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by Stjepan Mestrovic


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Genocide After Emotion book. The failure to adequately respond on the part of the major Western.

Stjepan Gabriel Meštrović (born 1955), is an American sociologist and an expert in war crimes.

In Genocide after Emotion Mestrovic and the contributors thoroughly interrogate the war, its media coverage and response in the West.

First Published 1996. In Genocide after Emotion Mestrovic and the contributors thoroughly interrogate the war, its media coverage and response in the West. The result is alarming, both for the progress of the war and for the condition of our society today: the authors argue that the West is suffering from a "postemotional" condition - we are beyond caring about anything anymore.

In Genocide after Emotion Mestrovic and the contributors thoroughly interrogate the war, its media coverage and response in the West

In Genocide after Emotion Mestrovic and the contributors thoroughly interrogate the war, its media coverage and response in the West. We provide complimentary e-inspection copies of primary textbooks to instructors considering our books for course adoption. Request an e-inspection copy.

Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781136163562, 1136163565. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780415122931, 0415122937. Note that the availability of products for purchase is based on the country of your billing address. Some items may have regional restrictions for purchase. Canadian customers may purchase from our stores in Canada or the US. Canada.

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Genocide After Emotion: The Post-Emotional Balkan War, says nothing about Mostar, fourth-largest city and once a symbol of multi-ethnic amity.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Genocide After Emotion: Post-emotional Balkan War by. .In Gecide after Emotion Mestrovic and the contributors thoroughly interrogate the war, its media coverage and response in the West

In Gecide after Emotion Mestrovic and the contributors thoroughly interrogate the war, its media coverage and response in the West. The result is alarming, both for the progress of the war and for the condition of our society today: the authors argue that the West is suffering from a postemotional condition - we are beyond caring about anything anymore.

The failure to adequately respond on the part of the major Western superpowers to the atrocities in the Balkans constitutes a major moral and political scandal. In Genocide after Emotion Mestrovic and the contributors thoroughly interrogate the war, its media coverage and response in the West. The result is alarming, both for the progress of the war and for the condition of our society today: the authors argue that the West is suffering from a "postemotional" condition - we are beyond caring about anything anymore.

Comments: (4)

Qucid
Since this book is a compilation of articles by a number of authors, its overall quality is necessarily unbalanced: some contributions are much better than others. Really the most interesting piece is by the book's editor, Mestrovic, who wrote the introduction (and the epilogue). In it he introduces the concepts of "postemotionalism," which roughly refers to the concept of viewing current events through the prism of emotionally-charged events, and even misconceptions, of the past. In the specific case of the Balkan Wars of the 1990s, this means the widespread practice of viewing the current wars through the prism of World War II events in Yugoslavia. This, Mestrovic and several other authors imply, led to the de facto support of the Serbian side (who they view as the primary aggressors in the current wars) on the part of the international community. However, after Mestrovic's introduction, the other chapters are generally not as strong, or interesting. Those written by Philip Cohen, Norman Cigar and James Sadkovich--all dealing with the wartime events and media coverage of 1990-1992, are actually dated since their conclusions and predictions have generally been contradicted by subsequent events. The Sadkovich piece is also a bit tedious, as he meticulously details and criticizes American media coverage without offering much in the way of analysis. The text is also riddled with footnotes (of which there are 17 pages for a less than 30-page article). Since this book was published in 1996, it's surprising that the editor didn't ask the authors of these pieces to update them. Also of interest is the contribution by sociologist Slaven Letica, who reviews the development of nationalism among the Serbs during the 1980s from a psychological aspect. Despite the pretentious and jargon-filled introduction, it provides some good insight into the immediate reasons behind the conflict in Yugoslavia. All in all, the book is interesting because it offers a point of view that differs from that generally presented by the Western media, and Mestrovic's "postemotional" concept seems quite valid. However, at places the criticism of Serbian culpability is excessive, while there is also some unnecessary exculpation of Croatian actions. However, as criticism of Western, and especially American, attitudes and responses to the Balkan Wars, the book is often right on the mark.
Varshav
This book is clearly one-sided, not to mention extremely dated. I will deal with each chapter individually.

