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Lift Every Voice: Turning a Civil Rights Setback Into a New Vision of Social Justice download epub

by Lani Guinier


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Now, in Lift Every Voice, Professor Guinier explains the principles underlying those writings in layman's terms and offers her . Bill Clinton nominated Lani Guinier to the post of Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights in 1993.

Now, in Lift Every Voice, Professor Guinier explains the principles underlying those writings in layman's terms and offers her personal perspective on what happened in the spring and summer of 1993, taking us behind the scenes to meetings with Clinton, Attorney General Janet Reno, and other Washington officials. But perhaps more importantly, she writes about how, after she was cut loose by an intimidated White House, she regained her confidence in the civil rights movement.

Now, in Lift Every Voice, Professor Guinier explains the principles underlying those writings in layman's terms and offers her .

Lift Every Voice book. The result was a civil rights setback of monumental proportions

Lift Every Voice book. The result was a civil rights setback of monumental proportions. Senate, and an insightful look at the past, present, and future of civil rights in America, Lani Guinier at last breaks her silence.

Guinier, Lani, Clinton, Bill, 1946-, African American women civil rights workers, Civil rights workers, Civil rights movements. New York : Simon & Schuster. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Guinier, recently appointed Harvard Law School's first tenured black female professor, insists in this .

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Voice : Turning a Civil Rights Setback into a New Vision of Social . lani guinier's story marks the beginning of the awful, underhanded politics of smear that have only gotten worse in recent years.

When Bill Clinton nominated University of Pennsylvania Law School Professor Lani Guinier to the position of Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights in 1993, sh. .Lift Every Voice : Turning a Civil Rights Setback into a New Vision of Social Justice. she is wise and resilient. it's a reminder that we all have to stay engaged to rescue the American process, no matter what the mudslinging. Visionary, Hopeful, Stragetic: Mandatory Reading.

In 1993, shortly after his inauguration, new President Bill Clinton nominated his old friend and classmate Lani Guinier to the prestigious and crucial post of Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights

Lift every voice : turning a civil rights setback into a strong new vision of social justice. In 1993, shortly after his inauguration, new President Bill Clinton nominated his old friend and classmate Lani Guinier to the prestigious and crucial post of Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights. In the face of concerted opposition - what one friend of Guinier's called "a low-tech lynching" - Clinton backed down, not only withdrawing her nomination, but having refused throughout to give her an opportunity to speak out in her own defense (and his).

Lani Guinier (born April 19, 1950) is an American civil rights theorist. Bibliographic Details. Title: Lift Every Voice; Turning a Civil Rights. Publisher: Simon & Schuster, New York. She is the Bennett Boskey Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the first woman of color appointed to a tenured professorship there. Guinier's work includes professional responsibilities of public lawyers, the relationship between democracy and the law, the role of race and gender in the political process, college admissions, and affirmative action. Guinier is probably best known as President Bill Clinton's nominee for Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights in April 1993.

Lift Every Voice: Turning a Civil Rights Setback into a New Vision of Social Justice. It was a devastating attack on Ms. Guinier and on Norma Cantu, nominated to be assistant secretary for civil rights in the Department of Education. It began over dinner. Clinton’s Quota Queens, the headline said. It could have been the work of the savagely effective headline-writers at The Sun, Rupert Murdoch’s British tabloid. The label quota queen stuck to Professor Guinier, although the facts belied the implication that she was a great advocate of racial quotas.

turning a civil rights setback into a strong new vision of social justice. Published 1998 by Simon & Schuster in New York import new book. Created by an anonymous user. Initial record created, from Scriblio MARC record. Published 1998 by Simon & Schuster in New York.

The former nominee for assistant attorney general for civil rights discusses, for the first time, how President Clinton abandoned his ambitious civil rights agenda when the political right attacked her nomination, and how the civil rights movement has subsequently suffered. 50,000 first printing. Tour.

