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How to Stop Time: Heroin From A To Z download epub

by Ann Marlowe


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Ann Marlowe, who wrote "How to Stop Time: Heroin from A to Z", is one of those eighty percenters. And for some reason, she decided to write a memoir about addiction

Ann Marlowe, who wrote "How to Stop Time: Heroin from A to Z", is one of those eighty percenters. And for some reason, she decided to write a memoir about addiction. Let me start off by saying she wrote a very interesting and entertaining book. Marlowe had me laughing out loud at her convoluted, elaborate arguments about the true nature of heroin use and addiction, which reminded me that there are few absolutes in this life. We don't see the world as it really is, we see it as we are. Again, this was a fascinating, if not sometimes exhausting (she sent me to the dictionary a couple of times - valetudinarian?) read. But Marlowe's no expert on addiction and maybe she's not trying to be.

How to Stop Time book. How to Stop Time is an important contemporary contribution to the.

Finally, a book about heroin that isn't full of self-pity. com User, November 24, 1999. How to Stop Time is truly a lovely book: honest, well-written, funny and merciless.

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Like Ann Marlowe who in her memoir How to Stop Time: Heroin from A to Z tells how heroin addicts measure their days by both copping and doing their H, I divvy time by the arrival of my magazine subscriptions. The weeklies’ (The New Yorker and New York) arrival on Tuesdays marks the official start to the week; and while Harper’s announces the coming of the next month before I’m even thinking about it, The Believer usually punctuates the middle of the four-week ru. f magazines are an addiction, it’s one I relish with unadulterated pleasure, and one my.

Voices don't come any cooler - in the sense of hip as well as of remote, uningratiating - than the one Ann Marlowe writes with in "How to Stop Time: Heroin From A to . (The only uncool thing about the book is its gimmicky subtitle. Marlowe had a serious but controlled habit for seven years, from 1988 to 1995; she snorted rather than shooting up ("never more than a bag a day"), and she always kept her head securely screwed on.

Heroin, writes Ann Marlowe, is a stand-in, a stopgap, a mask for what we believe is missing. Like the ’objects’ seen by Plato’s man in a cave, dope is the shadow cast by cultural movements we can’t see directly

Heroin, writes Ann Marlowe, is a stand-in, a stopgap, a mask for what we believe is missing. Like the ’objects’ seen by Plato’s man in a cave, dope is the shadow cast by cultural movements we can’t see directly. Cultural criticism masquerading as a heroin memoir masquerading as a dictionary,how to stop timelooks at American society through the lens of heroin use. Weaving personal history (Marlowe used heroin for eight years) with aphorisms and analysis, Ann Marlowe is unsparing in her exploration of her, and society’s, obsession with heroin addiction.

How to Stop Time: Heroin from A to Z. by Ann Marlowe. Her book contains what is probably the least histrionic, least hysterical writing about heroin to be found outside medical literature. And on top of that it's engaging and it's smart. Craig Seligman, Salon. Not what is considered your typical consumer of the drug, Marlowe shed a somewhat different light on junkie culture, and now she has parlayed that into a book.

She contributes frequently to the op ed pages of the Wall Street Journal and New York Post, mainly writing about Afghanistan and the US counterinsurgency there. Upon the release of How to Stop Time, many praised its unsparing view of addiction as fundamentally a choice, but others charged that Marlowe could not have come to this conclusion if she were a "real addict" (IV user, poor, uneducated).

Brilliant, daring, and completely unique, "How to Stop Time" is the first book to examine the comforts of heroin in the context of our cynical, post-consumer society, and the first to explain the profound nostalgia that powers both addiction and our age. How to Stop Time: Herion from A-. . How to Stop Time: Herion from A-Z. Specifications. Memoir of a Heroin Addict.

”Heroin,” writes Ann Marlowe, ”is a stand-in, a stopgap, a mask for what we believe is missing. Like the 'objects' seen by Plato's man in a cave, dope is the shadow cast by cultural movements we can't see directly.”Cultural criticism masquerading as a heroin memoir masquerading as a dictionary, how to stop time looks at American society through the lens of heroin use. Weaving personal history (Marlowe used heroin for eight years) with aphorisms and analysis, Ann Marlowe is unsparing in her exploration of her, and society's, obsession with heroin addiction. There is no glamorization of 'heroin chic,' nothing about the irresistible power of the drug, no cliched scenes of degradation and ecstasy. There is much about craving the validation of danger, about suburban childhood, about the loss of a father to Parkinson's disease, about moving to the East Village, musicians' parties, being cool, and striving to remake yourself.how to stop time is the first book to examine heroin in relation to our cynical, post-consumer society, and the first to explain the profound nostalgia that powers both addiction and our age. ”That drive to return to the past,” Ann Marlowe writes, ”isn't an innocent one. It's about stopping your passage to the future. It is a symptom of the fear of death and the love of predictable experience.” Moral but not pious, this book sheds new light not just on nostalgia but on digital culture, consumerism, and glamour. In the annals of addiction literature it will take its place beside William S. Burroughs's Junkie, Jim Carroll's Basketball Diaries, and Thomas De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium Eater.

Comments: (7)

Brick my own
There's this law in economics called the 80/20 principle, or "Pareto's Law", named after Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto. The 80/20 principle asserts that a minority of causes, inputs, or effort usually leads to a majority of the results, outputs, or rewards. For example, eighty percent of what you achieve in your job comes from twenty percent of your time spent working. In business, you could say that twenty percent of products usually account for eighty percent of dollar sales value, or twenty percent of customers usually account for eighty percent of profits.

