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The CEO Chief Engagement Officer: Turning Hierarchy Upside Down to Drive Performance download epub

by John Smythe


Epub Book: 1597 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1924 kb.

The CEO: Chief Engagement. has been added to your Basket. John Smythe has certainly selected a business subject that attracts more attention and generates more discussion each day: employee engagement.

The CEO: Chief Engagement.

The Chief Engagement Officer explores a management philosophy which recognises the value of opening up. .The book includes a tapestry of reports from organisations who are engaging their employees to drive performance and change.

The Chief Engagement Officer explores a management philosophy which recognises the value of opening up decision making to the right groups to improve the quality of decisions and change, accelerate execution and broaden ownership. John Smythe asks what the concept of engagement means for employer and employee; tests whether and how it is different from internal communication and provides a practical framework for those who want to engage colleagues but need advice based on applied experience.

The Chief Engagement Officer explores a management philosophy which recognises the value of opening up decision making to the right groups . John Smythe has specialised in organisational communication and engagement. He is a founding partner of the Engage for Change consultancy.

Luckily, John Smythe’s book, The CEO Chief Engagement Officer .

Luckily, John Smythe’s book, The CEO Chief Engagement Officer: Turning Hierarchy Upside Down to Drive Performance provides HR with a practical field guide for understanding the engagement process and how to actually pull it off. The 226-book also contains interesting case studies of how companies are living the dream of engagement. What’s unusual is that these company examples are actually a captivating read - a rarity for most business books. In the end, he finds that authentic employee engagement comes down to opening up the decision making process to folks outside the cozy, wood-paneled confines of the C-Suite. John Smythe asks what the concept of engagement means for employer and employee; tests whether and how it is different from internal communication and provides a practical framework for those who want to engage colleagues but need advice based on applied experience

The Chief Engagement Officer explores a management philosophy which recognises the value of opening up decision making to the right groups .

The Chief Engagement Officer explores a management philosophy which recognises the value of opening up decision .

The Chief Engagement Officer explores a management philosophy which recognises the value of opening up decision making to the right groups to improve the quality of decisions and change, accelerate execution and broaden ownership; in other words, engage employees.

Start by marking The Ceo: Chief Engagement Officer: Turning Hierarchy Upside Down to Drive Performance as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

item 4 The CEO - The Chief Engagement Officer by John Smythe -The . This book includes a tapestry of reports from organizations who are engaging their employees to drive performance and change.

item 4 The CEO - The Chief Engagement Officer by John Smythe -The CEO - The Chief Engagement Officer by John Smythe. Free postage -CEO : The Chief Engagement Officer : Turning Hierarchy Upside Down to Drive .item 7 The CEO: Chief Engagement Officer - 9780566085611 -The CEO: Chief Engagement Officer - 9780566085611.

The Chief Engagement Officer is a highly readable guide to the revolution that is needed in employee communication and organisational leadership from one of the most experienced and well-regarded experts on employee communication. Download from free file storage

The Chief Engagement Officer is a highly readable guide to the revolution that is needed in employee communication and organisational leadership from one of the most experienced and well-regarded experts on employee communication. Download from free file storage.

You may be a senior executive wondering how to engage hundreds or thousands of employees in your vision, strategy or the transformation of the business; or a specialist in HR, communication and change, tasked with the challenge of 'aligning and mobilising' your people. In either case, you no longer want compliant people, you want individuals who will engage their creativity at work. For their part, engaged employees want a say in their work and in how the business changes. The Chief Engagement Officer explores a management philosophy which recognises the value of opening up decision making to the right groups to improve the quality of decisions and change, accelerate execution and broaden ownership. John Smythe asks what the concept of engagement means for employer and employee; tests whether and how it is different from internal communication and provides a practical framework for those who want to engage colleagues but need advice based on applied experience. The book includes a tapestry of reports from organisations who are engaging their employees to drive performance and change. The author demonstrates how powerful models, developed from his work at SmytheDorwardLambert, his time as an organisational fellow with McKinsey and Company, and his consultancy with Engage for Change, can be used to take this process forward in any organisation. The Chief Engagement Officer is a highly readable guide to the revolution that is needed in employee communication and organisational leadership from one of the most experienced and well-regarded experts on employee communication.

