» » Around the Roman Table: Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome

Around the Roman Table: Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome download epub

by Shaun Whiteside,Patrick Faas


Epub Book: 1836 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1300 kb.

There are many misconceptions about the food of ancient Rome that Faas sets out to correct. Shaun Whiteside has translated many books from French, German, Italian, and Dutch, including works by Freud and Nietzsche.

There are many misconceptions about the food of ancient Rome that Faas sets out to correct. The result is half cookbook, half history book and is entirely fascinating to both chef and antiquarian alike. To read Mr. Faas book is a pleasure, to put it to use requires a certain spirit. David Johnson Washington Times).

Patrick Faas's Around the Roman Table is a smorgasbord of gastronomic wonders and delights In addition to a wealth of material about culinary customs and techniques in ancient Rome, Patrick Faas translated more than 150 Roman recipes and reconstructed them.

Patrick Faas's Around the Roman Table is a smorgasbord of gastronomic wonders and delights. Independent on Sunday. There are many misconceptions about the food of ancient Rome that Faas sets out to correct. Around the Roman Table. In addition to a wealth of material about culinary customs and techniques in ancient Rome, Patrick Faas translated more than 150 Roman recipes and reconstructed them for the modern cook. Here are eight recipes from from the book-from salad to dessert. ƒ ƒ. Columella Salad.

Around the Roman Table book. Shaun Whiteside (Translator). Around the Table of the Romans: Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome. 0226233472 (ISBN13: 9780226233475). Craving dolphin meatballs? Can't find a reliable restaurant.

Request PDF On Mar 27, 2007, Andrew Dalby and others published Around the Roman Table: Food and .

I argue that by the end of the first century bc, coinciding with a time period when the political structure of the region was being significantly reorganized, there was a notable change in dining practices, with a move away from a more communal ethos in dining to one emphasizing the individual.

Booktopia has Around the Roman Table, Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome by Patrick Faas. I should have bought this when I saw it at HPB a couple of years ago. I want to learn how to cook ostrich, peacock, and dormice, who wouldn't? Roma Masası civarında: Antik Roma'da Yiyecek ve Şölen

Faas is an internationally renowned food historian, lecturing and teaching all over the world.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Faas is an internationally renowned food historian, lecturing and teaching all over the world. His column in the Dutch newspaper, Volkskrant, is hugely popular and has been published as a collection with a foreword by Midas Dekkers. A contributor to the Oxford Symposium on Food and History every year, his work in this field is without equal.

Patrick Faas, Shaun Whiteside trans. University of Chicago Press Roman Cookery: Ancient Recipes for Modern Kitchens. University of Chicago Press. An excellent collection of recipes for preparing everyday Roman meals. Julilla Sempronia Magna.

In Ancient Roman times, the dormouse was a delicacy, but these days it's one of the greatest threats to native British . I also learned from conversations with Patrick Faas, author of "Around the Roman Table: Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome.

In Ancient Roman times, the dormouse was a delicacy, but these days it's one of the greatest threats to native British woodland. These rodents strip bark from trees, destroy fruit crops, and, incidentally, chew through the electrical wiring in homes. A dormouse is hard to come by these days, so in this recipe, I marinate chicken drumsticks overnight and call them dormouse (Gliris).

Ancient Roman Feasts and Recipes Adapted for Modern Cooking .

Ancient Roman Feasts and Recipes Adapted for Modern Cooking, by Jon Solomon (1977). A history of Roman food, and then about a hundred Roman recipes you can make. Around the Table of the Romans: Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome, by Patrick Faas (2002). We're trying to go ad-free! Become a supporter now!

Craving dolphin meatballs? Can't find a reliable restaurant for boiled parrot? Have a hankering for jellyfish omelettes, sows' wombs in brine, sheep's brain pate, or stuffed mice? Look no further than Around the Roman Table, a unique hybrid cookbook and history lesson. A portrait of Roman society from the vantage point of the dining table, kitchen, and market stalls, Around the Roman Table offers both an account of Roman eating customs and 150 recipes reconstructed for the modern cook. Faas guides readers through the culinary conquests of Roman invasions—as conquerors pillaged foodstuffs from faraway lands—to the decadence of Imperial Rome and its associated table manners, dining arrangements, spices, seasonings, and cooking techniques. With recipes for such appetizing dishes as chicken galantine with lambs' brains and fish relish, Around the Roman Table is ideal for food aficionados who wish to understand how the desire for power and conquest was manifested in Roman appetites."There are many misconceptions about the food of ancient Rome that Faas sets out to correct. The result is half cookbook, half history book and is entirely fascinating to both chef and antiquarian alike."—Washington Times

Comments: (5)

OwerSpeed
I love this book... it is historikal as well as a recipe book... the stories that accompany the foods are also quite fun!... I owned this book some years ago... travels around the globe sometimes take treasures away... as this wonderful book.... a great recipe book to have in your kitchen--- on top of the frig --- or on the book shelf in the library/den --- or even out on a table so others can enjoy this wonderful little treasure..... danke for publishing this and making it available to the Ganz Welt !!!
Castiel
An entertaining and wide-ranging look at ancient Roman cuisine.

