Dead Meat download epub

by Sue Coe


Epub Book: 1707 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1980 kb.

Dead Meat will appeal not just to those interested in animal rights, but to anyone who cares about how society .

Dead Meat will appeal not just to those interested in animal rights, but to anyone who cares about how society functions. From Library Journal. Here Coe?a vegetarian?tackles the injustices found in the meat industry in a visual and textual update of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle?a culmination of six years of traveling around the country visiting meatpacking plants and slaughterhouses. Radical journalist Alexander Cockburn provides historical context in the introduction; but one wishes for some art historical context as well (Goya and Daumier come immediately to mind).

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Offers a critical view of the meat industry in scores of illustrations, documenting the skewing, flaying, dismembering. A nationally prominent, politically oriented artist offers an unsparingly critical view of the meat industry in scores of illustrations.

Showing 22 distinct works. Dead Meat by. Sue Coe, Alexander Cockburn (Essay).

Sue Coe grew up next to a slaughterhouse in Liverpool. She studied at the Royal College of Art in London and left for New York in 1972. Her previous books include Dead Meat (winner of the 1991 Genesis Award) and Cruel. Early in her career, she was featured in almost every issue of Art Spiegelman’s groundbreaking magazine Raw, and has since contributed illustrations to the New York Times, the New Yorker, The Nation, Entertainment Weekly, Time, Details, The Village Voice, Newsweek, Rolling Stone, Esquire and Mother Jones, among other publications.

Sue Coe is considered one of the foremost political artists working today She has since published illustrated books on Malcolm X (X, 1986), the meat industry (Dead Meat, 1996) and related animal rights subjects (Pit's Letter, 2000)

Sue Coe is considered one of the foremost political artists working today. Born in England in 1951, she moved to New York in the early 1970’s. followed, she was featured on the cover of Art News and in numerous museum collections and exhibitions, including a retrospective at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington. She has since published illustrated books on Malcolm X (X, 1986), the meat industry (Dead Meat, 1996) and related animal rights subjects (Pit's Letter, 2000). The Galerie St. Etienne provides a variety of services in connection with its representation of Sue Coe. Sue Coe frequently lectures, teaches and does workshops at colleges and universities.

Sue Coe (born 21 February 1951) is an English artist and illustrator working primarily in drawing, printmaking, and in the form of illustrated books and comics. Her work is in the tradition of social protest art and is highly political

Sue Coe (born 21 February 1951) is an English artist and illustrator working primarily in drawing, printmaking, and in the form of illustrated books and comics. Her work is in the tradition of social protest art and is highly political.

Home Browse Books Book details, Dead Meat. Armed with her sketchbook, Sue Coe traveled across the United States, following the path from factory farm to feedlot, to the "killing floor" of the slaughterhouse. By Sue Coe. No cover image. Her firsthand observations are rendered in her diaries and artwork - stunning, unforgettable images. Coe made eye contact with a frightened veal calf awaiting execution and talked to the people who commit the sanctioned killing that supplies our meat-eating culture.

Sue Coe. What others are saying. Happier meat is more expensive meat. It is expanding their business, not reducing it. "Happier meat is more expensive meat. It is expanding their business, not reducing i. Coe. Visit. Sue Coe. More information.

Offers a critical view of the meat industry in scores of illustrations, documenting the skewing, flaying, dismembering, castrating, debeaking, electrocuting, and decapitating of animals

Comments: (7)

Dianaghma
I first borrowed this book through interlibrary loan. When I had to return it, I purchased it from Amazon. The book is devastating. Every 2-3 pages, I had to put the book down as I was overwhelmed with empathy and blinded by tears. The art is hauntingly rendered, and the text is written in such a way that the reader is forced to come to his or her own moral conclusions. Details are given matter-of-factly with no emphasis on the author/artist's emotional reaction. None is needed: The facts are enough. Whatever naysayers might post, words like "sentimentality" and "demagogue" really have no place in the discussion or review of this book. Coe puts the images in front of you and lets you decide if the meat industry is one you want to support.

For the record and in response to the review by Afan of Sitagyl Manor, it does no good to compare the big biz animal industry to a humanely-run small farm. Also, it is not for humans to attempt to understand what animals might think or feel. It is, however, certain that animals are capable of feeling fear, and if you think they don't become frightened while watching the slaughter of their kind, seeing by the pattern that they are next in line, you have a very different understanding of animals than I have.
Light out of Fildon
I love Sue Coe! I'm not a vegan or an animal activist, but I appreciate her radicalism and her passion -- and the glimpses she provides of the world of slaughterhouses in America are riveting. I especially like her compassion for everyone involved -- not just the animals, but the workers, the owners, the farmers -- this is not a diatribe about 'bad' people and 'innocent' animals, it's a vivid portrait of an industry that reveals the violence and inhumanity generated by capitalist logics where only profit matters. It's also fascinating for letting us in on how an artist works -- the process from sketches and conversations to finished prints.
Flower
Full disclosure first, I was already interested in going vegetarian before purchasing this book. I don't really know how to review this book. The art is amazing, but disturbing. I think seeing the abuse in paint strokes doesn't lessen the impact. Instead Sue Coe has given the suffering animals a way to express fear and pain that doesn't always shine through in the chaos of a digital print. Don't buy if you're not interested in the plight of animals. Don't buy if you don't want to see the face of your turkey sub. Or maybe you're the one who needs this book most.
Nirn
This book was the reason I became a vegetarian.
While it's easy to skim lightly over even a well-presented and passionate text such as Peter Singer's "Animal Liberation" without understanding the true horror of the meat that you eat, you can't so easily dismiss this book's drawings. They are blunt truths: rather than appealing to your reason, they speak directly to your decency. That makes their argument impossible to ignore.
If you are a meat-eater, you should be afraid to read "Dead Meat," because it will force you to understand the horrible process that turns a life into the food on your plate. But don't let that fear stop you from reading it- you shouldn't fear the book, you should fear the facts that it presents but that tragically exist quite independently of it.
Keel
Some of the pictures in this book will stay with you for a long time, some may even make meat-eaters turn vegetarian. But, even more so than the pictures, the description of the horror of factory farms - to the animals and the workers - will disgust anyone with a heart.
I reccommend this book to longtime vegetarians, new vegetarians, and also to people who are just interested in maybe trying vegetarianism.
(...)
Kagda
This book comes from someone with an animal rights background and a background in the arts as well. The images are so well done,perfectly disturbing and the stories,truthful and profound. A great read for anyone that wants to know the truth behind the industry.
Zulurr
I received this book as a gift yesterday and stayed up all night reading it and finished it. Luckily, I did not have any nightmares about animals being treated in the way in which Sue Coe describes and paints in this revealing book. I recommend this book to the world; everyone should be aware of the way we treat animals, from pumping them with chemicals and slaughtering them with a knife as they hang from a back foot, to eating them on our dinner tables. The people of the world need to have this information so that they can consciously make a decision about how they can change their contibution regarding these crimes which occur on a daily, hourly, minute by minute basis in every part of the world.
i don't have it yet but i might be gettung it at christmas and it should be just as good as all the other slaughterhouse books i have1 Read it if you like knowing what takes place in slaughterhouses as much as me!
Dead Meat download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Sue Coe
ISBN: 1568580509
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Running Press; First Edition edition (March 24, 1996)
Pages: 224 pages