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by Andrew Wilson


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Ships from and sold by GEORGE STORE. This indecision between a political science or a pure historical approach produces an uneven, and to me, largely unreadable work.

The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation" by Andrew Wilson is a wonderful introduction to a now well-known country and people. Wilson's purpose, somewhat dissimilar to conventional histories, is to trace the development of the nation and draw distinctions between mythology and history. Russians generally perceive Ukrainians to be a part of their nation, explaining the great sense of loss when, in 1991, Ukraine became independent. Ukrainians consistently make the case that they have a distinct heritage and culture

The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation" by Andrew Wilson is a wonderful introduction to a now well-known country and people. Ukrainians consistently make the case that they have a distinct heritage and culture

Andrew Wilson (born 1961) is a British historian and political scientist specializing in Eastern Europe, particularly Ukraine. The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation, Yale University Press, 2000, xviii, 366p.

Andrew Wilson (born 1961) is a British historian and political scientist specializing in Eastern Europe, particularly Ukraine. He is a Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, and Professor in Ukrainian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at University College London. He wrote The Ukrainians and Virtual Politics: Faking Democracy in the Post-Soviet World  .

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Andrew Wilson's history of Ukraine is unlike any other book written on the subject. It does not attempt to cover the entire history of Ukraine from classical antiquity to the present, like Orest Subtelny's landmark book, Ukraine. Rather, the book's thesis looks backwards from Ukrainian Independence and asks how such a nation came into existence, and weighs its chances for survival. I grew up in a Ukrainian emigre community that taught one rigid perspective on Ukrainian history - the Ukrainian nationalist perspective.

Andrew Wilson is reader in Ukrainian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College, London. Библиографические данные.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Andrew Wilson is reader in Ukrainian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College, London.

The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation. The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation. folkscanomy politics; folkscanomy; additional collections. ark:/13960/t3nw5th6x. Ocr. ABBYY FineReader 1. (Extended OCR).

Andrew Wilson focuses on the complex relations between Ukraine and Russia and explains the different versions of the past propagated by Ukrainians and Russians. He also examines the continuing debates over identity, culture, and religion in Ukraine since its independence in 1991.

Читать бесплатно книгу The Ukrainians. Unexpected nation (Wilson . и другие произведения в разделе Каталог. The Ukrainians : unexpected nation, Andrew Wilson. Доступны электронные, печатные и аудиокниги, музыкальные произведения, фильмы. На сайте вы можете найти издание, заказать доставку или забронировать. Возможна доставка в удобную библиотеку.

This book is the most acute, informed, and up-to-date account available today of Ukraine and its people. Andrew Wilson brings his classic work up to the present, through the Orange Revolution and its aftermath, including the 2006 election, the ensuing crisis of 2007, the Ukrainian response to the Russian invasion of Georgia in 2008, the economic crisis in Ukraine, and the 2009 gas dispute between Russia and Ukraine. It looks forward to the key election in 2010, which will revisit many of the issues that were thought settled in 2004.

 

Praise for earlier editions:

 

“Marvelous. . . . A perfect introduction to a fascinating culture: strongly recommended.” —Library Journal

 

“[A] sweeping introductory examination of Ukrainian identity and history. . . . An exceptional history, the kind that supplies not pat answers but food for thought within a lush context of documented and mythological past.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

 


Comments: (5)

Yalone
I found this to be a disappointing work, and I do not give it two stars lightly. I will outline my reasons below, and the reader can determine whether or not they find the rating to be fair. Before criticizing it, however, I would like to state the positive aspects of this book:

1) Wilson is obviously an unbiased observer and does not have a political agenda or an axe to grind, as so many do in this field.
2) He has done his homework; the research is superb, as is the bibliographical essay.
3) Wilson is extremely strong on Rus and pre-Rus history, leading up to the Imperial Russian era.

Now, the cons, which in my view are decisive.

First, Wilson's work cannot decide if it wants to be a comprehensive history of Ukraine or a geopolitical and ethnographic description of the forces shaping modern Ukraine. This indecision between a political science or a pure historical approach produces an uneven, and to me, largely unreadable work. The first 100 pages or so read like a highly detailed and erudite history of pre-modern Ukraine; the last hundred or so read like a typical scholarly article in a political science journal, replete with useless graphs depicting data that adds nothing to the reader's knowledge.