When I decided I needed to know more about food and eating in the ancient world of my own work in progress, I went overboard and ordered three different books on it. When they arrived I had to choose which one to start with. Looking them over, I thought that Patrick Faas’s book would provide the best introduction. Now, although I haven’t read the other two books yet, I feel sure that I chose right.

The other books are primarily cookbooks, and Faas’s book is also that, with plenty of recipes drawn from ancient authors, notably Apicius, who wrote “the only gastronomic cookery book handed down to us from classical antiquity.” But it’s also much more than that. Faas sets the scene by taking us through all the things that surrounded the dishes themselves, starting with a “culinary history” of Rome that looks at the agricultural basis of Roman society and the various influences that affected it, such as Africa and Greece, and other factors such as feast days, philosophy, and sumptuary laws. He moves on to a study of “the meal,” with chapters on table manners, the courses of a meal, the menu, and “the carousal” or drinking party that usually followed a dinner party. The author goes on to discuss Roman wine and other drinks, the Roman cook, and his condiments. Only then, in Part Two of the book, 175 pages in, does Faas start presenting recipes for actual dishes.

I was captivated by so much of what I found in this book. I knew that Romans reclined to eat their dinners, but how exactly did they arrange themselves around the table, and who reclined next to whom? The answers are here, along with illustrations. Did Romans really gorge themselves and then vomit up their food to eat more? (Not often, according to Faas; after drinking, though—that’s another matter.) What kinds of dishes and utensils did they eat with? What kinds of pots and pans did they cook with? All here, and illustrated.

The recipes section is broken down interestingly into four parts named after the four elements, presenting dishes drawn from the land (cereal and vegetables), from the fire (cooked meat), from the air (birds), and from the water (fish). I’ve read some authors who claim that the typical Roman diet was monotonous and frugal, but the great wealth of ingredients, flavors, and techniques presented here seem to give that notion the lie. The Romans liked strongly flavored, highly seasoned foods. But they also liked fresh vegetables, and Roman gentlemen took pride in their skill at growing them—much like modern Italians that I’ve known in the Vancouver area! And Roman women did not cook. If a slave was not cooking, then the head of the household would attend to it himself; even emperors would practice cuisine and personally see to the feeding of their family and guests.

Faas does not simply give recipes; the various dishes offer opportunities to explain various facts, attitudes, and peculiarities in the Romans’ approach to food. The section on vegetable dishes starts with a discussion of the Roman garden, including its required statue of Priapus, the phallic god of gardens.

Each recipe is presented first as the original Latin text followed by its English translation, then a more detailed discussion intended to make the recipe doable for the modern cook. For hard-to-get ingredients he suggests good modern alternatives. The ubiquitous garum or fermented fish sauce, for example, can be replaced with soy sauce or anchovy paste. The equally ubiquitous herb lovage can be replaced with parsley or celery root.

It seems that Faas has made all these dishes himself, even the most exotic, such as roast flamingo or brain pate or sow’s udders. He notes when the food is likely to be less palatable for the modern diner, but also how often the Roman dish is very good as is.

I have not been bold enough myself to try making any of the dishes; that was not my aim in reading the book. But Faas’s enthusiasm and depth of knowledge have got me interested in trying some. For cuisine makes its own strong, definite statement about a culture, and this book gives a real flavor of ancient Rome.
Kirimath
Faas' combination of exploring Roman culture via food and dining ritual is fascinating in its own right. Once the recipes are added, Around the Roman Table becomes a fantastic way to participate in history rather than passively attempt to absorb it.

I would have liked more illustrations or possibly photos of how the recipes turned out with Faas' attempts at making them. Other than that, this was a fun and interesting book.
Haralem
Pretty awesome book... I must say. If you wanted to know about Roman cooking this is the book for you. It talks about all kinds of aspects of life and entertainment in Rome as well. Some ingredients don't translate well... Dolphin? Whats a good replacement for that? Good book though.
Sadaron above the Gods
An excellent introduction to the Ancient Roman culinary tradition. It begins with an introduction to Roman dining customs, and covers ingredients and beverages before moving on to recipes. An invaluable resource!
Around the Roman Table: Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome download epub
Humanities
Author: Shaun Whiteside,Patrick Faas
ISBN: 0226233472
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (April 1, 2005)
Pages: 384 pages