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Taking Heat: The President, the Press, and My Years in the White House download epub

by Ari Fleischer


Epub Book: 1280 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1861 kb.

One of the other objectives was to provide a critical narrative of the press and give insight into the White House Press Crops.

One of the other objectives was to provide a critical narrative of the press and give insight into the White House Press Crops. I found his look at the White House Press fascinating and he really does put you inside the room of the toughest reporters in the United States. He illustrates well his points about the adversarial nature of the press and the desire of the press to create conflict which leads to stories. Many times the same questions are asked over and over hoping for a slip that the Press Secretary cannot afford to give.

The White House press does not give passes to any president. People today do not trust the news they get from the press and rightly so due to the biases that are present be they Fox News or MSNBC. While he highlights the point of on the liberal media it is done far better by Benard Goldberg in his book Bias. Because I have always thought a press secretary has to be the strangest job in the white house, and because Ari Fleischer seemed the most sincere among the recent victims, I decided, out of curiousity, to read about his stint during the Bush presidency. It is almost painful to listen to a press briefing on cable television.

A former White House press secretary, Fleischer became a lightning rod for accusations about the Bush administration's alleged spin, secrecy and hostility to the press, claims that may not be quieted by this sunnily defensive memoir. Fleischer acknowledges the White House's fanatical "message discipline," which still seems in force in his glowing portrait of Bush as a decisive leader, stalwart in advancing freedom and opposing "evil," forever comforting the families of terror victims and military casualties

Taking Heat: The President, the Press, and My Years in the White House. This is the story of the men and women of the White House press corps and the cornerstones of democracy: freedom of speech and the freedom of the press

Taking Heat: The President, the Press, and My Years in the White House. The early years of the twenty-first century were a tumultuous time in America. This is the story of the men and women of the White House press corps and the cornerstones of democracy: freedom of speech and the freedom of the press. Fleischer presents an in-depth, insider's view on the Washington political arena from a perspective few have seen. Fleischer writes of his belief that the press has a bias in Washington. It's not a question of partisanship or press-driven ideology.

Taking Heat is an introspective exploration of the top political events in the first half of the Bush administration, as. .Fleischer served as press secretary for Senator Pete Domenici from 1989 to 1994 and later spent five years as spokesman for the House Ways and Means Committee

Taking Heat is an introspective exploration of the top political events in the first half of the Bush administration, as well as the candid observations of a professional who stood in the bright lights of the world stage. ನ್ನಷ್ಟು ಓದಿ. ಕುಗ್ಗಿಸಿ. Fleischer served as press secretary for Senator Pete Domenici from 1989 to 1994 and later spent five years as spokesman for the House Ways and Means Committee. Prior to joining the campaign of then Governor Bush in the fall of 1999, he served as communications director for Elizabeth Dole's presidential campaign.

Book Description For two and a half years, Ari Fleischer served as the official liaison between the White House and members of the press, acting as the voice of President George W. Bush and his administration, and was one of the President's most trusted advisers. He took the heat, fielded the questions, and brought the President's message into living rooms around the world.

During my two and a half years as the press secretary in the WhiteHouse, no day was tougher than September 14. The attack of September11 fell like a blow

Read an excerpt of this book. During my two and a half years as the press secretary in the WhiteHouse, no day was tougher than September 14. The attack of September11 fell like a blow. My day was consumed with reacting to it, wonderinghow it could have happened, and learning what we were going to do about it. The suffering was tremendous, but it was somehow distant.

Lawrence Ari Fleischer (born October 13, 1960) is an American media consultant and political aide who served as the twenty-first White House Press Secretary, for President George W. Bush, from January 2001 to July 2003. Today he works as a media consultant for the NFL, College Football Playoff, and other various sports organizations and players through his company, Ari Fleischer Communications. He was also an international media consultant to former Canadian prime minister, Stephen Harper.

Taking Heat' 'The President, the Press and My Years in the White House' By Ari Fleischer Illustrated. The current Bush administration has made no secret of its wariness of - and disdain for - the press. In a 2003 interview with Brit Hume of Fox News, the president said he glances at newspaper headlines "just to get kind of a flavor" but rarely reads the stories.

