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Slow Fade to Black: Negro in American Film, 1900-42 download epub

by Thomas Cripps


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Slow Fade to Black book.

Negro in the American film industry from its beginnings to the 1942 agreements between the NAACP and Hollywood studio heads codifying social gains that had already been won by blacks in the larger society.

In the words of its author, a historian, this is a ""social history"" that traces the role of the Negro in the American film industry from its beginnings to the 1942 agreements between the NAACP and Hollywood studio heads codifying social gains that had already been won by blacks in the larger society. Much of the story is concerned with the difficulties encountered by black actors and actresses who were looking for roles that transcended degrading stereotypes and ""jungle bunny"" extras

History & Criticism Film Books.

History & Criticism Film Books. Slow Fade to Black : The Negro in American Film, 1900-1942. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect.

Thomas Cripps is Professor of History at Morgan State University. He is also the author of Making Movies Black (Oxford, 1993). Библиографические данные.

Thomas Cripps Previous: Film nation: Hollywood looks at . Library availability.

1993 Previous: Film nation: Hollywood looks at .

Hence, the earliest depiction of blacks in American films did not concern itself with accuracy nor did it consult the black community for precision. Slow Fade to Black: The Negro in American Film, 1900–1942. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993. In 1903, Uncle Tom’s Cabin introduced the first black character to motion pictures in America. Tom, who was portrayed by a white actor in blackface, launched the long line of socially acceptable Good Negro characters. 2 The tom was kind toward his oppressor and content with his condition of enslavement.

Thomas Cripps,Slow Fade to Black: The Negro in American Films, 1900–1942 (London: Oxford University Press .

Thomas Cripps,Slow Fade to Black: The Negro in American Films, 1900–1942 (London: Oxford University Press, 1977), p. 2. oogle Scholar. ci. p. 11. For powerful discussions of this and related themes as they have pervaded American racism, see four books by Calvin C. Hernton,Sex and Racism in America (Garden City: Doubleday and Company, 1965), esp. pp. 55–86;White Papers for White Americans (Garden City: Doubleday and Company, 1966);Coming Together: Black Power, White Hatred, and Sexual Hang-Ups (New York

Cripps, Thomas, Slow Fade to Black: The Negro in American Film, 1900–1942, Oxford University Press, 1993. The Girl from Chicago (1932).

Cripps, Thomas, Slow Fade to Black: The Negro in American Film, 1900–1942, Oxford University Press, 1993. "Oscar Micheaux Biography" Archived 2008-10-20 at the Wayback Machine, Producers Guild of America. The Notorious Elinor Lee in the Internet Movie Database. Ten Minutes to Kill (1933).

Set against the backdrop of the black struggle in society, Slow Fade to Black is the definitive history of African-American accomplishment in film--both before and behind the camera--from the earliest movies through World War II. As he records the changing attitudes toward African-Americans both in Hollywood and the nation at large, Cripps explores the growth of discrimination as filmmakers became more and more intrigued with myths of the Old South: the "lost cause" aspect of the Civil War, the stately mansions and gracious ladies of the antebellum South, the "happy" slaves singing in the fields. Cripps shows how these characterizations culminated in the blatantly racist attitudes of Griffith's The Birth of a Nation, and how this film inspired the N.A.A.C.P. to campaign vigorously--and successfully--for change. While the period of the 1920s to 1940s was one replete with Hollywood stereotypes (blacks most often appeared as domestics or "natives," or were portrayed in shiftless, cowardly "Stepin Fetchit" roles), there was also an attempt at independent black production--on the whole unsuccessful. But with the coming of World War II, increasing pressures for a wider use of blacks in films, and calls for more equitable treatment, African-Americans did begin to receive more sympathetic roles, such as that of Sam, the piano player in the 1942 classic Casablanca. A lively, thorough history of African-Americans in the movies, Slow Fade to Black is also a perceptive social commentary on evolving racial attitudes in this country during the first four decades of the twentieth century.

Comments: (2)

Amerikan_Volga
In its own way, a wondrous and thrilling history of achievement against a wall of impositions and limitations.
Faegal
Everything arrived in perfect order
Slow Fade to Black: Negro in American Film, 1900-42 download epub
Humanities
Author: Thomas Cripps
ISBN: 0195018648
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1st Edition edition (April 7, 1977)
Pages: 462 pages