First of all, Mestrovic's introduction is probably the best chapter in the book because it is civilized and does not proceed by spewing hatred onto paper. Saying this, however, it still fails to adequately criticise all non-Serbian participants in the war.

Philip Cohen's chapter is unbelievably exaggerated and biased. For example, he states that Serbian irregulars were looting, raping and killing Albanians in Kosovo PRIOR to armed hostilities which erupted in Kosovo during 1997/98. He then claims that at the time of writing (1993/94) Kosovo's population was 93% Albanian. Again, another exaggeration, since at the time Serbs constituted 10% of Kosovo's population and what about the other minorities i.e. Turks, Muslim Slavs and Romas?

Norman Cigar's chapter is also one of the better ones, dealing with the Serb-Croat war in Croatia during 1991 from a mainly military perspective. He acknowledges that both sides committed war crimes but that the Serbs' were systematic, whereas the Croatian war crimes were not state-sponsored and generally isolated. Again, this just demonstrates how dated this information is, since books have appeared in print convincingly refuting this theory.

Slaven Letica, a former advisor to the late President of Croatia, Franjo Tudjman, also places ALL blame for the war squarely on Milosevic and Belgrade and does not reserve one iota of criticism for Tudjman's HDZ. He claims that in Croatia's constitution, it guaranteed equality for all citizens, including Serbs. Yes, maybe on paper, but in 1992 the EU reported that Croatia still had not conformed to the minimum standards required for protection of human rights. Serbs also lost their status as a constitutional nation in Yugoslavia, and were demoted to a mere "ethnic minority".

Not a very helpful or balanced chapter, to say the least.

James Sadkovich writes about media in the U.S. and how, in his opinion, it did not adequately reserve enough time for the war in the Balkans and generally criticizes the West for not taking enough of a proactive approach in ending the war sooner.

C.G. Schoenfeld's chapter is by far the worst one. A psychiatrist by profession, he attempts to psychoanalyze the behaviour of the Serbs and the West, describing the loss of their morality, Freud's Oedipus Complex, the ego/super-ego and other such things which are completely irrelevant to politics. Everyone who is familiar with Freud and who contains a grain of intelligence, will tell you that Freud was a cocaine addict and that his theories are just bogus, particularly the one about the Oedipus Complex.

He repeats the same things with regards to the Serbs about 25 times in his chapter, almost in complete synchronization to his previous comments i.e. "the Serbians committed mass murders, mass rapes and tortures" It is sufficient to say it a few times at most, not once on every page. He then goes so far as to suggest that the Nazis never destroyed areas of culture, as opposed to the Serbs who bombed Dubrovnik and Vukovar. Is this man being humorous or is he just thick as a brick? What about the Nazis' siege of Leningrad, Stalingrad, the bombing of Belgrade, the Blitz of London, the systematic destruction of synagogues in Germany and other countries? This chapter would almost be humorous, if it wasn't so pathetic.

Igor Primoratz's chapter is valid although I would say that the title of his chapter, "Israel and the Genocide in Croatia" is a vast exaggeration. No one is being tried for "genocide" in Croatia, not even Milosevic himself. I suppose though that this is understandable because it was written at a time when all sorts of distortions and falsehoods were being regurgatated by the media.

All in all, a very disappointing book. I would not recommend it for serious students and scholars of the Balkans.
KiddenDan
The editor develops the theme of `post-emotionalism' (as an alternative to post-modernism), by which he means `the culture industry's manipulation of emotionally charged historical events'. He contributes a stimulating essay on the Orwellian misrepresentation of the Bosnian war in the West, while other contributors range more widely. Especially valuable are the important analysis of the Serbian-Croatian war by Norman Cigar, and a searching study by Igor Primoratz of the way in which the war was misrepresented in Israel.
Genocide after Emotion: The Post-Emotional Balkan War download epub
Humanities
Author: Stjepan Mestrovic
ISBN: 0415122945
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (February 1, 1996)
Pages: 240 pages