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Ponder These Things: Praying with Icons of the Virgin download epub

by Rowan Williams


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I selected this book by Rowan Williams because I wished to learn more about his views and Icons.

I selected this book by Rowan Williams because I wished to learn more about his views and Icons. The book is an uplifting read and provided the info I was interested in. I enjoyed the content. As the scriptural text talks about Mary & these things in heart', so to are we called, when praying with the icons, to exhibit that kind of faith and loving nature, sureness of God's call and direction to us, whatever it may bring. The modern piece is not what one would consider an icon in the regular sense.

Ponder These Things book. As usual with Rowan it is well written and enlightening

Ponder These Things book. As usual with Rowan it is well written and enlightening. it is more his personal take on the icons than an historical or traditional aspect. It is worth reading more than once. Nov 23, 2018 Caleb rated it it was amazing. Apr 15, 2016 Basil rated it it was amazing. Theological devotion at its best.

This classic invites you to explore the depths of meaning in three classic icons of the Virgin Mary and her Child from the Eastern Christian tradition

This classic invites you to explore the depths of meaning in three classic icons of the Virgin Mary and her Child from the Eastern Christian tradition. Rowan Williams discovers the pattern of love that they reveal, a love that invites and embraces us so that we no longer remain as spectators, but find ourselves caught up in the drama that unfolds itself before us. " A book to be read not once only, but many times.

A close look at three classic icons of the Virgin and Child reveals profound truths about discovering God in our World. You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

Williams invites readers to explore and reflect on the depths of meaning in three classic icons of the Virgin and . Praying with Icons of the Virtue.

Williams invites readers to explore and reflect on the depths of meaning in three classic icons of the Virgin and her Child from the Eastern Christian tradition. Williams explores the true depths of meaning of three classic icons of Mary: the Hodegetria, the Eleousa and the Orans. Finally he makes contemporary sense of one of the many legends of Mary to show how all Christians can model themselves on her. Specifications.

Rowan Williams, the Archbishop of Canterbury, is acclaimed by many as the world's leading theologian. His Canterbury and SCM books have sold 75,000 copies.

Author: Rowan Williams,Kallistos Ware,Leigh Hurlock ISBN 10: 185311362X. Used-like N : The book pretty much look like a new book. Read full description. See details and exclusions. He also makes contemporary sense of one of the many legends of Mary to show how all Christians can model themselves on her. Product Identifiers.

Icons, says Archbishop Rowan, show us the wa. .Ideal for all Christians-Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant-Ponder These Things invites you to explore and reflect on the depths of meaning in three classic icons from the Eastern Christian tradition

Icons, says Archbishop Rowan, show us the wa.And that is exactly what I experienced as I rea.This is a book to be read not once only, but many times. Kallistos Ware, from the Foreword. Ideal for all Christians-Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant-Ponder These Things invites you to explore and reflect on the depths of meaning in three classic icons from the Eastern Christian tradition. Icons have been described as theology in line and color. Tracing the movement within them, the Archbishop of Canterbury discovers the pattern of love that they reveal.

Williams, Rowan, 2002 Ponder these things: praying with icons of the Virgin. "Lauds in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary, before the ancient icon of Our Lady, Mother of God of Kazan". ISBN 1-85311-362-X p. 7. ^ Schultz, Thomas. Retrieved 16 December 2014. a b Schmemann, Alexander.

Ponder these things Williams, Rowan Неизвестно 9781853113628 : Here, Williams explores the true depths of meaning of three classic icons of Mary: the Hodegetria, the Eleousa and the Orans.

This beautifully illustrated book invites modern-day pilgrims and people of prayer to think about some of the different ways in which Mary is regularly portrayed in the art of Eastern Christianity. Specifically, it explores three of the most common yet theologically rich images of the Holy Virgin—She Who Points the Way or Hodegetria, The Virgin of Loving Kindness or Eleousa, and The Virgin of the Sign or Oranta—all of which serve as a wonderful springboard for theological and personal reflection.

Comments: (7)

