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The hungry woman : A Mexican Medea download epub

by Cherrie L. Moraga,Irma Mayorga


Epub Book: 1308 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1560 kb.

Irma Mayorga's critical afterword is essential, as the multilingual passages and multicultural allusions make these plays a challenge to read. Recommended for selected academic and public libraries. Ming-ming Shen Kuo, Ball State Univ.

Irma Mayorga's critical afterword is essential, as the multilingual passages and multicultural allusions make these plays a challenge to read. The play is poetic but blunt. With humor, Moraga vividly describes the defeat of Lords of Death and the underworld in a playful ball game and the making of humans with maize.

In The Hungry Woman, an apocalyptic play written at the end of the millennium, Moraga uses mythology and an intimate realism to. .

In The Hungry Woman, an apocalyptic play written at the end of the millennium, Moraga uses mythology and an intimate realism to describe the embattled position of Chicanos and Chicanas, not only in the United States but in relation to each other

The Hungry Woman book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Hungry Woman book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea & Heart of the Earth: A Popul Vuh Story as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Hungry Woman : A Mexican Medea and Heart of the Earth - A Popul Vuh Story. by Cherríe L. Moraga and Irma Mayorga. THE HUNGRY WOMAN contains two plays by internationally recognized playwright Cherrie L. Moraga: THE HUNGRY WOMAN: A MEXICAN MEDEA and HEART OF THE EARTH: A POPUL VUH STORY. Both plays express Moraga's deep connection to myth, to the cultural question of Aztlan, and to Chicano/a politics as further shaped by feminist understanding and queer identity.

Moraga 28-9) The association between these two parts of her identity-Chicana and queer-have formed the foundation for Moraga’s 2001 play, The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea. In it, Moraga uses the myths of Euripides’ Medea, the Mexican myths of the La Llorona and Coatlicue, and the Aztec myth of The Hungry Woman as a way to explode the relationship between the patriarchal pan-indigenous movement and the women, particularly queer women the movement has failed. Medea is a woman maddened by not only her broken relationships with Jasón and her lover Luna, but by the loss of Aztlán, Indian nation.

Most productions of Medea seem to clock in at around an hour and a half. It's telling that playwright Cherrie Moraga's inventively Chicano- and lesbian-themed-but longwinded and of the tragedy takes about two and a half hours. Not only does she relate the Greek tragedy about a woman who is driven to kill her children but she also blends into the mix issues of Hispanic heritage, feminist philosophy, and lesbian theory.

The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea & Heart of the Earth: A Popul Vuh Story. Moraga · Irma Mayorga. In "The Hungry Woman, " an apocalyptic play written at the end of the millennium, Moraga uses mythology and an intimate realism to describe the embattled position of Chicanos and Chicanas, not only in the United States but in relation to each other. Colonize This!: Young Women of Color on Today's Feminism. by Daisy Hernández · Bushra Rehman · Cherríe L. Moraga.

The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea is a play by Cherríe Moraga. The play, published by West End Press, was first written in 1995. It includes aspects of Coatlicue, an Aztec goddess; the play Medea by Euripides; and La Llorona

The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea is a play by Cherríe Moraga. It includes aspects of Coatlicue, an Aztec goddess; the play Medea by Euripides; and La Llorona. A revolution in what was the United States had created separate territories for different racial groups. One territory is now African-American, one territory is now Native American, and another is now Latino and Hispanic.

It traces similarities and differences between The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea,.

Medea served as a leader in the Chicano revolt. Time is linear on this planet, but the story is switches between present time and flashbacks of Medea leading up to her incarceration

Medea served as a leader in the Chicano revolt. She was exiled from Aztlán with her son after her husband found that she was sleeping with the masonry, which he hired. They live in Phoenix, Arizona. It’s a city in ruins. Time is linear on this planet, but the story is switches between present time and flashbacks of Medea leading up to her incarceration. The mood of the play shifts from cold to much darker and serious mood. 2 Social world of the play (Answers should be 200 words): The social of the world is very patriarchal. The men definitely have more power than women in this world.

In The Hungry Woman, an apocalyptic play written at the end of the millennium, Moraga uses mythology and an intimate realism to describe the embattled position of Chicanos and Chicanas, not only in the United States but in relation to each other. Drawing from the Greek Medea and the myth of La Llorona, she portrays a woman gone mad between her longing for another woman and for the Indian nation which is denied her.

In Heart of the Earth, a feminist revisioning of the Quichí­ Maya Popul Vuh story, Moraga creates an allegory for contemporary Chicanismo in which the enemy is white, patriarchal, and greedy for hearts, both female and fecund. Through humor and inventive tale twisting, Moraga brings her vatos locos home from the deadly underworld to reveal that the real power of creation is found in the masa Grandma is grinding up in her metate. The script, a collaboration with master puppet maker Ralph Lee, was created for the premiere production of the play at The Public Theater in New York in 1994.

In a Foreword to this edition, Moraga comments on her concerns about nationhood, indigenism, queer sexuality, and gender information.


