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The Metamorphosis of the Given: Toward an Ecology of Consciousness (Revisioning Philosophy) download epub

by Jean Schwartzkopf


Epub Book: 1375 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1589 kb.

Given are the perceptual world and all organizing systems of the mind

Given are the perceptual world and all organizing systems of the mind. Not-given is the act of the human spirit of giving attention and new meaning; these are not given, because only the human being can give them. The conversation of humanity reflects this interaction The Metamorphosis of the Given leads us to experience reality as a product of what is given and not-given. Given are the perceptual world and all organizing systems of the mind.

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The Metamorphosis of the Given: Toward an Ecology of Consciousness (Revisioning Philosophy). by Jean Schwartzkopf.

Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Kinds of Minds: Toward an Understanding of. .Perhaps what we are seeing in this book is the spectacle. Kinds of Minds: Toward an Understanding of Consciousness. by Daniel C. Dennett. The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 94, No. 2 (Fe. 1997), pp. 97-103. of the world's most original philosopher of mind already beginning. to change color, half way toward a ed. new theory of. sentience, yet so far not ready to acknowledge it even to himself. He explains the application of 'true'.

TOWARD A SCIENCE OF CONSCIOUSNESS 2011 IN ISRAEL Consciousness, Emotion and Self Next years TSC will take place in Tel Aviv, Israel in the spring. Along with rigorous discussions of philosophy of mind, brain and beyond, this conference will focus on the interplay between self, emotion and consciousness. Hosts of the conference include leading neuroscientists Prof. Talma Hendler from Tel Aviv University and Dr. Abraham Zangen from the Weizmann Institute.

One of the most impressive feats in philosophy today is to understand Immanuel Kant

One of the most impressive feats in philosophy today is to understand Immanuel Kant. I’ve bashed my own head against his books a few times - little gets through. How might this foundation in the primacy of consciousness inform philosophy, and our lives, at large? We can experience, for ourselves, the many unknown rooms in the labyrinth of consciousness.

Read "Ecology of Consciousness The Alchemy of Personal, Collective, and Planetary Transformation" by Ralph .

In book: Re-visioning Psychiatry: Cultural Phenomenology, Critical . of the complex, hierarchical, and interactional processes that give rise to. psychopathology.

Cite this publication. Laurence J. Kirmayer. working with a neurological notion of personhood in which Iammy. brain and my suffering reflects bad chemicals or structural changes. Diagnostic assessment and effective interventions will.

The Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness graduate program offers both masters and doctoral degrees as part .

The Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness graduate program offers both masters and doctoral degrees as part of the School of Consciousness and Transformation at the California Institute of Integral Studies. As with other programs at CIIS, PCC combines an academic curriculum with a broadly spiritual approach to learning, including Romantic and other Western esoteric influences. The spirit underlying the creation of the PCC program emerged in part during a three-year conference entitled Revisioning Philosophy that was held in the late 1980s at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, CA.

Transitive Consciousness. In addition to describing creatures as conscious in these various senses, there are also related senses in which creatures are described as being conscious of various things. States might also be regarded as conscious in a narrative sense that appeals to the notion of the stream of consciousness, regarded as an ongoing more or less serial narrative of episodes from the perspective of an actual or merely virtual self. The idea would be to equate the person's conscious mental states with those that appear in the stream (Dennett 1991, 1992).

The Metamorphosis of the Given leads us to experience reality as a product of what is given and not-given. Given are the perceptual world and all organizing systems of the mind. Not-given is the act of the human spirit of giving attention and new meaning; these are not given, because only the human being can give them. The conversation of humanity reflects this interaction between the human spirit and the world. In this process the feeling of reality changes and gives birth to possibilities for a new, emerging shared paradigm.

