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by Barker,Juliet R V Barker


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In this book, Juliet Barker provides a feast of information about the lives, times and writings of the Brontes. She is not the first to traverse this territory, but I believe that she does it more comprehensively than anyone else.

In this book, Juliet Barker provides a feast of information about the lives, times and writings of the Brontes. The book itself is both a delight to read as well as a wonderful reference.

Juliet R. V. Barker FRSL (born 1958) is an English historian, specialising in the Middle Ages and literary biography. She is the author of a number of well-regarded works on the Brontës, William Wordsworth, and medieval tournaments. From 1983 to 1989 she was the curator and librarian of the Bronte Parsonage Museum. Barker was educated at Bradford Girls' Grammar School and St Anne's College, Oxford, where she gained her doctorate in medieval history.

Juliet Barker's landmark book was the first definitive history of the Brontes. It demolishes myths, yet provides startling new information that is just as compelling - but true

Juliet Barker's landmark book was the first definitive history of the Brontes. It demolishes myths, yet provides startling new information that is just as compelling - but true. THE BRONTES is a revolutionary picture of the world's favourite literary family. As a work of scholarship it is briliant.

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Juliet Barker's landmark book is the first definitive history of the Brontës. It demolishes the myths, yet provides startling new information that is just as compelling-but true.

Juliet Barker is an internationally recognised expert on the Brontës and medieval chivalry. She was born in Yorkshire and has lived within a few miles of Haworth all her life

Juliet Barker is an internationally recognised expert on the Brontës and medieval chivalry. She was born in Yorkshire and has lived within a few miles of Haworth all her life. Educated at Bradford Girls’ Grammar School and St Anne’s College, Oxford, where she gained a doctorate in medieval history, she was curator and librarian of the Brontë Parsonage Museum at Haworth from 1983 to 1989. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

item 2 The Brontes by Barker, Juliet . Juliet Barker has a . hil in history from Oxford University, and was for six years librarian/curator of the Bronte Parsonage Museum at Haworth. Hardback Book The Cheap Fast Free Post -The Brontes by Barker, Juliet . Hardback Book The Cheap Fast Free Post. Last oneFree postage. Country of Publication.

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About Juliet Barker: Juliet R. Barker (born 1958) is a British historian, specialising in the Middle Ages and literary biography. Barker was educated at Bradford Girls' Grammar School and St Anne's College, Oxford, where she gained her doctorate in medieval history

About Juliet Barker: Juliet R. In 1999 she was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Letters by the University of Bradford. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. Juliet Barker’s books.

The story of the tragic Bronte family is familiar to everyone: we all know about the half-mad, repressive father, the drunken, drug-addicted wastrel of a brother, wild romantic Emily, unrequited Anne and 'poor Charlotte'. Or do we? These stereotypes of the popular imagination are precisely that - imaginary - created by amateur biographers from Mrs Gaskell onwards who were primarily novelists, and were attracted by the tale of an apparently doomed family of genius. Juliet Barker's landmark book was the first definitive history of the Brontes. It demolishes myths, yet provides startling new information that is just as compelling - but true. Based on first-hand research among all the Bronte manuscripts, many so tiny they can only be read by magnifying glass, and among contemporary historical documents never before used by Bronte biographers, this book is both scholarly and compulsively readable. THE BRONTES is a revolutionary picture of the world's favourite literary family. 'As a work of scholarship it is briliant ...For those with a passion for the Brontes, or for Victoriana, or for sheer wealth of historical minutiae, it is a stupendous read' INDPENDENT ON SUNDAY

Comments: (7)

Ironrunner
I highly recommend this book
Llbery
I was overwhelmed by the size of the book (thick) and the print (very small). This "was" our book club selection until we received the actual book. We may save it for another time; maybe a blizzard.
Qumen
Regardless of one's opinions about Juliet Barker's impression of Charlotte, and the rest of the Brontes, one can argue neither with the credibility of the author nor with her incredible research. The author has lived within a few miles of Haworth her entire life; was librarian and curator at the Bronte Parsonage Museum for six years; and researched this book for 11 years before publishing. The biography is 830 pages long, with an additional 150 pages of notes, and 30 pages of index. I would recommend this to those who are already well acquainted with the Brontes. It won't change your own personal myth of the Brontes, but it will shed light on trivia that might help explain background, names, and places in the various Bronte novels. For example, Charlotte's pseudonym, Currer Bell, now makes sense, though I disagree with Juliet's suggestion. This is much more than a biography; Juliet Barker includes the politics of the time, origins of modern Christian religious offshoots, the labor movement (the Luddites), and even the architecture (for example, the Late Perpendicular movement). Barker's description of the English landscape is wonderful, if a bit stilted. (When one is as emotionally linked with Yorkshire as I am, it's hard not be judgmental on descriptions of that wonderful place.) This book was meant to be read by the fire, on a cold and dark winter night, preferably in Haworth, with a soul mate who appreciates Yorkshire and all it has to offer.
Visonima
No one will write a more complete biography of the Brontës and one cannot say they have read about the family if they haven't read Ms. Barker's book. Just her copious reading of source material alone is mind boggling, as well as enlightening . Even those who know the history of the Brontës will find plenty surprises all along the way.