Secondly, and perhaps more importantly than anything, the lack of a clear approach to his material results in some truly unforgivable oversights. If you are to turn to the index, you will note that "World War II" has only four pages delegated to it - and not four pages of content, but rather four pages where it is mentioned. The Battle for Kiev - in which there were at least 600,000 Soviet casualties - is not even mentioned. The Holodomor famine - what is perhaps the central event in modern Ukrainian history - comes in a little better, sporting a 2.5 page treatment with mentions on 2 other pages. The Holocaust, alas, does not have a single page dedicated to it and is not included in the index. Wilson does acknowledge, in a single paragraph on page 250, that the Jewish population went from some three million to less than 500,000. He does not even acknowledge that they were killed; he rather awkwardly states that half a million "remained".

I understand that the purpose of this book is not to give an in-depth description of the Holocaust in Ukraine or to recount large World War II battles. I harbor no illusions about the intentions of a work subtitled "Unexpected Nation". But this does not negate the fact that Wilson is attempting to paint a historical, political, religious, and ethnic portrait of a modern country, and in doing so he spends approximately 8 pages on what are arguably the most monumental events in that country's history. He gives more space to graphs concerning various branches of the modern Ukrainian church than he does to a famine that killed 2-8 million Ukrainians.

There are nuggets of fine research and writing in this work. As noted above, his treatment of Ukraine's early history is fantastic. This reader, however, cannot escape the impression that Wilson simply decided to write about events and periods that he enjoys working on, negating other, perhaps more consequential historical epochs to the sidelines. This makes for a very uneven work.

In a country that is perpetually trying to redefine, forget, or imagine its past, it is more than slightly ironic that Wilson approaches his subject with a similar pick-and-choose approach. It is my hope these issues are addressed in subsequent editions, or that Serhii Plokhii's upcoming history of Ukraine fills the need for a readable history of Ukraine.
Darksinger
Exhaustive review of Ukrainian history and cultural that contributes to understanding the underlying differences between Ukrainians and Russians as Ukrainians struggle to establish a national identity from fragmented components and differences. In general, Ukrainians were indifferent to political issues that became focused when Russian aggression seized Crimea and causes conflict in eastern regions.
fightnight
Ukraine has become topical and is likely to remain so, yet few outside Eastern Europe really know much about it. Andrew Wilson's book is therefore essential as the reference history on Ukraine, or rather on the Ukrainian national identity. For Ukraine, though it has had multiple predecessors, enjoyed only a very sketchy and intermittent existence as a state until the late twentieth history. Kievan Rus was perhaps to it what the Carolingian Empire is to France or Germany. The seventeenth-century Hejtmanate was short-lived, faction-ridden, and in thrall to the outside powers of Poland and Russia. And the post-WWI Ukrainian republic was soon subsumed into the totalitarian and murderous Soviet Union. Yet through the centuries a Ukrainian language and culture survived, to morph into national aspirations with then advent of modernity, and this is the story that Wilson tells (hence the title The Ukrainians, rather than Ukraine).

Wilson's book is thorough and well-researched, and it is clearly written. Though it contains a lot about the historical past, it is weighted towards the last twenty years, which Wilson, otherwise a University College London lecturer, has evidently witnessed at first hand. It is also cautiously argued and avoids taking sides. A few caveats are nevertheless required. First, The Ukrainians tends to be beholden to the predominant style of cultural history, approaching culture in large measure through the arts. The problem is that one cannot explain how Ukraine came about in its current geographic expression without understanding how a Ukrainian language (or family of dialects) and way of life endured where they did. Novels and abstract paintings are fascinating material, but they barely touched the many Ukrainian villages where, through thick and thin, a bedrock of Ukrainian identity survived through the ages. Wilson does not tell the story of that survival. Second, the last chapters show the mark of multiple editions, and they could have been re-written more substantially as the dust settled on the first few post-independence years, to the reader's benefit. These are nevertheless minor objections, and The Ukrainians is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand what is happening in this politically important country and region.
Tcaruieb
Well written, unbiased and a somewhat concise work considering the book gleans 1,000 years of history. No matter what one's perspective of the complications surrounding the current Ukraine uncertainty and troubles, The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation (updated to 2010) clearly points to the fact that all of the people of Ukraine have suffered far more than most throughout history.
I look forward to an updated edition in a few years and toward a more positive outcome for the country at large.
The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation download epub
Humanities
Author: Andrew Wilson
ISBN: 0300154763
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Yale University Press; 3rd edition (December 8, 2009)
Pages: 416 pages