Comments: (2)

Rasmus
John Smythe has certainly selected a business subject that attracts more attention and generates more discussion each day: employee engagement. At the outset, I acknowledge that, contrary to what this book's subtitle suggests, a hierarchy need not be turned "upside down" to drive performance. All organizations need order and structure as well as policies and procedures, given the importance of full compliance with applicable federal, state, and regulatory legalities.

That said, Smythe does not propose the creation of a senior-level executive position. Rather, he correctly stresses the importance of formulating and then implementing a program that will maximize employee engagement throughout an organization, at all levels and in all areas. This program will focus on preparing everyone with supervisory responsibilities to help achieve that objective. Paraphrasing one of Jim Collins' most widely cited recommendations in Good to Great, Smythe explains that, for him, "employee engagement is first and foremost a management philosophy based on the idea of including the right people in the right decisions at the right time in the right way. Inclusion in decision making and change is not a one-way ticket for employees to butt their noses in wherever and however they want. Leadership sets the boundaries and governs the process; and citizens in the process have responsibilities to behave as partners in the process."

Throughout his narrative, Smythe responds to questions such as these:

1. What is employee engagement and why is it so important?
2. What are the most common barriers to achieving it?
3. How to overcome these barriers?
4. Which four approaches to achieving employee engagement should be considered?
5. How to select the most appropriate approach?
6. Why is measuring employee engagement "a waste of time"?
7. How to identify the "key drivers"?
8. Which principles and lessons should guide and inform the design of an employee engagement program?
9. How and why does employee engagement drive implementation of strategy?
10. How to create and then sustain a culture of employee engagement?

I especially appreciate Smythe's provision of 40 "Figures" that consolidate key points within each chapter because they facilitate, indeed expedite periodic review later. In Chapter 2, for example, he explains what employee engagement means and includes four Figures: "Requisites for engagement," "Drivers to deliver a distinct customer offer and a compelling place to work," "Communications and engagement," and "Two views of employee engagement." He skillfully correlates this material with statements such as this: "I see employee engagement as being about the role and influence people have been given in everyday decision making and in broader organizational change and strategy. I see it as a practical capability which can be developed by leaders at every level to help them create value for the organization by engaging the right people in decision forming and by doing so creating an attractive workplace experience where people can influence and feel ownership."

To repeat, what Smythe proposes will not create organizational chaos by eliminating management authority altogether; rather, he proposes that the concept of "authority" be redefined, then be distributed (in effect) on an as-needed basis. If Joe Moderatz is being asked to design a more efficient system by which to allocate storage space in the Cooksey Corporation's warehouse, for example, he should be centrally involved in decisions made concerning the objectives to be achieved, the core processes that must be taken into full account (e.g. the impact of the new system on processes in other areas), and the timeframe during which the new system will be design and implemented. In essence, Moderatz shares ownership of the completion of this task. Therefore, he will feel engaged because he is engaged.

Presumably Smythe would be the first to agree that it would be a fool's errand for a reader of this book to attempt to implement all of his (Smythe's) recommendations. Although he provides a five-step "practical model" in Chapter 5, suggests several methods and approaches to employee engagement interventions in Chapter 9, and includes, in Chapter 12 (the final chapter) Johanna Fawkes's overview of recent research (largely between 2000 and 2005) in the field of employee engagement, it remains for each reader to determine which of the material in this book is most relevant to the needs, interests, objectives, and resources of her or his oganization. However, Fawkes does conclude his own analysis by noting that if he had the opportunity to work with one of the various approaches (previously discussed) to create a sustainable climate of engagement, "it would involve focusing on the supervisor's perceptions of what leading means in terms of giving their people the opportunity to contribute to day-to-day decision making and change."

* * * * *

Those who share my high regard for this book are urged to check out The Engaged Employee Network ([...]) founded and administered by David Zinger. I also recommend Transparency: How Leaders Create a Culture of Candor co-authored by Warren Bennis, Daniel Goleman, and James O'Toole with Patricia Ward Biederman as well as Paul Spiegelman's Why is Everyone Smiling? The Secret Behind Passion, Productivity, and Profit, Sarah Cook's The Essential Guide to Employee Engagement: Better Business Performance through Staff Satisfaction, David Croston's Employee Engagement: The People First Approach to Building a Business, Richard H. Axelrod's Terms of Engagement: Changing the Way We Change Organizations, and Michael L. Stallard's Fired Up or Burned Out: How to Reignite Your Team's Passion, Creativity, and Productivity.
Otrytrerl
This is one of the most significant books for internal communicators in 25 years. Not since Roger D'Aprix's Communicating for Productivity in 1982 has there been a book more likely to impact what communicators do on the job than this one.

