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Imagine There's No Country: Poverty, Inequality, and Growth in the Era of Globalization download epub

by Surjit Bhalla


Epub Book: 1727 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1182 kb.

Bhalla, Surjit S. Publication date.

New results, presented in Imagine there’s no country: Poverty, inequality and Growth in the era of Globalization go a long way in addressing these issues, and find that growth has, indeed, been resoundingly pro-poor during the 1980s and 1990s. The distribution of benefits from growth between countries raises the issue of individuals versus countries. Whether growth – on a regional or global level – has been pro-poor or not depends on whether it has disproportionately (and positively) impacted poor individuals; this matters more than the country of origin of these individuals.

A new era of globalization, which began in the 1980s, brought about a significant decline in. .

A new era of globalization, which began in the 1980s, brought about a significant decline in costs of transportation, communication, and production; considerably improved intercountry competitiveness; and broke down trade and cultural barriers among countries. View Sharing Options. Bhalla rubbishes poverty estimates made by the World Bank and the Indian government to come up with dramatic findings that could shake up global development policy. Sandipan Deb, Outlook Magazine. A brilliant new book.

A new era of globalization, which began in the 1980s, brought about a. The concept of a sovereign nation has been increasingly questioned in recent years. Some, indeed, have imagined a world without boundaries, without countries. Has poverty declined at a faster pace during globalization? If yes, why? If not, is it because the growth rate was lower, or because inequality worsened, or both? Who gained from globalization? Was it the elite in both the developed and developing world?

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Imagine There's No Country: Poverty, Inequality, and Growth in the Era of Globalization," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 348, September. Handle: RePEc:iie:ppress:348. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

NOTWITHSTANDING Joe Stiglitz’s tenure as Chief Economist of the World Bank, few would accuse the Bank of aiding and abetting the antiglobaliza-tion movement.

Imagine There's No Country: Poverty, Inequality, and Growth in the Era of Globalization. Imagine There's No Country: Poverty, Inequality, and Growth in the Era of Globalization. On the World Bank's criterion, poverty has dropped decade by decade from 56 percent of the population of developing countries in 1950 to 9 percent in 2000.No Country : Poverty, Inequality, and Growth in the Era of Globalization.

book by Surjit Bhalla. Imagine There's No Country : Poverty, Inequality, and Growth in the Era of Globalization. Select Format: Paperback.

A new era of globalization, which began in the 1980s, brought about a significant decline in costs of transportation, communication, and production; considerably improved intercountry competitiveness; and broke down trade and cultural barriers among countries. The concept of a sovereign nation has been increasingly questioned in recent years. Some, indeed, have imagined a world without boundaries, without countries. Others who doubt the benefits of globalization have called for increased protectionism and greater regulation of economic activity. Has globalization made the world grow faster? Has poverty declined at a faster pace during globalization? If yes, why? If not, is it because the growth rate was lower, or because inequality worsened, or both? Who gained from globalization? Was it the elite in both the developed and developing world? What about the middle class? Who are they? How did they benefit from (or lose to) the forces of globalization?This comprehensive study firmly debunks several popular myths such as the belief that globalization has resulted in lower overall growth rates for poor countries, increasing world inequality, and stagnating poverty levels. Through rigorous, integrated methodologies and an enhanced dataset, the author, Surjit Bhalla, answers some of the most pressing policy issues confronting us today.

Comments: (2)

generation of new
Bhalla wants to fight. He claims that globalization - far from being the bugaboo imagined by the WTO protestors - has led to a world where incomes are becoming more equally distributed. The conventional wisdom that incomes are diverging rapidly is, Bhalla claims, based on bad numbers and bad number crunching. When the right numbers are crunched properly - here Bhalla says in effect "trust me, I am the only person who knows how to do this right" - we find that incomes are in fact becoming more equally distributed across the world's citizens.
More specifically, Bhalla makes the following points: (1) Income inequality is declining across nations (in large part because of rapid income growth in poor populous nations such as China and India in East and South Asia). (2) Income inequality is rising in many nations. (3) Because inequality across nations is the larger component of total world income inequality, total inequality is declining despite the rise in inequality in the average nation.
Unless you have time to spare, however, I recommend you read The New Geography of Global Income Inequality instead of this book. It's more expensive than the Bhalla book, but it's also a much better book - more focused, better organized, more convincing, and more theoretically informed. In fact, if not for the price of The New Geography, I would recommend it for college courses in globalization and economic development. I would not recommend Bhalla's book for undergraduates. In addition to The New Geography, I also recommend the September 2002 article in the American Economic Review by Bourguignon and Morrisson, "Inequality among world citizens, 1820-1992."
MarF
Surjit S Bhalla is shameless in propagating lies with numbers.
Look at his past articles from IE times, filled with Modi worship, and fudging analysis with shameless dishonesty.
Imagine There's No Country: Poverty, Inequality, and Growth in the Era of Globalization download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Surjit Bhalla
ISBN: 0881323489
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Peterson Institute for International Economics (September 24, 2002)
Pages: 288 pages