It goes on and on: twenty percent of motorists cause eighty percent of accidents, twenty percent of those who marry comprise eighty percent of divorce statistics, and twenty percent of criminals account for eighty percent of all crime. (You can read about this in the book, "The 80/20 Principle" by Richard Koch.)

The 80/20 principle applies to addiction as well. Twenty percent of the people who use drugs account for eighty percent of all problems in our society caused by drug use. So, if I may extrapolate here, I would say that twenty percent of all people who use drugs become addicted. That leaves a lot of people who use drugs who don't become addicts, just as probably eighty percent of people who drink don't become alcoholics.

Unfortunately, I'm one of those twenty percenters. If I could blame someone for all my relapses (I can't), I would blame those eighty percenters who seem to be able to use without any damaging consequences. If they can do it, why can't I?

Ann Marlowe, who wrote "How to Stop Time: Heroin from A to Z", is one of those eighty percenters. And for some reason, she decided to write a memoir about addiction. Let me start off by saying she wrote a very interesting and entertaining book. I couldn't put it down...the same way I can't look away from a car crash. But what you've got is, basically, like a social drinker trying to write about what it's like to be an alcoholic. She says that taking heroin is a habit that requires self-discipline. Really? She disputes William Burroughs' characterization of addiction as "uncontrollable need." Mr. Burroughs was only, like, the God of junkie-dom. She's even made a confounding case that the the reason junkies use is because they actually want to be addicted. Wow!

Marlowe had me laughing out loud at her convoluted, elaborate arguments about the true nature of heroin use and addiction, which reminded me that there are few absolutes in this life. We don't see the world as it really is, we see it as we are.

Again, this was a fascinating, if not sometimes exhausting (she sent me to the dictionary a couple of times - valetudinarian?) read. But Marlowe's no expert on addiction and maybe she's not trying to be. Maybe she just pushed my intellectual-inferiority-complex buttons one too many times. After all, she is a Jewish, Ivy league-educated woman from New York City and I'm just a white boy from Alabama biding my time in prison.

Written by David Allan Reeves
Author of "Running Away From Me"
Alsanadar
The alphabet format takes away from the potential power of the story. Should be gritty, tries to be literary, isn't either.
betelgeuze
great book
Diab
As a rule, I'm not all that interested in "the literature of addiction," but this book works as memoir, as cultural criticism, as philosophy. Or simply as a story -- of a remarkable woman's struggle with her demons and the demons of post-modern life. The dictionary format (which she seems to have chosen because, like heroin, it "stops time") doesn't keep you from getting wrapped up in the story. On the contrary -- like the similar device in Pavic's Dictionary of the Khazars -- it sets the story in a hall of mirrors, so that the implications stretch endlessly in all directions.
My only worry about the book is that Marlowe may be TOO remarkable -- that her obvious energy and strength of character make her an atypical addict, and throw doubt on her generalizations. But she claims that a lot of the other heroin addicts she knew were like her in many ways, and maybe she's right. Besides, I don't suppose de Quincey or Burroughs or Malcolm Lowry were "typical" addicts, either.
Ballazan
Heroin is a selfish drug and its users are boring people. Istill hold that view after reading this book. The more I learn aboutthe notion of being cool, the more I see ordinary people facing their day to day anxieties and overcoming them without resorting to drugs, as heroic, indeed, as super cool. I was keen to read the work as I have two adult children who have been users for over a decade. Although they have led fairly normal lives the financial and emotional costs have been considerable. One has Hepatitis C. As they injected I assume they were more cool than Ann Marlowe. But I was especially interested in the insights by Ms Marlowe regarding relationships - because the user's mind is constantly concerned with how long since they got on, when they're next going to get on, etc, etc they are not "there" with you. They are self-absorbed. I was also interested in the users attitude to money (Heroin habits are denominated in dollars not by mass or frequency), sex, home, glamour, dealers all of which are conveniently covered in alphabetical order. I'm convinced the most effective weapon against heroin is not draconion laws and all out war - which is clearly being lost, just as Prohibition was lost in the USA - but knowledge. Ann Marlowe's book is an intelligent and useful insight into the user's motivation, lifestyle, priorities and experience. It is well written and an absorbing and honest work.
lucky kitten
I am torn on this book, absolutely torn. Marlowe's writing style is wonderful. She is obviously very intelligent. The problem *I* have here is that what she went through almost doesn't sound real. As in, I am not saying that she made up the fact that she got high. But, as a former heroin addict, I almost think that she either a) is exaggerating how many times she did heroin or b) is lying when she says she hasn't touched it, hasn't even THOUGHT ABOUT IT for years. It just doesn't sound real. And yeah, I know that everyone has a different experience with heroin. But usually not THAT much different. And something that worries me about this book is that it will encourage people to try it. I wish it came with a disclaimer.
All that aside, I do think Marlowe's book is a decent piece of literature. Except for the fact that she rambles about things that are completely uninteresting and that have NOTHING to do with stopping time or doing heroin. And some of these anecdotes are really really really boring. Some of them are the kind of stories your grandmother tells you every time she sees you that weren't interesting or funny or lesson-filled the first time but you are forced to sit there and pretend that they are AND not say you've heard them thirty-seven times before.
Just an opinion though. I'd leaf through it in the bookstore to make sure you'll like it before you buy it.
How to Stop Time: Heroin From A To Z download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Ann Marlowe
ISBN: 0465031501
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Basic Books; 1 edition (September 9, 1999)
Pages: 304 pages