The early years of the twenty-first century were a tumultuous time in America. The country faced a hotly contested presidential election, the largest terrorist attack in the nation's history, and the early stages of war. Through it all, President George W. Bush surrounded himself with a handful of close advisers. During this time the man beside the President was Ari Fleischer, his press secretary and one of his most trusted confidants. In this role, Fleisher was present for every decision and became an eyewitness to history.

In this riveting account, Fleischer goes behind the scenes as he recalls his experiences in the West Wing. Through the ups and downs of this time, he took the heat, fielded the questions, and brought the President's message into living rooms around the world.

In Taking Heat, Fleischer, for the first time, gives his perspective on:

The 2000 election, from the recounts to the transition to powerSeptember 11, 2001, its aftermath, and the anthrax scareThe pressure-filled buildup to the war in Iraq and the President's thoughts as the war beganLife in the White House, from learning to adjust to the pace of the West Wing and his early briefings to his relationship with the pressThe White House press corps, who they are, and how they report the newsThe factors that led to his decision to leave Washington behind.

This is the story of the men and women of the White House press corps and the cornerstones of democracy: freedom of speech and the freedom of the press. Fleischer presents an in-depth, insider's view on the Washington political arena from a perspective few have seen.

Fleischer writes of his belief that the press has a bias in Washington. It's not a question of partisanship or press-driven ideology. Instead, it's a focus on conflict, particularly if it's a conflict they can attach to the President. It's the nature of the White House press corps, regardless of who's in power. The members of the White House press corps are masters at being devil's advocate, able to take with passion the opposite side of whatever issue the President supports. Fleischer's job was to calmly field their questions, no matter how pointed.

Taking Heat is an introspective exploration of the top political events in the first half of the Bush administration, as well as the candid observations of a professional who stood in the bright lights of the world stage.


Comments: (7)

krot
Ari provides an interesting book in his autobiography as President Bush's White House Press Secretary. I always hate to review books like this because they are so politically charged and ideologues on either side tend to get in a huff over what you say. I will endeavor to keep this as neutral as possible. This book sets out to accomplish many objectives but only hits half of them. First and foremost it is one of the best looks at the role of the press secretary and the sheer stress the job has on a person. Whether you like or hate President Bush there is no one who can deny that the role of press secretary is a hard job especially under a tight lipped and secretive white House. Andy Card's goal as chief of staff was to keep leaks to a minimum which frustrates the press leaving their only source of information the press secretary. When the press secretary is instructed not to discuss military matters it becomes even more adversarial. One of the interesting things learned from the book is what viewpoint the Press Secretary is supposed to have. I found it fascinating that he is only there to represent the views of the president and that does not necessarily have to be the wishes of the branches of government that report to the president.

One of the other objectives was to provide a critical narrative of the press and give insight into the White House Press Crops. I found his look at the White House Press fascinating and he really does put you inside the room of the toughest reporters in the United States. He illustrates well his points about the adversarial nature of the press and the desire of the press to create conflict which leads to stories. Many times the same questions are asked over and over hoping for a slip that the Press Secretary cannot afford to give. One of the angles that I think he does handle poorly is the bias of the press. While there are voluminous studies to show that the press is slanted right Ari seems to not acknowledge that all media is biased in one direction or another. The White House press does not give passes to any president. People today do not trust the news they get from the press and rightly so due to the biases that are present be they Fox News or MSNBC. While he highlights the point of on the liberal media it is done far better by Benard Goldberg in his book Bias.

Finally Ari tries to make a defense of President Bush and his policies/leadership style. Some of his book seems to be aimed at knocking down the arguments in the Price of Loyalty. While this is another viewpoint again the truth probably lies in the middle. Some of his defenses of trying to shift blame to the press for starting up the Iraq war are fairly ludicrous. Ari does not sit in on any of the national security briefings and the president preferred himself to comment on those matters leaving Ari in a hard position to comment on them after the fact. One of the things he does refute well that many agree with is the loyalty that Bush shows to those who are loyal to him. There is a clear look that Bush's leadership style does work within his White House and he is respected by the staff. Ari also seems to take it upon himself to set the record straight and show the country that Bush did not think of the war in Iraq in a vacuum that many other people including the press also had the same idea along the way. He is largely successful in this although he glosses over one of the critical mistakes. The landing on the USS Lincoln with the banner Mission Accomplished was one of the great errors in the press of fighting the war and it is skipped over here. I think Ari is right in saying that the press views any war that is long as a quagmire and Vietnam and any war where we win quickly is Desert Storm and must be over in a week. There is a lack of reality by the press which filters to the country.

