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Genesis and Structure of Hegel's "Phenomenology of Spirit" (Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy) download epub

by Samuel Cherniak,John Heckman,Jean Hyppolite


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Jean Hyppolite produced the first French translation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.

Jean Hyppolite produced the first French translation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. His major works-the translation. Jean Hyppolite (January 8, 1907 in Jonzac, France – October 26, 1968 in Paris, France) was a French philosopher known for championing the work of Hegel, and other German philosophers, and educating some of France's most prominent post-war thinkers. Series: Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy.

To read Hegel’s ‘Phenomenology of Spirit’ is to love it. I’ve never read a book that grabbed me from the first . This work is the fruit much study of Hegel's texts and thought. A significant aid in any understanding not only of the Phenomenology, but of all of Hegel's thought. I’ve never read a book that grabbed me from the first paragraph onward as that book did. It has an ebb and flow that scratches the itch of that part of the mind that lies beyond the ordinary and takes one beyond the appearance of reality and transcends one to the thoughts between the thoughts such that it makes one realize that authenticity must be jealous of irony.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers Judith Stout 9d ago. Genesis and Structure of Hegel's "Phenomenology of Spirit" (Studies in Phenom.

Similar books and articles Jean Hyppolite - 1974 - Northwestern University Press. Xiao-Mang Deng - 2010 - Modern Philosophy 4:67-71

Similar books and articles. Genesis and Structure of Hegel's "Phenomenology of Spirit". Jean Hyppolite - 1974 - Northwestern University Press. L'attività Intersoggettiva E La Cosa Stessa Nella "fenomenologia Dello Spirito": Due Letture A Confronto. Xiao-Mang Deng - 2010 - Modern Philosophy 4:67-71. In the Spirit of Hegel: A Study of G. W. F. Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit,. Robert C. Solomon - 1983 - Oxford University Press. Existential Themes in Hegel’s Phenomenology.

Jean Hyppolite produced the first French translation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit

Jean Hyppolite produced the first French translation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.

Genesis and Structure of Hegel's ''Phenomenology of Spirit''. Jean Hyppolite, Samuel Cherniak, John Heckman. Download (pdf, 1. 0 Mb) Donate Read.

Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy. Jean Hyppolite produced the first French translation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit

Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy. Jean Hyppolite produced the first French translation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.

Hegel’s philosophy is a phenomenology insofar as he looks at the world as it. .The Phenomenology of Spirit is structured in two stages

Hegel’s philosophy is a phenomenology insofar as he looks at the world as it appears to consciousness. This science of phenomena aims to capture the essence of things in the world. The method developed by Hegel is that the dialectic of contradictions and exceed via a new phase of the synthesis. This dialectical method will be decisive in the history of philosophy and influence Husserl, Sartre and especially Marx, who thinks the economic and social history in terms of the Hegelian dialectic. The Phenomenology of Spirit is structured in two stages: A-historical approach: the adventures of consciousness and the transition to self-awareness (Chapters 1-5).

He shows that temporality is centrally involved in the movement of thinking called phenomenology of spirit

He shows that temporality is centrally involved in the movement of thinking called phenomenology of spirit. The text of Martin Heidegger's 1930-1931 lecture course on Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit contains some of Heidegger's most crucial statements about temporality, ontological difference and dialectic, and being and time in Hegel.

Jean Hyppolite produced the first French translation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. His major works--the translation, his commentary, and Logique et existence (1953)--coincided with an upsurge of interest in Hegel following World War II. Yet Hyppolite's influence was as much due to his role as a teacher as it was to his translation or commentary: Foucault and Deleuze were introduced to Hegel in Hyppolite's classes, and Derrida studied under him. More than fifty years after its original publication, Hyppolite's analysis of Hegel continues to offer fresh insights to the reader.

