in which we exist as adults."from the Introduction

The contributors to this volume argue that class identity in the United States has been hidden for too long. Their essays, published here for the first time, cover the relation of class to race and gender, to globalization and public policy, and to the lives of young adults. They describe how class, defined in terms of economic and political power rather than income, is in fact central to Americans everyday lives. Whats Class Got to Do with It? is an important resource for the new field of working class studies.


Comments: (4)

Dawncrusher
Good book for those of us who struggle to keep up and who believe we nice guys are always finishing last. The Great State of Wisconsin is struggling with this very same issue right now.
Yozshujinn
I was very please with all aspects of my purchase. The book is one I needed for my academic studies.
Small Black
"The long silence about class in the United States is finally coming to an end" (Zweig 1).

That assuming opening sentence deprived me of a text-to-self connection considering that, for the 41 years of my life as an unadulterated American, I've heard nothing but soak-the-rich rhetoric from politicians. Also, in my not-so-proud moments I have made digs about someone else's wealth which was, invariably, more than mine. Envy has, I shamefacedly admit, gotten the best of me in the past. I am sure it will best me in the future.

"Capitalists have their think tanks devoted to strategic matters, places like the Heritage Foundation, the Cato Institute, the Brookings Institution" (15).

The above example of systrophe-the layering of definition-deficient descriptors-is repeated on page 123:

"Heritage Foundation, the Cato Institute, the Hudson Institute, the American Enterprise Institute, and the Manhattan Institute."

Funny, the Manhattan Institute's house organ, City Journal (CJ), is one of my favorite publications. CJ contributors include the seminal sociologist James Q. Wilson, whose Broken Windows Theory has had an incalculable influence on New York City's crime rate - currently the lowest since reliable stats have been kept. Now that's class.

"It is for this reason that capitalism is correctly described as an amoral system. There is no morality contained in it" (36).

The assertion that there is no morality in capitalism would certainly be news to Adam Smith, who demonstrated quite lucidly that the conscience of capitalism -- self-interest -- acts as the midwife for honesty and trust.

"[F]reedom is ultimately a matter of mutual care and social solidarity" (59).

Some would argue that freedom is a matter of rule of law. I am content with my family, however, for providing me with mutual care and with my friends for providing social solidarity.

"For the vast majority of minority and poor children there is a program known as 'Success for All,' which consists of drilling and repetition according to a down-to-the-minute schedule" (117).

Let me get some of that. I will use it on my subliterate 14-year-olds, who would only benefit from drills, i.e., doing the same thing over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over until they can competently read and write. I'd have them do it in uniforms too. All it takes is a "preoccupation with order," which Piven pointedly pooh-poohs (117).

Ultimately, what should be done?

"It must be transformative" (43). "[S]purn bourgeois selfishness" (48). "[D]ifferent mode of production" (63). "[C]ounterhegemonic class consciousness" (76).

Maybe next time I'm washing down my Big Mac with Coca-Cola on Queens Boulevard I'll bring up the subject of counterhegemonic class consciousness with-whoever these people are-"workers of color" (42).

Then again maybe I won't.
Aurizar
This collection of essays addresses an often overlooked aspect of American culture: class. The introduction makes a good case that class is really more about power than money, but the other essays do not always pick up on this theme. The essays do cover a lot of ground, so consider it an introduction to the topic. Except for the last powerful essay by Barbara Jensen the authors of the book seem to be addressing an academic audience, and perhaps college students will get the most out of it. Jensen's essay is both personal and practical. She tells us what it's like for a working class woman in college to feel both the positive and negative effects of class. She opened the eyes of this middle class reader to see, without guilt, how the world can be viewed differently under the lens of class. Everyone, regardless of their class, has something to learn from this book.
What's Class Got to Do With It?: American Society in the Twenty-First Century download epub
Humanities
Author: Michael Zweig
ISBN: 0801442591
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Ilr Pr (March 31, 2004)
Pages: 240 pages