Overall an excellent book and very well done. Ari provides unique insight into the Bush White House and while it is biased it does not make it useless. He raises critical questions that require issues to be reexamined and while he is loathe to critize his former boss for the things he did wrong we still see a good look at Bush the man and the President.
Kagalkree
Because I have always thought a press secretary has to be the strangest job in the white house, and because Ari Fleischer seemed the most sincere among the recent victims, I decided, out of curiousity, to read about his stint during the Bush presidency.

It is almost painful to listen to a press briefing on cable television. How can the press secretary who is not a cabinet member, who is privy only to information the administration wants him/her to hear, possibly convey the exact meaning to the sometimes ridiculous questions as to what the President knows or thinks - really. All they can do is try not to give their own opinions and start a firestorm.

I enjoyed this book because Ari Fleischer comes across as sincere. He describes his trips all over the world, meetings with foreign leaders, the aftermath of 9/11, events leading up to the Iraq war, engaging with the press until he simply "burned out" and had to resign. No wonder, a press secretary is on call 24/7 as news is being made all the time.

The author has no axe to grind, no grand desire to diminish George Bush, and states he took a lot of heat and hopes he has shed some light. He feels the press can be too conflict-oriented most of the time, and I agree. Here is one press secretary who did his best during a tumultuous time in American history to interpret the news from the White House to the American people in a calm manner. A thankless task indeed. Forget party labels, just enjoy this book.
Tane
Getting a look behind the scenes from one of the top media relations professionals in the country is a real treat. Fleischer's experience in dealing with a high-profile supervisor (President Bush) on one side and some of the most aggressive and sometimes partisan press on the other is a great read.
Benn
When I found this book (on CD) in the sale rack I thought maybe I'd found a rare jewel. Figuring the early Bush years were old news and this book was sent to the sale rack been because of that.

First off Ari should have never read his own book. He came off as a real complainer. A man who had written a book to continue to make excuses for his decisions. Notice I didn't say mistakes. He rarely stated a move of his without showing us how he was forced to do so. It was very sad. Even at one point the old Clinton administration pushes him around.

The few moments he gives us of true inside action where wonderful. There may have only been three in the whole book. The Colin Powell condom story was one of them. Ari that's what the reader wanted in the book.

What scared me was that Ari came off as extremely angry at the press. There is one woman reporter who he mocks endlessly in his vocal impersonation of her. I hope she doesn't hear the CD version or she is going to be super mad. Ari spends a very long chapter expaining how the press is unfair and bias. He uses graduation numbers instead of true stories. We all saw the press eat Bill Clinton alive...so it was hard to believe they were nicer to Bill then they were to George. That chapter should have met the shreader.

Ari did show some spots of careless reporting but his use of "you should have believed the White House" was a weak response. After past White House administrations trying to "out sly" the press Ari should have known the press would not simply take him at his word. He came off sounding like a naive high school student.

Several of the world stituations that happened while Ari was in office where handled with amazing skill in real life but Ari made it sound like he was rolled over. The moment where Bush took the megaphone in NYC was the most powerful moment in his presidency. Luckily I saw it because Ari barely mentioned it.

Ari ducked and dodged the press for years. He's mad that he did it. He's still mad at them. The amazing strategies the Bush administration used to keep the American people informed are not mentioned in this book. I wanted to learn something. Instead I see Ari scolding a press member for a inaccurate story that hurt the White House then giving the same guy a hot breaking story in the next breath by accident AND letting the guy run it. What was his reasoning? It sounded weak and also like bad management.

Was Ari out of his league? The book makes it appear so. Luckily I watch all this on television as an American citizen. I know the book paints the wrong picture. To the public Ari did a stand up job and he worked well to keep the American people informed. So next time you write a book Ari stick to your guns and be proud of what you did. It would make for a much better read.
Taking Heat: The President, the Press, and My Years in the White House download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Ari Fleischer
ISBN: 0060747625
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: William Morrow; First Edition edition (March 1, 2005)
Pages: 400 pages