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Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life download epub

by E.F.N. Jephcott,Theodor W. Adorno


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The damage to which Adorno refers has been visited on all of us, not just those who were forced to flee Nazi tyranny and the horrors of its death camps

The damage to which Adorno refers has been visited on all of us, not just those who were forced to flee Nazi tyranny and the horrors of its death camps. The damage is inherent in the factory metaphor introduced at the outset, and that encumbers us as we continue with our lives. In truth, following Adorno, the productive freedom and unfettered leisure attendant to occupying a role in the factory are, in fact, intrusively scripted.

Theodor Adorno Translated from the G e r m a n by E. F. N. Jephcott. Picture-book w thout pictures 140 Intention and reproduction 141 All the world's not a stage 143 Damper and drum 14S Palace o f Janus 146 Monad 148 Bequest 1S0 ; Gold assay iSz Sur TEau, 55. PART. VERSO London, New York.

Minima Moralia: Reflections From Damaged Life (German: Minima Moralia: Reflexionen aus dem beschädigten Leben) is a 1951 book by the philosopher Theodor W. Adorno and a seminal text in critical theory

Minima Moralia: Reflections From Damaged Life (German: Minima Moralia: Reflexionen aus dem beschädigten Leben) is a 1951 book by the philosopher Theodor W. Adorno and a seminal text in critical theory. Adorno started writing it during World War II, in 1944, while he lived as an exile in America, and completed it in 1949. It was originally written for the fiftieth birthday of his friend and collaborator Max Horkheimer, who had co-authored the earlier book Dialectic of Enlightenment with Adorno.

Categories: Other Social Sciences\Philosophy.

Theodor W. Adorno, Edmund . Jephcott (Translator). Dec 04, 2010 Nick Ramsey rated it it was amazing.

Built from aphorisms and reflections, he shifts in register from personal . Translated by. E.

Built from aphorisms and reflections, he shifts in register from personal experience to the most general theoretical problems. Bibliographic information.

by Theodor Adorno & E. Be grateful for whoever comes, because each has been sent as a guide from beyond. How To Stop Worrying And Start Living. 01 MB·111,920 Downloads. the captain standing on the bridge, could press a button and-presto! to live with 'day-tight compartments' as the most.

Minima Moralia: Reflections on a Damaged Life Radical thinkers. Adorno: Gesammelte Geschriften. TW Adorno, R Tiedemann. Minima Moralia: Reflections From Damaged Life (Radical Thinkers) Author: Theodor Adorno, EFN Jephcott, Publisher: Ver. T Adorno. Soziologische Schriften: Hrsg. Dialética do esclarecimento. T Adorno, M Horkheimer.


Comments: (7)

Morlunn
Minima Moralia is a modern take on Aristotle's Magna Moralia for a post-fascist world. This volume contains some of Adorno's most beautiful prose and, contrary to what some have said, I don't think his writing in translation in difficult. Compared to other German philosophers in the tradition he was working in, his prose style and allusions are crystal clear, and are dense in the aphoristic style of nineteenth century German philosophy. Some minimal background is needed to understand where he is coming from, but to a basically educated reader, Minima Moralia should come across as a brief, interesting read on the downfallen tendency of industrial society in the depressive vein. I don't like Verso's edition of this or other works--the sandpaper background is ugly, and doesn't even have a sandpaper texture--but that is no fault of Adorno or his translator. Necessary reading--a desert island book.
Malojurus
I was glad to see this listed
Memuro
For a long time, I'd wanted to read "Minima Moralia." I knew it would be a daunting task. And, it was.
But, it was worth the time and the increased folds in my brow. I came into contact with one of the world's
great minds and critical thinkers. His words expanded both my world view and my inner view.
It's best read in small, incremental doses. That's the way it is written. It's not pleasure reading. It's
like reading for a college exam on a multitude of esoteric subjects. But, it's time well-spent.
Lonesome Orange Kid
oh i love this book and carry it everywhere
Terr
Good read
thrust
Adorno at his undisputed best.
Eta
Dis is puro...firme vato locs. Down for Adorno por vida..Smile now, Cry later..
When reading Theodor Adorno's Minima Moralia, I've found it useful to bear in mind a specific metaphor or ideal-type. Specifically, think of the world as a 1950's vintage factory in which everything that exists is produced. Even the people, who ostensibly operate the factory, in a darkly dialectic twist of irony, are produced by the factory. Ideas, too, are factory products, manifestations of technology intensive means-ends, dollar-valued rationality. The factory, thus, has become the source -- the producer -- of its own ethos, where all measures are stubbornly quantitative in a thoroughgoing positivistic sense.

In view of the all-encompassing breadth of its task, the division of labor is immeasurably complex. The behavior of any person in any productive role is nominally free, at least within the constraints imposed by maximally productive technique, especially as that is manifest in the material means of automation. Leisure time, moreover, is nominally devoid of productive constraints, equipment, and procedures manuals. Adjustment to the factory regime is the strongest evidence that a person is a mature adult.