Drawing on research conducted by the author and consulting firm McKinsey & Company, the book argues that change is more likely to be successful at the involve end of the "tell, sell, consult, involve" spectrum (or in Smythe's terminology "telling, selling, inclusion, co-creation"). Nothing new here. But the argument is strongly put that:

...internal communication ....is in danger of becoming an overused and corrupted tool of the command-and-control leadership style. Many internal communicators find themselves to be little more than post hoc sense makers running behind their bosses trying to craft coherent messages. (p.173)

On the basis of his research with McKinsey, Smythe argues that:

...employee engagement is significantly driven by the degree to which people are usefully included in the decision-making process both day-to-day and in big-ticket change, crisis and transformation. (p.5)

The underlying discipline which influences the practice of employee communication needs to shift from mass marketing to individual and collective learning. (p.11) ...Such a shift will require a complete rewrite of the way organisations communicate and engage with leaders and employees. (p.12)

It's an easy read with 12 chapters and just over 200 pages. It has more than 40 diagrams and tables, many summary lists, excellent case studies, a good reference list and index.

Having said that, the book is not perfect. Hopefully many of the problems can be rectified in a second edition. The font size used in some of the diagrams is miniscule. I think the chapter structure needs reviewing, and there are many parts that could be written more clearly. Much of the difficulty comes from the author's struggle throughout the entire book with what employee engagement actually is:

I define employee engagement narrowly as an integral part of decision making, as distinct from broader definitions arguing that involvement in decision making is no longer an occasional concession but a necessity for bosses to release the wisdom and experience of their people. (p.30)

However, many of the bullet point lists are spot on. For example

...engagement can be defined as successful by the degree to which
participants:
- identify with the need or opportunity for change;
- own and feel responsibility for their part in making it happen;
- are disposed to discretionary action;
- have insight about the need or opportunity for personal change and growth in the context of the change;
- can see how all the elements of change/strategy fit together. (p.31)

A major shortcoming of the book is that the research the book is based on is reported only anecdotally. (I recall a professor dismissing Deal & Kennedy's landmark work on Corporate Cultures on the basis that it was anecdotal.) Even the excellent chapter on "Employee engagement - a review of the literature" (contributed by Johanna Fawkes) does not provide hard data on the Smythe/McKinsey research findings, only the 2x2 matrix model used in the book.

The long chapter "Measuring employee satisfaction is a waste of time" expresses many logical and useful views, but would benefit from a good rework by a measurement specialist who is expert in such things as correlational analysis, confidence levels and survey item design. For example, I believe there needs to be a distinction made between (all) drivers and key drivers of engagement. Despite the various discussions of this, no correlation coefficients are shown.

I also feel the title of the book is ambiguous, perhaps deliberately so. The cover says The CEO Chief Engagement Officer but the title page reads The CEO: The Chief Engagement Officer. The implication of the latter is that it is the CEO who is the chief engagement officer. But throughout the book there are many mentions that

Every leader, from chief executive officer to call centre supervisor now has the added function of chief engagement officer. (p.60)

Curiously, at the time of writing, Amazon (US) has the book listed as being titled Engaging Employees: how to create a communication culture that delivers. This original title is a more accurate one.

Nevertheless, this is a "must buy" book. Don't get too distracted by the author's debate as to what employee engagement is. Simply consider it to be "discretionary effort" and concentrate on how to achieve it with Smythe's countless brilliant insights. Change your communication approaches to reflect the philosophical change recommended and you will make a step-change in your organisational effectiveness. Strongly recommended.
The CEO Chief Engagement Officer: Turning Hierarchy Upside Down to Drive Performance download epub
Social Sciences
Author: John Smythe
ISBN: 0566085615
Category: Other
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Gower (June 30, 2007)
Pages: 226 pages