Funny duck
Wonderful text. Rowan Williams shows deep insight into the beauty and the mystery of the icons, dispelling some of their strangeness in an intimate and accessible little text. Highly recommended.
Saintrius
Beautiful book! Gorgeous to look at, very moving inspiring text and quick to read and re-read.
Hono
This book contains beautiful pictures. The text explains the icons in a sacred yet easy to understand manner. I have returned to reread the book many times.
Vathennece
I selected this book by Rowan Williams because I wished to learn more about his views and Icons. The book is an uplifting read and provided the info I was interested in. I enjoyed the content.
Na
Rowan Williams, the Archbishop of Canterbury, has written a series of meditations on three icons, specifically on three forms of icons of the Blessed Virgin Mary with the Christ Child. The first is the Hodegetria, Mary who shows us the way. Mary and Christ in this icon manifest their unique identities in a relationship: she is one who engages us in order to point us to Christ the way that leads to life, he is one who looks with love on humanity. The second icon is the Eleousa, the tender loving Madonna, named for the obvious affection of the Virgin for her child. But Rowan focuses here more on the love with which the God-man embraces his mother and through her the whole human race, passionately leaping over the boundaries that would seem to separate humanity from divinity. The third icon is the Orans, where Mary is the sign of the Church at prayer containing within herself/itself the God-man as the source of that prayer, remarkable in his hiddenness in the Church, in society, and in our own lives. The archbishop concludes with a reflection on the legend of Mary being raised in the temple and working on the sanctuary veil. The veil is the symbol of that which separates God and humanity, a symbol rent in two at the death of Christ. These few words, however, only point in the general direction of Rowan's deeper reflections, and the book deserves rereading and further meditation. Bishop Kallistos Ware writes an appreciative introduction. Protestant, Orthodox and Catholic alike may benefit from and appreciate this work.
Alsardin
`Ponder These Things: Praying with Icons of the Virgin' is the latest book by Rowan Williams, recently appointment to be Archbishop of Canterbury after a distinguished career as an academic and cleric in the Church of England (Anglican Church). Williams has a great affinity for the wider breadth of Christian experience, drawing influences and inspiration from Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox practices across the centuries. In this book, which is introduced by Bishop Kalistos Ware, a prominent Orthodox theologian, Williams explores ways in which meditation and prayer can be strengthened and enhanced with incorporation of iconographic images.
Protestants particularly have lost the tradition of the use of art work as representative objects for worship. However, the debate over the appropriateness of icons and other imagery is almost as old as Christianity itself. That Jesus could be depicted without violation of the `no graven images' commandment took a long time to be decided, and finally was deemed permissible because of Jesus' human nature. Rare the depiction of God or God the Father as anything more than a cloud, a hand, or some other vague symbol meant to characterise, more than anything else, the mystery involved rather than an actual physical likeness. Michaelangelo's depictions on the Sistine Chapel ceiling are remarkable not simply from their aesthetic quality, but also in that the image of God is very direct and distinctly human in form.
However, icons are a special form of art. They are not simple paintings, however elegant, as Ware points out in his introduction.
`The icon is not simply a work of art on the same level as any other work of art. On the contrary, the icon exists within a specific context; and, if divorced from that context, it ceases to be truly itself. The icon is part of an act of worship; its context is invocation and doxology. The art of the icon is a liturgical art. In the tradition of the Orthodox church, the icon is not merely a piece of decoration or a visual aid. We do more than just look at icons or talk about them; we pray with them.'
Williams draws his work from an event in his own ministry back in Britain.
`These meditations are really about how we are led by faith both to live in the world, fully flesh and blood in it, and at the same time to be aware of the utter strangeness of God that waits in the heart of what is familiar - as if the world were always on the edge of some total revolution, pregnant with a different kind of life, and we were always trying to catch the blinding momentary light of its changing.'
Using three traditional icons and one modern piece, Williams draws us into a method of contemplation and consideration with the icons. The Hodegetria, the Eleousa, and the Orans traditional icons show depictions of the Virgin Mary in very traditional ways; one who is faithful, who is loving, who is sign and a direction of the way we are to go. Traditionally the Virgin Mary is the first human being to have faith in Jesus, faith in his mission and faith in God's direction of that purpose. The Magnificat is a verbal depiction of this kind of faith; icons are the visual depiction. As the scriptural text talks about Mary `pondering these things in heart', so to are we called, when praying with the icons, to exhibit that kind of faith and loving nature, sureness of God's call and direction to us, whatever it may bring.
The modern piece is not what one would consider an icon in the regular sense. Using a modern art scarlet and purple fabric study by Leigh Hurlock, Williams explores a legend of Mary, the story of her weaving the sanctuary veil, a curtain that separated the Holy of Holies from the eyes and physical presence of those who came into the Temple. In a sense, Mary's being provided the substance to weave both the veil and the way to see past the veil to holiness through Jesus.
Purple is the colour of royalty; scarlet is the colour of martyrdom, or the cross. The colours are significant, as are the images, in making the completeness of the experience as an iconographic piece.
This is a small book. It has a mere 75 pages or so of text, and thus could be read fairly quickly. However, to do so would be to deny oneself the richness of the experience. One can glance at an icon, generally a fairly small object, and think one has seen it. However, the true experience of an icon, and the true experience of this book, comes from re-reading, stopping, meditating, and slowly working through each detail. The book is generously illustrated in word and graphic art. Each of the icons is presented in full colour, with details highlighted in larger size at appropriate points in the text.
Through all the meditations, we are looking for God, and hopefully come to realise that God also looks for us.
`We find the God who has taken up residence in the heart of our humanity, who prays when we are not looking, not trying, who is at work when we are silent or helpless, and who can never be pinned down to a here or there in our individual lives or in the Church at large.'
Ponder these things...
Pryl
Pretenders
Ponder These Things: Praying with Icons of the Virgin download epub
Humanities
Author: Rowan Williams
ISBN: 1580511244
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Sheed & Ward (November 1, 2002)
Pages: 96 pages