While the factory putatively includes everyone and all benefit accordingly, compensation for the occupants of the role of Big Capital is exaggerated to a degree that is commensurate with its ostensibly over-riding importance. Individual manifestations of Big Capital are aware of their contribution and the presumed justice of their material reward, but they are blithely oblivious to the fact that they, too, are factory products, as is their dollar-valued contribution. For them to think otherwise would approximate an unimaginable act roughly comparable to viewing the outside of the entire outer rim of the universe from the inside. Just as that image makes no sense, there is no vantage point from which late capitalism, the referent for the factory metaphor, could look at itself from the outside.

Only when we address the position and role of Big Capital do we begin to come to grips with the primary substance that runs throughout Adorno's Minima Moralis: Reflection from Damaged Life. The damage to which Adorno refers has been visited on all of us, not just those who were forced to flee Nazi tyranny and the horrors of its death camps. The damage is inherent in the factory metaphor introduced at the outset, and that encumbers us as we continue with our lives.

In truth, following Adorno, the productive freedom and unfettered leisure attendant to occupying a role in the factory are, in fact, intrusively scripted. However, since everyone was born, raised, and socialized into adulthood within the factory, a rationally scripted life is second nature to all. Readers who have worked through Adorno's book The Culture Industry will understand this in concrete detail, and the factory metaphor is useful shorthand for a fully developed sociology of critical knowledge. The factory is all there is, and it constitutes the totality of individual and collective experience. The factory is all that can be known.

Within the factory, the only rationality is intrinsic to the readily measurable process of production. Much as in Horkheimer and Adorno's Dialectic of Enlightenment, alternative standards have neither precedent nor purpose. After all, production is for capital accumulation and consumption, and the commodities consumed are meant for those who fill the manifold positions throughout the factory. When presented in this way, in the context afforded by the factory metaphor, no other form of rationality seems useful or even conceivable. The exclusive pervasiveness of a model of rationality based on purely quantitative means-ends relationships seems as sensibly and destructively prefigured as Horkheimer described it in Eclipse of Reason.

Adorno's excursions into areas seemingly not subsumed by the commoditizing factory ideal-type, including considerable attention to the lives of women, are not adventitious. Instead, they reveal the consequences for people and their social context when, though for some it may seem otherwise, all of life is contained in the factory and imbued with the factory culture. People produced as commodities and reckoned in terms of exchange value and who think and feel accordingly bring very little joy to themselves or others. This is something for which they have not been scripted.

The cumulativity of work by Adorno and other members of The Critical School is no accident. The constraints, compulsions, relationships, and cultural substance intrinsic to the factory metaphor are pervasive throughout the work of Critical School theorists. Their brilliance inheres, in good part, in their shared sensitivity to the ways in which the processes they described have imbued all institutions, organizations, and modes of expression that we, in our various locations in the factory, have come to take for granted. The all pervasiveness of the rationalized, standardized, and scripted social and cultural influences invoked by Adorno may help to explain why Minima Moralia took its particular aphoristic and short essay form: using a multitude of examples from a broad range of topically distinct domains, Adorno emphasized the immanence of his theme.

Adorno's ability to adopt a thoroughly critical position, something unimaginable from inside the metaphorical factory, seems closely tied to his position as a German emigre who moved to England and the United States, returning to Germany after the end of World War II. Adorno, as with other members of The Critical School, spent much of his life as an outsider. Unassimilated but enabled by the tools of rigorous scholarship, Adorno gained access to insights and an over-arching perspective available only to one who was marginalized, and in that sense independent of the taken-for-granted substance of the world view that cripplingly inculcated so many others. The War destroyed Adorno's native Germany, gave horrific meaning to otherwise unexceptional names such as Auschwitz and Treblinka, and demonstrated that the cold and indifferent logic of the factory metaphor was intrinsic not only to capitalism but to the most extreme forms of fascism,

Furthermore, writing in the 1940's, the processes that were creating what has become an international capitalist system, when compared with present circumstances, were at a relatively early stage of development. The factory metaphor had not yet come to cover the entire world, including nominally socialist states. Spontaneity, eccentricity, and creativity were still occasionally possible without calling into question the fidelity and sanity of those exhibiting these non-standardized ways of behaving. The rationality of the factory model did not yet completely preclude them. Social and cultural domination was still incomplete, and the workings of Big Capital were primarily a national rather than an international phenomenon.

Minima Moralia is a dense, wide-ranging, and difficult book. Its primary concerns, however, are pretty simple: the domination and denaturing of human beings, rendering them to the status of commodities, made and unmade in terms suggested by the factory metaphor. I think that Adorno sometimes ranges too far afield and covers too much too obliquely, now and then with a hint of banality. Nevertheless, this is a brilliant book, written by one whose scholarly attainments are beyond question and who demands a great deal of his readers.

As a final thoroughly ironic thought, in spite of all the praise I've given him, I think that Adorno is over-rated. Yes, he's interesting but not THAT interesting. I think that his enduring influence is an instance of fame winning out over good judgment. Truth be told, Adorno is more of a determined plodder than a brilliant thinker.
Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life download epub
Philosophy
Author: E.F.N. Jephcott,Theodor W. Adorno
ISBN: 0902308580
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Philosophy
Language: English
Publisher: Verso; New edition edition (March 1978)
Pages: 251 pages