Comments: (7)

krot
Had to read "Heart of the Earth" for class, but it is a beautiful weaving of Spanish, English, Spanglish, Chicano, and Quiche. It will make your vocabulary and linguistic skills expand while retelling the Maya creation story.
Der Bat
Only bought it for school purposes
Yalone
I'm not a fan of the story and plays!
Goldenfang
was required reading
Maveri
I did not read it, it was a gift. and they loved it.
SadLendy
It really is a wonderful play to read, especially with the mix of language: Spanish and English.
I loved it.
Modar
This is a rewriting and expansion of the myth of Medea in a "post-modern" and "post-colonial" situation in America, where the South has become Aztlan due to a Mexican revolution that pays lip service to the old Aztec gods with Jason having an important position there; where the white society up North has cleansed itself entirely of any ethnic penetration; and where an in-between bumper zone is the survival locale of those who fit pn neither side, like for instance Medea, and whose capital is Phoenix.

Medea has been exiled by Jason with her son Adolfo/Chac-Mool from Aztlan. She tries to go back to the Indian traditions of the Aztecs.

The music is Pre-Columbian. The chorus of four women represents Cihuatateo, four warrior women who have died in childbirth. They embody the four directions and four colors of Aztec tradition: East and red, North and black, West and white, South and blue. They play most parts except Medea, Luna, Chac Mool and Mama Sal. All characters are held by female actresses except Chac-Mool who is the only male on stage.

Medea is living the life of a lesbian with her lover Luna though she protests she is not a lesbian. She is a complicated woman, the mother of a son, only one - though she wanted a daughter to take care of her in old age and to spite her husband Jason already that long ago if not from the very start - and that son is getting of age - thirteen - to answer the call from his father to go back to Aztlan.

The fact that all characters but one are females shows an essential point in Medea's vision. She sees the world as purely feminine and woman as a pure mother, and a mother is only satisfied when she is the mother of a daughter. We are definitely inside Medea's total schizophrenia dressed up as an Aztec myth. The key is given by Cihuatateo East who tells us the creation myth, Aztec style.

" Creation myth. In the place where the spirits live, there was once a woman who cried constantly for food. She had mouths everywhere. In her wrists, elbows, ankles, knees. . . And every mouth was hungry y bien, gritona. Bueno, to comfort la pubre, the spirits flew down and began to make grass and flowers from the dirt brown of her skin. From her greñas, they made forests. From those ojos negros, pools and springs. And from the slopes of her shoulders and senos, they made mountains y valles. At last she will be satisfied, they thought. Pero just like before, her mouths were everywhere, biting and moaning. . . opening and snapping shut. They would never be filled. Sometimes por la noche, when the wind blows, you can hear her crying for food."

The whole world was thus created from a hungry woman who was dismantled by the spirits, each part of her body becoming one element in the landscape and her mouth which was everywhere in her body found itself everywhere in the world.

Note the spirits being hostile to that woman - though you can always say they tried to satisfy her - you may understand these spirits were males, though there is no real indication of the fact and the only goddess mentioned in the play is Coatlicue, the goddess represented by the moon, the full moon. She is the goddess of all mothers who died in childbirth. We find that Medea's lesbian lover, Luna, is only the representation of this goddess.

Medea's problem is that she is a woman only in her motherhood. So she cannot accept her son departing to join his father in Aztlan where Jason is to marry a teenage local Apache girl who is barren. She gives him a territory but he needs his son to have a descent.

Medea cannot refuse that departure but she can help her son on his departing night to have some good sleep. She puts him to sleep forever just not to be reduced to nothing by being deprived of her son and consequently of her motherhood.

The lesbian debate is a false debate since Luna is the goddess Coatlicue and lesbianism makes Luna barren to motherhood, hence dependent on Medea's love.

She accuses Coatlicue of treason then and she starts ranting and raving after her crime about how the male god of war who is the son of her mother Coatlicue and thus her brother beheaded her when she was still a child.

This story is a way to explain her devotion to la Luna, her real goddess, and Medea closes the tale by killing herself in a dream of her own where she is served the poison by Chac-Mool who is dead as we know. And Medea's formula is absolutely frightening when she serves the poison to Chac Mool: "Sleep the innocent sleep of the children."

She dies when giving birth to herself and to do that she had to kill her son who then could kill her in the psychiatric hospital where she had been institutionalized, a metaphor of her total escape from the human world. Hence her son coming as a ghost to deliver the poison to her is the symbolical suicide her own crime is necessarily going to bring to her. She will not be negated in her motherhood but she will be negated in her own life.

This becomes a whole metaphor of Chicana women who are nothing outside motherhood, who are goddesses when dying in childbirth, who have to deny men to remain mothers, hence to turn to lesbianism and eventually kill their own sons to save their schizophrenic vision, because these women are schizophrenic.

If there is any future to Chicano culture, to the resurrection of Aztec culture, it will have to come through a vast slaying of fathers and sons in the name of mothers.

That cleansing can come with sleep and not by shedding blood, but men will have to be transmiuted, but that is a vicious circle because then the sons thus transmuted will put their mothers to sleep the same way. The only solution is the end of humanity. If that is not schizophrenic what is?

And the hungry woman will forever reign in the world. If that is not a Post Genocide Traumatic Stress Syndrome what is?

Dr Jacques COULARDEAU
The hungry woman : A Mexican Medea download epub
Humanities
Author: Cherrie L. Moraga,Irma Mayorga
ISBN: 097053440X
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: West End Press; 11/15/01 edition (December 31, 2001)
Pages: 176 pages