Comments: (7)

Doriel
Powerful and Inspirational
CopamHuk
well written
lacki
Great read, overall interesting story.
Sha
This book is an fine discourse on what America has - or should have - learned about the search for social justice in the quarter century since the Civil Rights marches of the 1960s. Lani Guinier is best known for her ill-fated candidacy to become the first African American and female Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights. She provides a spell-binding blow by blow account of what it was like to be nominated, then cast aside in the political jockeying that followed the 1992 election of Bill Clinton to the presidency. It is a poignant tale of how ordinary people on the fringes of her battle to get a hearing in Congress stepped in to insure that she never lost her sense of professionalism, her commitment to the truth, or her right to be treated with dignity. Her ideas on reforming voting procedures, the very ones that foiled her nomination in Congress, are well worth reading, and clearly worth implementing in an age of voter apathy and political gerymandering. The theme is broader, however, and in this book she demonstrates how thoroughly she has paid her dues over the years laboring for justice in America. As a civil rights lawyer in the 70s and 80s she went back to Alabama, Mississippi, Texas and other southern states to pick up where the civil rights movement of the 60s left off. Her talent for getting people to listen to the messages embodied in unfamiliar language and cultural expression is a gift to us all. Her story is full of important new insights into the nature of cross-cultural communication. She proclaims from her own experiences a critical need for wide-open discussion of social issues. Lawyers, she asserts, cannot win civil rights cases without the active participation of the public, and she calls for a return to grass-roots activism as a means to achieving social justice. Guinier is superbly analytical, a true listener, and a fine writer.
NiceOne
Professor Guinier has seen beyond the veil which seems to have fallen over the civil rights movement for the past thirty years. Guinier uses the story of her dis-appointment (her phrase) by the Clinton Administration to expose the inner workings of the political system and clarify her views. In so doing, she lays out a strategy that is simple, obvious, and doable. While so many "leaders" have been busy listening to one another, Guinier has been able to hear a still, small, powerful voice. This book is a must read for anyone who cares about democracy.
Androwyn
Bill Clinton nominated Lani Guinier to the post of Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights in 1993. The move generated a media firestorm and Clinton left Guinier to twist, twist slowly in the wind, only to cut her down before she could face hearings by the Senate Judiciary Committee. This was a bitter disappointment for Guinier, and it makes her a marked contrast to 1997's Black Female Ivy League Lawyer of the moment, Anita Hill, whose memoir, Speaking Truth to Power, chronicled her Senate Confirmation saga. Her hope was to stop Clarence Thomas' nomination with behind-the-scenes revelations. Hill saw her appearance before the Senate as a failure. Guinier on her part, wanted desperately to appear before the Senate. Lift Every Voice is, in some senses a companion to her Tyranny of the Majority -- a collection of the law journal writings that got her into trouble. In the early 90s her work may not have been "mainstream." It is now, and she is mandatory reading for students of the civil rights movement.
Lift Every Voice is divided into three parts. The book begins with her "Trials" a first-person account of the indignities she suffered during the confirmation process, her betrayal by the White House, and testimonials to the loyal friends and admirers who stood by her. Guinier may not be a Grisham or Drury, but her accounts of maneuvers, meetings, deceits, and betrayals makes for a good read. But there is still a core mystery. It almost seems that Clinton, from the beginning, fed Guinier to the wolves. Guinier falls back, maybe too often, in recounting this tale on the device of comparing herself to Alice in Wonderland. This saves her from having to state what seems inescapable: Clinton set her up.
The second section, subtitled "Bridges" relies on her history as a litigator to work on "storytelling" -- a favored methodology among critical race theorists. One of the points of her stories is the notion of developing a "communal 'we' who ! [seek] to gain power by harnessing their individual voting right to a community agenda." This communal consciousness is a key ingredient in Guinier's ideology of race consciousness, hostility to "color blind" policies, and her justification for affirmative action.