Comments: (4)

Fearlessdweller
A clear presentation of the movement of the PhG; a good companion to Hypolite's own translation. The section on "Observing reason" very helpful in making sense of this confusing section.
Tygrarad
EIDOS-FORMS, AS EIDOS-FORCE = “INHERENT-FIRST- PRINCIPLES”:

Kojeve took the master--/slave parable and made it the hermeneutical principle for interpreting all of Hegel’s PHENOMENOLOGY. Hyppolite takes “eidos-as-force” and makes it the hermeneutical principle for interpreting all of Hegel’s PHENOMENOLOGY; thereby leaving us with a self-actuating hypostatic-union. EIDOS FORCE EMERGES AS:

1. Sensate object
2. Sensate subject
3. Return & perception
4. Dialogue-threshold & AUFGEHOBEN
5. Eidos-forms as lexical network
6. Eidos as simple-coherence
7. Eidos as law-of-dialectic
8. Eidos as praxis imperative
9. Play of forces
10. Hypostatic union
11. Tendency as vanishing-moments

This profound articulation of Hegel is mandatory for any serious student of philosophy. And for discovering that for Hegel; EIDOS can only exist as MOVEMENT. 5 stars for scholarly brilliance.
Macage
Like the other reviewer of this book, I would not suggest this as a replacement to the reading of Hegel's Phenomenology. It is, rather, a good thing to read after you have worked through the Phenomenology on your own, or while you are studying it in a class. It is not really an introduction to Hegel, and shouldn't be read first. This is mainly because Hyppolite stays very close to the text of Hegel. Often, when you want him to just say what Hegel means in a passage, Hyppolite ends up saying something that amounts more to a paraphrase than a literal explication in simpler terms. That is fine, though, if what you are interested in is discussing this rich text on its own terms with someone who has clearly spent a lot of time with it and who knows the Hegelian corpus intimately. In his refusal to simply say what Hegel means in terms other than the ones Hegel employs (or rather: in terms other than Hyppolite's own French translations of Hegel's German terms, that are for this text translated into English), Hyppolite appears to be responding to his contemporary Kojeve, who does sometimes take Hegel too literally, and -- while his readings are always incredibly illuminating and persuasive -- appears to put too much weight on some of the early moves of Hegel's self-consciousness chapter while failing to appreciate its later developments.

You should go to Hyppolite as to a very intelligent companion, who has spent a lot of time with a text that you also are interested in, not as a first source of instruction. I would never suggest you use commentaries as a way into Hegel's text without at least beginning to grapple with the text on your own -- since it's too easy to find yourself trapped by the seeming obviousness of one way of reading the text -- but I know first hand that if you try to do this with Hyppolite you won't get too far. Better companion texts for a first read would be Charles Taylor's "Hegel" (which is not always accurate and precise, but is always clear and gives a good general take on the various stages of Hegel's book that helps you not to be totally lost in the details), and John Russon's "Reading Hegel's Phenomenology" (which has the advantage of consisting of several relatively independent chapters that can each be read on its own as a commentary on the various sections of Hegel's book, and which does an exceptional job connecting up the themes of each chapter with themes that each of us must grapple with in our everyday life).

Hyppolite does identify several of the historical and literary references that Hegel has in mind, and amplify and expand on points that Hegel touches on briefly, and that can help to clarify a preliminary understanding of the text. His text's real worth, however, can only be appreciated when you've spent some time grappling with Hegel's text on its own.
Phallozs Dwarfs
In his introduction to the Phenomenology of Spirit, Hegel himself says that "[the] road can therefore be regarded as the pathway of doubt, or more precisely as the way of despair." Though Hegel didn't intend for that sentence to relate to reading the Phenomenology, I'm sure many readers felt that way while making their way through that nearly inpenetrable and poorly translated text. Despite initial appearances, the Phenomenology does make sense, and there is no better guide to Hegel's difficult thought that Jean Hyppolite's Genesis and Structure of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Hyppolite looks at the Phenomenology section by section and illuminates and concretizes Hegel's thought without reducing it. I wouldn't substitute this book for an actual reading of the Phenomenology (though it would probably work), but rather suggest that this commentary be used as an introduction to Hegel's Phenomenology or read concurrently with it. Highly recommended.
Genesis and Structure of Hegel's "Phenomenology of Spirit" (Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy) download epub
Philosophy
Author: Samuel Cherniak,John Heckman,Jean Hyppolite
ISBN: 0810105942
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Philosophy
Language: English
Publisher: Northwestern University Press; 1 edition (June 1, 1979)
Pages: 609 pages