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Development and Decline of Beijing's Hui Muslim Community (Islam in Southeast Asia: Views from Within) download epub

by Zhou Chuanbin,Ma Xuefeng


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Islam has been practiced in Chinese society for 1,400 years. Muslims are a minority group in China, representing between . 5% to . 5% of the total population according to the latest estimates

Islam has been practiced in Chinese society for 1,400 years. 5% of the total population according to the latest estimates. Though Hui Muslims are the most numerous group, the greatest concentration of Muslims is in Xinjiang, with a significant Uyghur population. Lesser but significant populations reside in the regions of Ningxia, Gansu and Qinghai.

Zhou Chuanbin and Ma Xuefeng examine the traditional social structure and kinship network of urban Hui Muslims t Hui Muslims in China have lived with the Han Chinese for hundreds of years, maintaining their Islamic and cultural identity despite the powerful assimilation mechanisms o. .

Zhou Chuanbin and Ma Xuefeng examine the traditional social structure and kinship network of urban Hui Muslims t Hui Muslims in China have lived with the Han Chinese for hundreds of years, maintaining their Islamic and cultural identity despite the powerful assimilation mechanisms of Chinese society. Today, however, the urban Hui community is confronted with new pressures. Zhou Chuanbin and Ma Xuefeng examine the traditional social structure and kinship network of urban Hui Muslims that historically allowed them to defend ethnic and religious boundaries.

Zhou Chuanbin and Ma Xuefeng. ZHOU CHUANBIN is professor of ethnology in the Faculty of Politics and Law at Ningxia University, China. Hui Muslims in China have lived with the Han Chinese for hundreds of years, maintaining their Islamic and cultural identity despite the powerful assimilation mechanisms of Chinese society. This monograph examines the traditional social structure and kinship network of urban Hui Muslims that historically allowed them to defend ethnic and religious boundaries. from the University for Nationalities in Beijing.

Islam is the most widely practiced religion in Southeast Asia, numbering approximately 242 million adherents which translate to about 42% of the entire population, with majorities in Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia as well Pattani in Thailand and part.

Islam is the most widely practiced religion in Southeast Asia, numbering approximately 242 million adherents which translate to about 42% of the entire population, with majorities in Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia as well Pattani in Thailand and parts of Mindanao in the Philippines respectively. Significant minorities are located in the other Southeast Asian states.

Zhou Chuanbin and Ma Xuefeng examine the traditional social structure and kinship network of urban Hui Muslims .

Zhou Chuanbin and Ma Xuefeng examine the traditional social structure and kinship network of urban Hui Muslims that historically allowed them to defend ethnic and religious boundaries. They consider the social transitions and challenges caused by revolution, modernization, urbanization, and globalization that presently threaten the cultural survival of the Hui Muslim community in Beijing. 3. Description this book Hui Muslims in China have lived with the Han Chinese for hundreds of years, maintaining their Islamic and cultural identity despite the powerful assimilation mechanisms of Chinese society.

Islam is a major religion in Southeast Asia, with Indonesian Muslims comprising the largest Muslim population .

Islam is a major religion in Southeast Asia, with Indonesian Muslims comprising the largest Muslim population in the world. Events and developments since 11 September 2001 have added greater attention to Islam and its adherents in this part of the world. This general survey of Islam in Southeast Asia is intended to inform, explain and update readers about the more significant aspects of Islam in Southeast Asia, then and now.

Islam in Southeast Asia. Certainly one gains a more intimate view of the inner spirituality of Southeast Asian Muslims in such expressions. Asia is home of 65 percent of the world's Muslims, and Indonesia, in Southeast, is the world's most populous Muslim country. been invented by one Muslim saint to explain Islam in the local idiom), or the many popular verse tales of the exploits of an uncle of the Prophet, Amir Hamzah, drawn from Persian and Arabic originals. Even if such practices are regionally distinct or viewed askance elsewhere, if not contested openly, such practices are nonetheless seen as ways of connecting to a faith that is global and egalitarian.

Published 2009 by Asian Muslim Action Network, Silkworm Books in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Development and Decline of Beijing's Hui Muslim Community. Published 2009 by Asian Muslim Action Network, Silkworm Books in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Zhou Chuanbin and Ma Xuefeng examine the traditional social structure and kinship network of urban Hui Muslims that historically allowed them to.Ma Xuefeng is a lecturer on Hui Muslim society at Yunnan University, China. Zhou Chuanbin is professor of ethnology at Ningxia University, China.

Hui Muslims in China have lived with the Han Chinese for hundreds of years, maintaining their Islamic and cultural identity despite the powerful assimilation mechanisms of Chinese society. Today, however, the urban Hui community is confronted with new pressures. Zhou Chuanbin and Ma Xuefeng examine the traditional social structure and kinship network of urban Hui Muslims that historically allowed them to defend ethnic and religious boundaries. They consider the social transitions and challenges caused by revolution, modernization, urbanization, and globalization that presently threaten the cultural survival of the Hui Muslim community in Beijing.
Development and Decline of Beijing's Hui Muslim Community (Islam in Southeast Asia: Views from Within) download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Zhou Chuanbin,Ma Xuefeng
ISBN: 9749511034
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Silkworm Books (January 7, 2009)
Pages: 124 pages