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Standing Bear Is A Person: The True Story Of A Native American's Quest For Justice download epub

by Stephen Dando-Collins


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Stephen Dando-Collins (born 1 May 1950) is an Australian historical author and novelist, with books on antiquity, American, Australian, British, Roman and French history, and more recently the two world wars.

Stephen Dando-Collins (born 1 May 1950) is an Australian historical author and novelist, with books on antiquity, American, Australian, British, Roman and French history, and more recently the two world wars. He also writes children's novels, the first of which, Chance in a Million, (Hodder Headline, Sydney, 1998), was filmed by PolyGram as Paws, starring Billy Connolly.

He has written four books, including the acclaimed Caesar's Legion. They all came together to help Standing Bear sue for his right to be considered a "person" rather than a ward of the state, in the eyes of the law. I'm happy to say that Dando-Collins did an outstanding job of telling this story, portraying the characters and keeping the narrative flowing. It made me proud to be a Nebraskan. Over and over again, sympathetic whites from the state rallied to the Ponca cause. I'm sure there were plenty in the 1870s and 1880s who had animosity for the Nebraska tribes.

Standing Bear is a Person book.

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Australian-born scribe Dando-Collins (Caesar's Legion ) undertakes to tell the story of the Ponca tribe's landmark case against the . In 1877, Standing Bear and his people were removed.

by Stephen Dando-Collins. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

book by Stephen Dando-Collins. In a federal courtroom in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1879, Standing Bear, clan chief of the small and peaceful Ponca tribe, was in court demanding the same basic right that white Americans enjoyed-the right to be recognized legally as a human being.

Stephen Dando-Collins. Publications citing this paper. Showing 1-2 of 2 citations. Indefinite Detention, Colonialism, and Settler Prerogative in the United States. Country of Publication.

Standing Bear Is a Person is the fascinating behind-the-scenes story of that landmark 1879 court case, and the subsequent . He has written four books, including the acclaimed Caesar's Legion

Standing Bear Is a Person is the fascinating behind-the-scenes story of that landmark 1879 court case, and the subsequent reverberations of the judge's ruling across nineteenth-century America. He has written four books, including the acclaimed Caesar's Legion. From Booklist: In 1877 the Ponca Indians were forcibly and illegally removed from their fertile croplands in Nebraska and taken to barren land in Oklahoma by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Standing Bear, a clan leader, told the BIA that the land was unsuitable for farming, and that the Ponca wished to return home.

In 1877, Standing Bear and his Indian people, the Ponca, were forcibly removed from their land in northern Nebraska. In defiance, Standing Bear sued in U.S. District Court for the right to return home. In a landmark case, the judge, for the first time in U.S. history, recognized Native American rights-acknowledging that "Standing Bear is a person"-and ruled in favor of Standing Bear. Standing Bear Is a Person is the fascinating behind-the-scenes story of that landmark 1879 court case, and the subsequent reverberations of the judge's ruling across nineteenth-century America. It is also a story filled with memorable characters typical of the Old West-the crusty and wise Indian chief, Standing Bear, the Army Indian-fighting general who became a strong Indian supporter, the crusading newspaper editor who championed Standing Bear's cause, and the "most beautiful Indian maiden of her time," Bright Eyes, who became Standing Bear's national spokesperson. At a time when America was obsessed with winning the West, no matter what, this is an intensely human story and a small victory for compassion. It is also the chronicle of an American tragedy: Standing Bear won his case, but the court's decision that should have changed everything, in the end, changed very little for America's Indians.

Comments: (7)

MisterMax
I prefer novels, but my book group 'makes' me read historical works every so often. And, I'm glad, because otherwise I would not know the incredible story of Standing Bear.

Actually, this is the story of the many people who sought justice for the Native Americans. From an army general, to a newspaper editor, to clergy, to attorneys - many people fought for the rights of the Standing Bear.

As a Presbyterian minister, living in Nebraska, this book makes me proud of the ancestors that have gone before me.
FailCrew
I really got into the content of this book. Excellent details of a piece of history I had known nothing about; but, found to be extremely important in my education of Native American history.
lubov
A+
Manazar
just as expected according to description thanks!
Questanthr
Loved the good service. Have not read the book yet. All the books I ordered are for my book club for the year, that's why some have not been read.
Hono
Dee Brown wrote a chapter on the case in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, but it was a story that needed fleshing out.
Gen. Crook, Thomas Tibbles and the Omaha Indian Bright Eyes are all fascinating characters on their own, and their stories converge in one of the most important legal cases in Native American history.
I bought Standing Bear is a Person to see if Dando-Collins did service to this fascinating story.
For those who don't know, Standing Bear was a Ponca Indian who along with his people were forced out of their homeland in northwest Nebraska and resettled under god-awful conditions in Indian Territory (Now Oklahoma). He and a small band of his followers escaped and made their way north in an effort to bury the remains of his son on their ancestral lands.
He was captured, but the crusading journalist Tibbles, took up his cause along with Gen. Crook, Bright Eyes and some powerful Nebraska attorneys. They all came together to help Standing Bear sue for his right to be considered a "person" rather than a ward of the state, in the eyes of the law.
I'm happy to say that Dando-Collins did an outstanding job of telling this story, portraying the characters and keeping the narrative flowing.
It made me proud to be a Nebraskan. Over and over again, sympathetic whites from the state rallied to the Ponca cause. I'm sure there were plenty in the 1870s and 1880s who had animosity for the Nebraska tribes. In fact, most Native Americans were kicked out of the state by the time this account took place. But many Omaha citizens saw the injustice here and did what they could to right a wrong.
A few years ago, the Republicans in the Nebraska legislature had the opportunity to put Standing Bear on the back of the state quarter. They sadly passed up the opportunity.
I recommend this book to anyone who likes a great narrative nonfiction.
Stew Magnuson
Author of "The Death of Raymond Yellow Thunder."
Jube
This is a pretty good book on the Standing Bear controversy of 1879. By the end of the book, you will feel that you learned a lot about the events and the people involved. However, the footnotes are a joke as the references are cited without any corresponding page numbers. One large error occurred in the final chapter when Mr. Dando-Collins quickly tells when each of the main characters of the book, and some secondary ones, died. He forgot to include Thomas Henry Tibbles, one of the two main characters. I can't believe that no one picked this up. Doesn't anyone edit books anymore? Also, it is clear during the reading of this book that religion, or more specifically Christianity, played a huge role in the events. I feel this deserved some mention and introspection. On the one hand the Christian's believed God wanted them to have the land (Manifest Destiny) while on the other some, after the fact, wanted to defend the Indians. But why, was it to push their Christian views and make the Indians Christians and would they have helped Standing Bear if he always maintained his traditional beliefs? Most authors don't have the nerve to address this and those who believe in Christianity are probably incapable of seeing the wrong in it.
It took me about 30 pages to get into this book, but I was hooked from then on. Despite extensive reading about Native American history, I had never known the process or participants involved in granting Native people their rights as citizens. This book is factual, thought-provoking, and alternately sad and uplifting, but most of all it is interesting. The chapter about the trial, which ends with Standing Bear's address to Judge Dundy and the courtroom audience, made me cry. If Native Americans were considered savages, then what were we. The simple eloquence of this "PERSON" , his wisdom and the true humanity he posessed can be found in his words documented in this book. An excellent read and a "Keeper".
Standing Bear Is A Person: The True Story Of A Native American's Quest For Justice download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Stephen Dando-Collins
ISBN: 030681370X
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Da Capo Press (November 23, 2004)
Pages: 272 pages