It is said the book spends a great deal on Patrick Brontë. However until this landmark publication, the Rev. Brontë was much maligned by Mrs. Gaskell's cartoon of him in her biography of his daughter, Charlotte. For 150 years other writers followed her lead, seemingly fearful to question , much less go angist the myth created using village gossip printed with out much altercation.

Gaskell's own experience with Patrick should have lead her to at least question these stories. In a private letter she calls Rve. Brontë, "a real brick". Indeed, she should. He was unfailing good to her and always jumped to her defence even after the book came out! But Mrs. G didn't much care for Charlotte's father and her book needed a villain to explain what, in her mind, was Charlotte's " morbidness". The good Rve would do nicely. His feelings didn't enter into it.

Mrs Gaskell's erroneous portait had reached a scripture like status and needed a scholarly reconsideration and rebuttal. Barker provides it and has done a great service imo

It's said it's dry? I don't see it. It's a page turner for me. I've read about the Brontës for 40 years and this book constantly expands my horizon and knowledge.... one small example , who else can tell you why Joe Taylor's daughter was nicknamed" Tim " and what it meant ? It's a minor detail , but it adds to the story. In her later years, CB saw much of Tim and her parents. Tim called Charlotte " grandma" and CB took up the nickname. It's great to know what one can about Tim Taylor.

It's said it's over critical of Charlotte. Well something about the diminutive author of "Jane Eyre" does seem to rub Barker the wrong way a bit. But you know Charlotte Brontë can take anything Ms. Barker can dish out and still come up trumps. She's tough. I actually came to admire CB even more

I do have to say I wonder at Barker's wonderment that the sisters excluded their ne'er do well and by this time, drunkard brother , Branwell, from thier poem publication efforts.

Emily insisted it was to be a secret. Even when sober Branwell did not have a reticent bone in his body. Barker calls his exclusion petty and mean. I say I'm glad something so important to the sisters was not sacrificed on their brother's alter and there for trashed into yet another pointless rehab for Branwell. It may have well have been in large measure why their efforts were secret in the first place...to keep it safe from such a fate.

I often think Anne was forced to or came up with the idea herself of "helping" Branwell by including him in her success at Thorpe Green, which of course ended in disaster. I see Branwell's exclusion from thier publishing as a healthy act by the sisters.

I do like Ms. Barker's appreciation of Charlotte's husband, Arthur Bell Nicholls, another much maligned figure in the Brontë story. It's incalculable what the Brontë enthusiast owes this gentleman who turned his Irish home into the first Brontë musume for the first 50 years after Charlotte's death.

We have boat loads of Brontë objects, art work, manuscripts, even Maria Brontës letters to Patrick, today and for all time thanks to Mr. N's care.

Mr. Nicholls referred to Charlotte's writing as "her genius" . He was very proud of her gift and it was a lie to say he discounted the writer. But indeed his focus was Chalotte Brontë Nicholls, the woman. I would hope it would be for a husband!
Kefym
Barker's book is a celebration of minutia. She has presented us with a vast amount of it (which will be of use to someone, I'm sure) but doesn't provide a insightful interpretation into what it all means. (I realize that much of this is up to the "dear reader"; however, direction often helps when trying to interpret a life) The scathing criticism of the Bronte Society in her introduction forshadows the rather "school-marmish" tone she adopts within the text. I found it condesending and unecessary - anybody reading the book is going to know Bronte Basics, so no need for lecturing! The title suggests that the book will consider all of the Brontes, but unfortunately, it is an uneven study. The book comes dangerously close to becoming just another Charlotte Bronte bio. I closed the book knowing little more about Emily or Anne, and far too much about Patrick. Still, I'm sure it will be a valuable research tool for Bronte scholars who wish to explore how Patrick's cravat influenced the Bronte's work, and similar stuff.
Whitebeard
I first read this book in 1995. I only recently bought my own copy.

In this book, Juliet Barker provides a feast of information about the lives, times and writings of the Brontes. She is not the first to traverse this territory, but I believe that she does it more comprehensively than anyone else. The book itself is both a delight to read as well as a wonderful reference.

My only (slight) quibble is the greater focus on Charlotte. Perhaps this is inevitable: Charlotte did outlive her siblings, and published more novels.

I am biased. I have been a fan of the Brontes (especially Emily and Anne) for over 40 years.

Highly recommended to all Bronte fans.

Jennifer Cameron-Smith

Please note: this review was first published on July 28 2006
The Bronts download epub
Author: Barker,Juliet R V Barker
ISBN: 0349122423
Category: Other
Language: English
Publisher: Abacus Software; 2nd Revised ed. edition (November 1, 2010)
Pages: 1158 pages