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Doctoring the Mind: Is Our Current Treatment of Mental Illness Really Any Good? download epub

by Richard P. Bentall


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Home Browse Books Book details, Doctoring the Mind: Is Our Current Treatment o. .Doctoring the Mind: Is Our Current Treatment of Mental Illness Really Any Good? By Richard P. Bentall. Toward the end of the twentieth century, the solution to mental illness seemed to be found. It lay in biological solutions, focusing on mental illness as a problem of the brain, to be managed or improved through drugs. We entered the "Prozac Age" and believed we had moved far beyond the time of frontal lobotomies to an age of good and successful mental healthcare. Biological psychiatry had triumphed. Except maybe it hadn't.

Scientific American Mind Magazine

Scientific American Mind Magazine. Psychoanalysis was popularly called the talking cure, but a better name is the listening one, because to be listened to properly inspires, or can inspire, hope. As Bentall starkly says: ‘Without hope, the struggle for survival seems pointless.

Doctoring the Mind: Why psychiatric treatments fail is a 2009 book by Richard Bentall, his thesis is critical of contemporary Western psychiatry. According to Bentall, it seems there is no "evidence that psychiatry has made a positive impact on human welfare" and "patients are doing no better today than they did a hundred years ago".

Doctoring the Mind book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Toward the end of the twentieth century, the solution to mental.

Richard Bentall, FBA (born 30 September 1956) is a Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Sheffield in the U. Doctoring the mind: is our current treatment of mental illness really any good?. ISBN 978-0-8147-9148-6.

Richard Bentall, FBA (born 30 September 1956) is a Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Sheffield in the UK. Contents. The UK title is Doctoring the Mind: Why Psychiatric Treatments Fail). Bentall, Richard (July 2014).

Doctoring the Mind Is Our Current Treatment of Mental Illness Really Any Good? by Richard P. Bentall and Publisher NYU Press. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780814787236, 0814787231. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780814791486, 0814791484. You are currently visiting our US store. You may visit any one of our stores by selecting a country below. Note that the availability of products for purchase is based on the country of your billing address. Some items may have regional restrictions for purchase.

Richard P. Bentall picks apart the science that underlies our current psychiatric practice. He puts the patient back at the heart of treatment for mental illness, making the case that a good relationship between patients and their doctors is the most important indicator of whether someone will recover. Arguing passionately for a future of mental health treatment that focuses as much on patients as individuals as on the brain itself, this is a book set to. redefine our understanding of the treatment of madness in the twenty-first century. eISBN: 978-0-8147-3914-3. Subjects: Psychology.

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Bentall, Richard P. Bibliographic Citation. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press, 2009. Mental Health Courts as a Way to Provide Treatment to Violent Persons With Severe Mental Illness . Lamb, H. Richard; Weinberger, Linda E. (2008-08-13). Related Items in Google Scholar.

of frontal lobotomies to an age of good and successful mental healthcare. More by Richard P. Madness Explained: Psychosis and Human Nature.

Doctoring the Mind : Is Our Current Treatment of Mental Illness Really Any Good? by Richard P.

Toward the end of the twentieth century, the solution to mental illness seemed to be found. It lay in biological solutions, focusing on mental illness as a problem of the brain, to be managed or improved through drugs. We entered the "Prozac Age" and believed we had moved far beyond the time of frontal lobotomies to an age of good and successful mental healthcare. Biological psychiatry had triumphed.

Except maybe it hadn’t. Starting with surprising evidence from the World Health Organization that suggests that people recover better from mental illness in a developing country than in the first world, Doctoring the Mind asks the question: how good are our mental healthcare services, really? Richard P. Bentall picks apart the science that underlies our current psychiatric practice. He puts the patient back at the heart of treatment for mental illness, making the case that a good relationship between patients and their doctors is the most important indicator of whether someone will recover.

Arguing passionately for a future of mental health treatment that focuses as much on patients as individuals as on the brain itself, this is a book set to redefine our understanding of the treatment of madness in the twenty-first century.


