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Sufism for Non-Sufis?: Ibn 'Ata' Allah al-Sakandari's Taj al-'Arus download epub

by Sherman A. Jackson


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Sufism for Non-Sufis?: I.has been added to your Cart. This is not a criticism, as clearly it was the author's choice to avoid elaborate academic apparati.

Ibn ‘At·ā’ Allāh al-Sakandarı̄’s Tāj al-‘Arūs By Sherman A. Jackson New York: Oxford University Press. 2012 155 Pages ISBN: 978-0-19-987367-8 Sufism for Non-Sufis? engages the wider debate concerning the legitimacy and practice of Sufism; particularly in modern (or postmodern) North America. In coalition with the translated text, Jackson argues for the existence of a Sufism that avoids the controversial concerns of the discipline’s detractors, and the overemphasis upon Sufism-as-mysticism of proponents.

Sufism for Non-Sufis? book. In his translation and analysis of Ibn 'Ata' Allah al-Sakandari's Taj al-'Arus, Sherman A. Jackson demonstrates that violent, lax, or rigid readings of the texts of Islam are just as much a result of the state of spiritual health, awareness, and fortitude of those who read and deploy them as they are of the substance of the. Qur'an, Sunna, and the teachings of Islam's sages. Sufism for Non-Sufis?

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Few forms of classical Islam are more controversial among modern Muslims than the spiritual discipline known as Sufism.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Yet, in the face of the modern Muslim tendency to limit Islams deployment to the emphatically political, few expressions of the religion could be more central to its spiritual vitality in the modern world.

Its author, Ibn ‘Aṭā’ Allāh al-Sakandarī, was a celebrated Sufi in the premodern tradition of Islam. Given the modern polemic around Sufism, this alone might be enough to discourage many, especially non-Sufis, from taking any interest in such

Its author, Ibn ‘Aṭā’ Allāh al-Sakandarī, was a celebrated Sufi in the premodern tradition of Islam. Given the modern polemic around Sufism, this alone might be enough to discourage many, especially non-Sufis, from taking any interest in such. 1. Throughout this introduction, my use of the term spiritual pays homage to modern convention and recognizes-perhaps more than it should-the modern dichotomy posited between spirituality and materialism.

To this end, al-Sakandari avoids virtually every aspect of Sufism known to raise problems for opponents or non-adepts - theological, institutional, even terminological - instead attempting to cultivate a proper relationship with God, not merely intellectually or theologically but experientially an.

To this end, al-Sakandari avoids virtually every aspect of Sufism known to raise problems for opponents or non-adepts - theological, institutional, even terminological - instead attempting to cultivate a proper relationship with God, not merely intellectually or theologically but experientially and psycho-dynamically. Written in the classical style of spiritual aphorisms, this work is a treasure-trove of classical Islamic spiritual wisdom, free of all of the usual barriers between Sufism and the common believer.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Sufism for Non-Sufis?: Ibn 'Ata' Allah. AbeBooks offers millions of new, used, rare and out-of-print books, as well as cheap textbooks from thousands of booksellers around the world. Publisher: Oxford University Press Publication Date: 2005 Binding: Hardcover Book Condition: Good.

Sufism for Non-­Sufis?: Ibn 'Ata' Allah al-­Sakandari's Taj al-­'Arus by Sherman A. Jackson. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Sherman A. To this end, al-­Sakandari avoids virtually every aspect of Sufism known to raise problems for opponents or non-­adepts - theological, institutional, even terminological - instead attempting to cultivate a proper relationship with God, not merely intellectually or theologically but experientially and psycho-­dynamically.

Sufism for Non-Sufis? Ibn 'Ata' Allah al-Sakandari's Taj al-'Arus. First English translation of an important and popular work by an exceedingly influential pre-modern figure. Demonstrates that the spiritual state of those who employ a religious text is as important as the text itself in determining the social role of the text. Sufism for Non-Sufis? Ibn 'Ata' Allah al-Sakandari's Taj al-'Arus.

Few forms of classical Islam are more controversial among modern Muslims than the spiritual discipline known as Sufism. Yet, in the face of the modern Muslim tendency to limit Islam's deployment to the emphatically political, few expressions of the religion could be more central to its spiritual vitality in the modern world. In his translation and analysis of Ibn 'Ata' Allah al-Sakandari's Taj al-'Arus, Sherman A. Jackson demonstrates that violent, lax, or rigid readings of the texts of Islam are just as much a result of the state of spiritual health, awareness, and fortitude of those who read and deploy them as they are of the substance of the Qur'an, Sunna, and the teachings of Islam's sages.Sufism for Non-Sufis?: Ibn 'Ata' Allah al-Sakandari's Taj al-'Arus shows the effort of a renowned Sufi master (d. 1309 CE) to circumvent the controversies and misunderstandings concerning Sufism to explain Islam's tradition of devotional rectitude, spiritual refinement, and purification of the self to the everyday Muslim. To this end, al-Sakandari avoids virtually every aspect of Sufism known to raise problems for opponents or non-adepts - theological, institutional, even terminological - instead attempting to cultivate a proper relationship with God, not merely intellectually or theologically but experientially and psycho-dynamically. Written in the classical style of spiritual aphorisms, this work is a treasure-trove of classical Islamic spiritual wisdom, free of all of the usual barriers between Sufism and the common believer.