Another point of her stories is role definition for lawyers in the civil rights movement. Like Lenin, who had to somehow justify a member of the Russian minor nobility at the helm of the Russian Social Democratic Party, Guinier needs to square a circle and find a comfortable way to incorporate herself, and some of her middle-class origin friends like Penda Hair and Pam Karlan, into a movement for the politically dispossessed. Guinier's solution is to use the term "Bridge People" -- shepherds of the disenfranchised -- analogous to Lenin's crisper concept "Vanguard of the Proletariat." Like Lenin too, she takes plenty of time to excoriate agents of the bourgeoisie, such as bridge-sapper Tim Humphries, an Arkansas assistant attorney general. Guinier scorches Humphries, whose delta-drawl, John Denver looks, and country-slicker cunning simply outwitted and outmaneuvered Guinier. She seems still cross from her defeat at the hands of a Southern, white, male, non ivy-leaguer. Guinier even takes Humphries to task for making her come to New Orleans for a deposition at Mardi Gras, as though this golden opportunity were some sort of sinister imposition.
The third part of Lift Every Voice is entitled "Hearings" and it, too, has two major themes. The first is an exposition of her view of democracy and election systems. It is clear that Guinier, like some blacks, and all intellectuals in the movement, feels that the American electoral system totally deprives losers of representation. She sees all districting as gerrymandering. Her cure is proportional representation, which promises, she claims, more representation for minorities and higher levels of turnout as a bonus. She argues that ! the U.S. should follow the lead of South Africa in adopting PR.
The reintroduction of PR to France has provided an electoral superhighway for the racist National Front, and PR-using Switzerland has low turnout like the U.S. No panacea, PR is just high-tech gerrymandering, which manipulates not only district borders, but also the number of seats per district, the role of parties, and the votes-to-seats formula. So, PR can fine tune results with more predictability than mere boundary fiddling U.S. style. That is why her favorite gerrymandering tool is cumulative voting with small district magnitudes. This will, given U.S. demographics, greatly favor blacks at the expense of the more dispersed Hispanics. Cumulative voting, which she calls semi-proportional, operates like any electoral system, even single-member districts. All favor large, geographically concentrated minorities when the number of seats is small. Guinier's nostalgia for Illinois' 3-member districts would not help Hispanics as much as blacks.
Guinier's final call is for a national conversation on race. To some extent she has gotten her way, but certainly not the way she wanted it. In her law journal writings Guinier tended to use footnotes the way a squid uses ink. But in this testament, disciplined by the constraints of having to nuance her thoughts directly in the text, Guinier rises above lawyering and achieves a level of political theorizing devoid of small print. Consequently it is easy for any reader to have more faith in Guinier's seven talking-point agenda for a national conversation than in the Clinton administration's exclusivity-marred, politically correct and unsuccessful, attempts to engage the nation in such a discussion. Guinier wants, in point six of her agenda to involve "both the so-called victims and the presumed beneficiaries of racism." What this means is that she will have to be willing to talk to Tim Humphries. I can't wait.
INvait
Prof. Guinier has sounded a call to all concerned Americans, not just African-Americans, to be alert and aware of the continued injustices being being imposed upon the "silent minority".
Our AAABC (African-American Authors Book Club) group chose this book to review for our May session. Everyone in attendance agreed this was a most timely and informative expose on the true climate of civil rights today. Prof. Guinier helped us to understand some of the "behind closed doors" politics that go on every day. She further enlightens us on the provocative slants the media can put on issues in order to further hidden agendas.
We thought, during the time of her nominaton, that she was not being treated the same as the other candidates, but, we never really understood why nor did we understand what was really happening. Now we DO know and understand. Now we also realize that we should never again stand by without making our voices heard when we see this type of injustice happen. (We know it will happen again.)
Thanks Lani, for telling your story (our story), as a woman with an issue and "not a grievance".
Lift Every Voice: Turning a Civil Rights Setback Into a New Vision of Social Justice download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Lani Guinier
ISBN: 0684811456
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; 1st Edition edition (April 7, 1998)
Pages: 336 pages