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Race Work: The Rise of Civil Rights in the Urban West (Race and Ethnicity in the American West) download epub

by Matthew C. Whitaker


Epub Book: 1790 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1112 kb.

Race Work fills a much needed void on the topic of civil rights in the American West. Whitaker cannot discuss every aspect of civil rights and race relations in Arizona during the late twentieth century, but his book is an excellent place to start.

Race Work fills a much needed void on the topic of civil rights in the American West. Dr. Whitaker has written a very readable and insightful book on this topic. Arizona has been overlooked for its trailblazing in the areas of school desegregation, and integration of housing and public facilities. This book is a tribute to Dr. Lincoln Ragsdale, and his wife Eleanor.

Race Work tells the story of this remarkable pair, two of the most influential black activists of the post-World War II American West, and through their story, supplies a missing chapter in the history of the civil rights movement, American race relations, African Americans, and th. .

Race Work tells the story of this remarkable pair, two of the most influential black activists of the post-World War II American West, and through their story, supplies a missing chapter in the history of the civil rights movement, American race relations, African Americans, and the American West. Matthew C. Whitaker explores the Ragsdales' family history and how their familial traditions of entrepreneurship, professionalism, activism, and "race work" helped form their activist identity and placed them in a position to help desegregate Phoenix.

Race Work is first and foremost an interesting dual biography of Lincoln and Eleanor Ragsdale, two leaders of the black civil rights movement in Phoenix after World War II. It is also an ambitious effort to analyze "the rise of civil rights in the urban West," using Phoenix as a case study. Although the two halves. do not always hold together, the book as a whole does give the reader quite useful information with which to place Phoenix into the broader story of the civil rights movement in the West and Southwest. The portrait of the Ragsdales is fascinating

Race Work tells the story of this remarkable pair, two of the most influential black activists of the post-World War II American West, and through their story, supplies a missing chapter.

Race Work tells the story of this remarkable pair, two of the most influential black activists of the post-World War II American West, and through their story, supplies a missing chapter. ISBN13:9780803260276.

Introduction: african americans, police brutality, and the . criminal justice system.

Matthew C. Whitaker, Race Work: The Rise of Civil Rights in the Urban West. Introduction: african americans, police brutality, and the . Introduction: Hip Hop in History: Past, Present, and Future. Alridge et al. The Negro Migration to Canada after the Passing of the Fugitive Slave Act. Landon.

Publishes books and journals especially in American history, the American West, and Native American studies. The Rise of Civil Rights in the Urban West. The Line Which Separates

Publishes books and journals especially in American history, the American West, and Native American studies. The Line Which Separates. Imagining the African American West.

He is the author of several books, including Race Work: The Rise of Civil Rights in the Urban West (Nebraska 2007) and African American Icons of Sports: Triumph, Courage, and Excellence. Contributors: Mitchell F. Crusto, Bryan K. Fair, Ruth Gordon, Linda S. Greene, D. Marvin Jones, Phyllis W. Kotey, Jeremy I. Levitt, Kenneth B. Nunn, Charles R. P. Pouncy, Alyssa G. Robillard, Andre L. Smith, Carlton Waterhouse, and Matthew C. Whitaker. Social Science, Disasters & Disaster Relief. Social Science, Ethnic Studies, African American Studies. Social Science, Sociology, Urban.

This book has stressed the importance of race, class and gender but also ethnicity, religion and local circumstances

Race in the American South: From Slavery to Civil Rights. On the eve of American intervention in the First World War, the South seemed to be a land suspended in time. This book has stressed the importance of race, class and gender but also ethnicity, religion and local circumstances. The balance of these forces has varied at different times and in different places. Race was hesitant and uncertain in the colonial period.

Of course that was only part of the driving force.

Nearly sixty years ago, Lincoln and Eleanor Ragsdale descended upon the isolated, somewhat desolate, and entirely segregated city of Phoenix, Arizona, in search of freedom and opportunity—a move that would ultimately transform an entire city and, arguably, the nation. Race Work tells the story of this remarkable pair, two of the most influential black activists of the post–World War II American West, and through their story, supplies a missing chapter in the history of the civil rights movement, American race relations, African Americans, and the American West. Matthew C. Whitaker explores the Ragsdales’ family history and how their familial traditions of entrepreneurship, professionalism, activism, and “race work” helped form their activist identity and placed them in a position to help desegregate Phoenix. His work, the first sustained account of white supremacy and black resistance in Phoenix, also uses the lives of the Ragsdales to examine themes of domination, resistance, interracial coalition building, race, gender, and place against the backdrop of the civil rights and post–civil rights eras. An absorbing biography that provides insight into African Americans’ quest for freedom, Race Work reveals the lives of the Ragsdales as powerful symbols of black leadership who illuminate the problems and progress in African American history, American Western history, and American history during the post–World War II era.

Comments: (4)

Unereel
Excellent. Dr. Whitaker was an inspiration during my academic years. I would highly recommend this book.
Ann
Race Work fills a much needed void on the topic of civil rights in the American West. Dr. Whitaker has written a very readable and insightful book on this topic. Arizona has been overlooked for its trailblazing in the areas of school desegregation, and integration of housing and public facilities. This book is a tribute to Dr. Lincoln Ragsdale, and his wife Eleanor. This is a must read for anyone interested in civil rights, historical perspectives of the American West, and biographies.
Ishnllador
In Whitaker's heavily researched and well-documented study of the struggle for African American equality and rights in Phoenix, he proves without a doubt that racial discrimination was not confined to the South and some Northern cities during the latter half of the twentieth century as is commonly believed, but thrived in the West as well.

However, Whitaker's study does not focus on activist groups or civil rights legislation as one might expect. Instead he looks at the "race work" of the Ragsdales, a wealthy and influential black Phoenician couple who had achieved their career goals against all odds and through their own perseverance. Whitaker chronicles their rise to prominence, but more importantly, examines their contributions to their community and to the civil rights movement, as well as the influence and knowledge they imparted on colleagues and activists.

Their personal experiences along with that of other black Phoenicians provide compelling, but disturbing evidence of racial discrimination in Phoenix from the 1940s through the 1990s in areas such as housing, employment, and public accommodations. Whitaker also includes some discussion of the controversial MLK Holiday issue that earned Arizona the reputation as a racist state during the late '80s and early '90s (as a Californian, I know that Arizona continues to have this reputation in the minds of many people here today).

Dr. Whitaker's book not only helps to fill a gap in the literature on the Western civil rights movements, it also expands the discussion of civil rights from the activists and ministers to other members of the black (and sometimes Hispanic and Jewish) communities who generally do not get recognized for the efforts.

Whitaker cannot discuss every aspect of civil rights and race relations in Arizona during the late twentieth century, but his book is an excellent place to start. Hopefully "Race Work" will encourage more scholars to research this relatively unexplored area of inquiry and expand on the issues Whitaker brings up. Perhaps even more significantly, "Race Work," if read widely, also has the potential to cause many Arizonans, and Americans in general, to re-examine their own attitudes and feelings about race, if they have even examined them at all.
Makaitist
Scholars are finally beginning to recognize that African American history, the history of the civil rights movement, and the intersection of race, class and gender in U.S. history, can be examined in areas west of the Mississippi River! Whitaker's work is the latest in a growing body of literature in this area. His book is original, well-researched, and readible. More importantly, it truly offers readers a dramatic and colorful history of African Americans and "race work" in the American west...a region still ripe for further study.
Race Work: The Rise of Civil Rights in the Urban West (Race and Ethnicity in the American West) download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Matthew C. Whitaker
ISBN: 080326027X
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (September 1, 2007)
Pages: 416 pages