Comments: (2)

Jode
I have to concur with the previous comment on this book and admit: yes, it is indeed a very difficult book.
At the same time, the key ideas expressed in the book are so beautiful, poignant, and relevant at this point of the evolution of the human species that this book could not possibly be more relevant in the philosophical discourse happening today. Once you get past the difficulties of the schools of thought reviewed in the first chapters (it does presuppose prior knowledge of basics of philosophy) the core idea of the book is actually a simple one, which is outlined with some redundancy but in the end becomes clearer and sharper as the book progresses.
The world is made of a dynamic dance of two realities: given, and not given. One seems "finished" to us, because it is unquestioned, we grow socialized into it, and it represents the boundaries of our agency. It also represents the lens through which we see the world and that are constraining what we see. That is in essence the "given". The other is the reality of our capacity to add meaning, especially *new* meaning, to pre-existing perceptual and conceptual elements before us. That is the "not given", because we have to give something of our own unique creative forces to bring it to life. This is for instance the capacity to think a new thought, unconstrained and unbound by any feeling of conceptual necessity of what we have been taught to experience. In a sense, it is "free will" that Schwarzkopf is pointing to, but with an important difference. The author is deepening the conversation because earlier in history of science we have been used to see *manifestations* of our free will, but never have had a rigorous teaching on the processes by which such free-willed initiative is originated. Here the book continues the conversation on spiritual science initiated by Steiner a century ago, giving more insights into how to witness this type of freedom in the making. It is a fundamental capacity because it is the place where paradigms are originated: in the capacity to re-create reality by a more conscious act of seeing things anew. Towards the end, the book explores the possible implications of what would it mean for pedagogy, health, therapy, and other areas. To assume that there is a "not given" that each of us is longing to contribute to the world, and suggesting ways of cultivating the capacities to use that creative power, is a necessary revolution in how we approach education, and medicine. Just for the sake of two simple examples:
Imagine the potential to tap into the power of a true cooperation with the learners in making meaning of what the world around them is, and empower them to contribute to their creative re-shaping by stepping into their power.
Or think of how medicine is changing today when the more progressive and patient-centered approaches are intentionally recognizing the crucial role of a full participation of the patient and her complete understanding, consent, and emotional resources that can be brought into the healing process.
For this, Scharzkopf's contribution is a truly important one. If anyone has read this book and is interested in translating the core messages into some other formats (blog posts, workshop formats, pedagogical experiences, etc) I would be most happy to work together to make this content more accessible. (I can be found on twitter as eccemarco)
Bil
This is not a simple book, it is in fact the Schwarzkopf's PhD dissertation in philosophy. As such one would not expect it to be straighforward, and as forseen there is much which is not explained throughout the book, simple terms such as "world", "spirit", "I" etc take on new meanings, if not, then they are considered in new contexts for which the unprepared reader is not ready. A reasonably deep understanding of the British empiricists is also required before attempting this book, the very brief summaries of the achievements of Locke, Hume etc are not adequate unless you already have at least a brief understanding. At times there are confusions and ambiguity.
To the main contribution, this entails an attempt at understanding the world through the fascinating concepts of given and not given, given being those things which are given to consciousness without any extra effort by a person, not given includes, especially, the focusing of attention and awareness to the moment. Note that the actual potential for the use of the attentive faculty is given, its actual use is not. Schwarzkopf tries to resolve much of the dualism present in most people thinking by using this complementary approach to realise the already present unified world which is broken up by the mind. It is a wonderful idea following much of Rudolf Steiner's and Georg Kuehlewind's work as a starting point. It is in many ways enlightening but is also caught up in the afforementioned ambiguity inherent in the use of every day language. This stops the average reader from really understanding what is being said. Contrast this with "The Logos Structure of the World" (Kuehlewind) which is written in more obtuse language but nonetheless captures the essence on a second or third reading. I did not find this to be the case here. Remarkable ideas but requiring better explanation.
The Metamorphosis of the Given: Toward an Ecology of Consciousness (Revisioning Philosophy) download epub
Social Sciences
Author: Jean Schwartzkopf
ISBN: 0820425850
Category: Other
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Peter Lang Inc., International Academic Publishers (April 1, 1995)
Pages: 210 pages