» » Virgil: Georgics: Volume 1, Books I-II (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics)

Virgil: Georgics: Volume 1, Books I-II (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics) download epub

by Virgil


Epub Book: 1678 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1556 kb.

Volume 40, Issue 2. October 1990, pp. 260-263. The Georgics - Richard F. Thomas: Virgil, Georgics, Vol. 1: Books I–II; Vol. 2: Books III–IV. Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics. Cambridge University Press, 1988. I £25 (Paper, £. 5), II £25 (Paper, £. 5). R. G. M. Nisbet (a1).

Professor Thomas describes the Georgics as 'perhaps the most difficult, certainly the most controversial, poem in Roman literature'.

The Georgics suffer a bit in my mind from Virgil's program, of writing a semi-practical almanac of raising crops and livestock

The Georgics suffer a bit in my mind from Virgil's program, of writing a semi-practical almanac of raising crops and livestock. But it's a vision of men at work, learning to read the signs of nature but also dealing with nature's enmity and dangers. This insistence on the drudgery and repetition of husbandry, the skills required and the fairly terrifying descriptions of adders lurking in the horsestalls and the onset of a plague of anthrax mean that Virgil's farmers and shepherds are not frolicking poetic cutouts.

BEGINNER’S LATIN BOOK WILLIAM C. COLLAR AND M. GRANT DANIELL This public domain grammar The Beginn.

56 MB·1,392 Downloads·New!. 86 MB·1,010 Downloads·New!. BEGINNER’S LATIN BOOK WILLIAM C. Page 1 a 2 Audio CAMBRIDGE ' CDS Cambridge Books for. 173 Pages·2011·3. 92 MB·15,541 Downloads.

The Introduction also covers stylistic, metrical and structural questions. A subject index and indexes of important Greek and Latin words conclude each volume. The Introduction contains material for non-classicists interested in Latin literature.

Start by marking Georgics: Vol 1, Books I-II (Greek and Latin Classics) as Want to Read .

Start by marking Georgics: Vol 1, Books I-II (Greek and Latin Classics) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Virgil: Georgics: Volume 1, Книги 1-2 Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics Georgics, Virgil. Virgil: Georgics: Volume 1, Книги 1-2 Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics Georgics, Virgil.

These two volumes provide a commentary, with text, on Virgil's Georgics, a poem in four books probably written between 35 and 29 BC. The introduction, in Volume 1, treats the poem's historical background and its relationship to the early years of Augustan Rome, Virgil's use of prior literary material, his stylistic and metrical expertise, and questions of poetic structure. There is also a section interpreting the poem in light of recent scholarship, which seeks to consider the poem as part of the broad unity of Virgil's career, rather than from a narrow didactic approach. A new Latin text of the poem is followed by extensive line-by-line commentary, explaining difficult passages, interpreting poetic intent, and tracing the influence of Virgil's Greek and Roman antecedents. A subject index and indexes of important Greek and Latin words conclude each volume.

Comments: (7)

Framokay
The Georgics are not to everyone's taste, but it is an exquisite poem in many ways, and vastly influential. This is an excellent translation (Johnson). It is very close to the Latin, in fact it is sometimes so close as to make some lines temporarily puzzling -- and some of the word choices are very obscure English -- but it does give a feel for how much is actually being done in the very tight, mosaic-like Latin. A similar translation (also with facing page Latin) is David Ferry's well-known version, which is looser, but probably easier to read for the first time reader. Older, good translations are by the eminent Georgic scholar, Wilkinson (in an earlier Penguin edition with the most erudite introductions), and C.D.Lewis' earlier famous translation. The Oxford World Classics translation by Peter Fallon is just weird. For farmers, the line-by-line Mynors commentary on everything from soil types to astronomical signs is the bees' knees (for bees, check out book IV).
superstar
This is not a very good translation. The notes are fairly elementary and the vocabulary and syntax of the verse is obscure and confusing. Much better is L. P. Wilkinson's translation in an earlier Penguin edition. One nice thing about the present edition is the presence of the Latin original on the opposite page.
Alsantrius
great! one can't have too many translations of the georgics
Gholbithris
No comment
Eayaroler
The reviews are from Mynor's commentary, which is not the Wilkinson Penguin.

The Georgics is a deep work, all the more powerful in these days of environmental concern. Part of its merit is its meditation on what is and is not controllable in the human relationship with the land. It is hard to believe that someone could write so beautifully about soil and pigs and vines, but Virgil accomplishes this and much more. It has for two thousand years been one of the touchstones of western civilization, so might be worth a little of your time! The best parts are in book 4 -- the allegorical story of beekeeping, which (among other descendants) finds a later echo in Book 1 of Paradise Lost -- and the exquisite story of Orpheus and Eurydice, itself embedded in the story of Aristeus and Proteus.

Wilkinson is one of the deans of Virgilian scholarship, and it shows here in his introduction (there could have been more notes -- for notes, head for Mynor), and the translation is accurate and in places quite beautiful in its own right. Of the other translations available, Lewis is an old favourite, but I am now fond of David Ferry's version. David Ross' book on the Physics and Poetry of the Georgics is worth having as a resource to hand.
Nilasida
This is an extraordinarily beautiful edition of the poet's work translated by Dryden and published by the Heritage Press in 1953. The publisher shrewdly chose an Italian,Bruno Bramanti,to furnish illustrations that are grave and lovely.I prefer this translation by Dryden for its' structure,but there is an American-flavored rendering by Janet Lembke that is sensitive, and modern in the best sense of the word.That said,I find Dryden's trumpet of rhyme irresistible:
What makes a plenteous harvest,when to turn
The fruitful soil,and when to sow the corn;
The care of sheep,of oxen and of kine,
And how to raise on elms the teeming vine;
The birth and genius of the frugal bee,
I sing,Maecenas,and I sing to thee.

The translation is majestic,stirring and timeless.It is a fair tribute to Tennyson's description of "Roman Virgil" as "the lord of language".You will seldom own a more beautiful book.
Mr_Jeйson
The Kindle edition linked to this is NOT Mynors' commentary, obviously. Nor is the supposed hardback link, which is a rip-off press of J. B. Greenough 1900. "What makes the cornfield smile," etc. Beware.
The warm and friendly poet from Mantua, Publius Virgilius Maro, in his didactic poem entitled the "Georgics," covers topics relating to farming: in book one he deals with crops, in book two trees and shrubs, in book three livestock, and in book four bees. While several scholars have regarded this work as one of the best Latin poems ever, it must be taken into account that it is, nevertheless, far less entertaining than his famous "Aenied," and much more difficult to read. At times, in the "Georgics," Virgil echoes with that same brilliance many people have come to love in the "Aenied." But for the most part, this poem may be rigorous for anyone not serious about Roman poetry, so it is not recommended for everyone. In context of Virgil's time, this poem easily gets five stars, but the many archaisms found in it tend to alienate modern readers, and so, with much hesitation, the poem receives only three.
Virgil: Georgics: Volume 1, Books I-II (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics) download epub
Humanities
Author: Virgil
ISBN: 0521278503
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (July 29, 1988)
Pages: 288 pages