Comments: (7)

Ferne
Richard Bentall unabashedly presents searing truths about psychiatry's cozy relationship with drug companies. One of his contentions is that most SSRI antidepressants are virtually inert, only slightly more effective than a placebo. Never-the-less, a strident and undaunted pharmaceutical industry -- with a well-healed cadre of its defenders in the ranks of psychiatry and psychology -- marches on placing profit before ethics. After reading this book, one wonders what a dissonant mind-set many psychiatrists must find themselves in after decades of writing antidepressant (and antipsychotic) prescriptions, only to now learn that research doesn't support their purported efficacy. Does one say, "I've been a charlatan all these years?" Or, does one shoot the messenger?

Bentall challenges the psychiatric industry to begin treating their patients as people, not as objects. He ardently questions the intentions behind 15 minute office visits, saying it is not only inadequate time to get to know a patient and their personal issues, but it also shows a distancing arrogance that disrespects the troubled person. Bentall espouses virtues of integrity, compassion, and kindness. Qualities he will not likely be afforded by many of his colleagues in psychiatry and psychology who may feel defensively compelled to levy counterattacks upon reading this forthright book.

As a therpaist of 39 years, I found courage and validation in reading Doctoring The Mind. And a resoluteness to put sincere care above profit while affording each patient a more gentle professionalism in my final years.
Wen
This is a generally well-written thoughtful critique of psychiatry. Bentall very carefully outlines the moral and empirical objections to a paradigm that is increasingly being questioned by health care professionals. This book is not written by someone who is not qualified to do so. Bentall possesses the background for such a project and does a fine job here although much of his focus is on schizophrenia. The picture is much broader than this. Typically criticisms aimed at psychiatry are treated as if they are produced by uninformed and uneducated people with a personal axe to grind, and there is one review on Amazon written by someone obviously not familiar with the issues that pans this book. I would advise reading the numerous other sources that also objectively look at the evidence against the effectiveness of pure biological models of behavior. Much of the evidence is in the form of careful reviews of the actual research used by pharmaceutical companies and research psychiatry to support their claims. As a biologically-trained health care professional myself, I find that I am in agreement with many of these criticisms. In this vein I would suggest also looking closely at Whitaker's Anatomy of an Epidemic and Kirsch's The Emperor's New Drugs if you would like to learn more.
Thomeena
Prof Bentall has done it again and this time has not pulled any punches. It is no wonder there are psychiatrists up in arms over this book. I hope prof Bentall does the speech circuit. Rather than appealing to emotion, in a very emotive topic, the book systematically reviews the evidence that there is little direct support for the existing disease model of mental illness. In training, I was schooled in Popper's view that theory can never be proven but only disproven, and even a long existing positive finding can be undone by a single negative finding. If psychiatry ascribes to be a science then it must abide by its founding principles and argue their case without emotion. Prof Bentall presents this evidence in a cold light for the reading to judge for themselves. If he is wrong, then he is wrong. If he is right, then...
Meztisho
Wide-ranging critique of the medical model of schizophrenia. Well worth the read and still relevant
Zolorn
Well written, good alternative point of view. Therapists should read this. Individually they sometimes help people, but collectively they may be making us worse.
Karon
I found this book very helpful. Anything Dr. Bentall writes is worth reading. I highly recommend any of his works.
Lamranilv
The book is written in a very lucid manner. Almost every assertion is substantiated by ample references. Whether you agree with the views of the author or not, this is certainly a great book!
The book is absolute rubbish written by an ambitious clinical psychologist from University of Bangor in Wales, UK. Richard Bentall knows precious nothing about diagnoses and treatments of psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, that didn't stop him from writing this silly book. Virtually unknown in the US his name should remain obscure as well as his book.

Against facts, reality, and reason he insists that psychiatric diagnoses are made up social constructs and medications designed to treat these "phantom" disorders are crime against humanity. It would be wasteful to argue with this foolish notion if not for millions of sufferers who benefit daily from pharmacological treatment and staggering suicide rate that was only slowed down in the last two decades thanks to medications.

Richard Bentall rejects the only hope our society has in fighting and conquering mental illnesses. The progress will move on with or without the professor but I believe that if someone he loves becomes mentally ill (I hope that we won't have to see the proof) he'll drop pretense and reach for the pill.
Doctoring the Mind: Is Our Current Treatment of Mental Illness Really Any Good? download epub
Social Sciences
Author: Richard P. Bentall
ISBN: 0814791484
Category: Other
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: NYU Press (September 30, 2009)
Pages: 388 pages