Comments: (6)

Cerekelv
Prof. Jackson's latest translation (see his 2002 translation of a work by al-Ghazali) demonstrates his facility with creating readable translations from medieval Arabic, no small task. His introduction, which certainly did not set out to be exhaustive, allows English speakers with an interest in Islamic/Muslim spirituality to begin to think about how this work might fit into what they already know about Islam, perhaps particularly in the US. For practicing Muslims in the US who may have grown up hearing only Wahhabist perspectives on Sufism, this approach may allow them to see how many ideas from a thirteenth-century Egyptian thinker like Ibn 'Ata' Allah they find in their everyday understandings of Islam. The translation itself is fluid; one might easily read the whole of it in a few hours. The work is in the style of "popular" hadith collections ("40 Hadith") or works on etiquette, like that of al-Bukhari, which by giving the reader a tidbit to consider, force him or her to engage in a process of conscious consideration of what his or her relationship is with the Divine, and how he or she might want to change it. Some of them include basics like not "backbiting" (don't be snarky!) that generally make for a more productive society. Probably every Muslim who reads this for his or her spiritual growth will want to read some sections again and again, and in this sense having one's own copy is worth the (fairly expensive) price. Paragraph 280 (pp. 128-9) is one of my favorites, about not being so consumed with the fly bothering you that you forget the nearby lion.

The original work is available in a number of Arabic editions; Jackson has made no effort here to provide an exhaustive list or address codicologic or authorship questions, in all likelihood in order to avoid cluttering a text for non-specialists. This is not a criticism, as clearly it was the author's choice to avoid elaborate academic apparati.

Those interested in digging more deeply into scholarship on Sufism should take a close look through the footnotes of the introduction, which provide references to many excellent works by scholars who specialize in Sufism. Prof Knysh's overview of Sufism is similarly designed to help beginners situate themselves, and the citations to his work should not be construed as the limit of Jackson's knowledge on the topic.

Those interested in the early Shadiliya or interested Muslim spirituality will want to read this book.
Moronydit
I love this book, its an amazing book of spirituality, and the translation is exceptional. I would definitely recommend any book translated by Dr. Sherman Jackson.
Micelhorav
This is a great read. But don't simply read it, think about it and apply as much of it as you can to your life.
Gralmeena
This book is an important addition to literature on Islam for so many reasons. It offers a unique window into Islamic ethical thought; it presents some of the core teachings of Sufism in a way that is relevant, and not an immediate turn-off, for those who may not be inclined toward Sufism; it offers an expertly done English-language translation of a short, accessible classical text on spirituality and character-building in Islam; and the content of the translation itself is insightful, inspirational, and thought-provoking for both the Sufi adept as well as the casual observer.

In this book, Jackson gives us a translation of The Bride-Groom's Crown, a short manual on Islamic spirituality by the famous Sufi of the Shadhili tariqa, ibn `Ata Allah. He also has a critical introduction at the start of the book that is a must-read for those who have academic or intellectual interest in modern arguments about Sufism in particular or in contemporary Islam more generally.

As for the review written by "Basil," I do not agree at all with its conclusions. The reviewer seems to have made his conclusions based on a haphazard reading of only one section in Jackson's introduction, in which Jackson presents a summary of the major arguments made against Sufism. Nowhere does Jackson say that mysticism is separate from Sufism, nor does he say that there are two different kinds of Sufism (one being mystical, the other focused on character-building). Instead, in his section on "Between Mysticism and Personal Piety," Jackson discusses mysticism and character-building as two different aspects of Sufism as a whole. He specifies these two aspects as a way to point out that while some Muslims may be uncomfortable with the first (mysticism), they would not have a problem with the second (on the development of personal piety). Though some die-hard Sufis may take offense at Jackson mentioning this (as Basil seems to have), this point needs to be made. Jackson seems to be saying that while not everyone would feel comfortable with all that Sufism has to offer, there are critical aspects of it that everyone, and especially every Muslim, should be familiar with.

While Jackson is known for his works on Islamic law, theology, and "Blackamerican Islam," one need not question his academic expertise in Sufism. If there is any doubt as to his qualifications on this topic, the section on "Seminal Themes and Sensibilities" in his introduction makes it amply clear that he knows what he is talking about. Jackson's grasp of some of the most intricate subtleties of Sufi thought is apparent in this section. He brings out the major themes and insights of The Bride-groom's Crown in a way that helps prime the reader for a truly beneficial and well-grounded read through the translation. And if someone is not really interested in all of the contemporary debates on Sufism and mysticism, they can simply skip the Intro and read the translation itself. It is beautiful, and well-worth the read.
SlingFire
This is an exceptionally beautiful piece of text, especially the last ten pages. A book I have revisited several times over the years.
Cordann
A proper representation of the original work aptly reworded into English. A lot of thought was put into the translation and representation of the text and can be clearly seen.
The intro seems to be heavily reliant on a few handful of sources though and might not be the best representation of the Sufi dynamic. Regardless, an enjoyable and at points, entertaining read.
The pricing is a bit steep, also.
Sufism for Non-Sufis?: Ibn 'Ata' Allah al-Sakandari's Taj al-'Arus download epub
Humanities
Author: Sherman A. Jackson
ISBN: 0199873674
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (June 11, 2012)
Pages: 176 pages