» » Ultra Goes to War

Ultra Goes to War download epub

by Ronald Lewin


Epub Book: 1380 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1990 kb.

Given that the book is thirty years old and that newer books covering the Enigma cipher and the Ultra secret . 3. I have read a number of the more recent books concerning the Ultra secret but I have still learned new things from this book.

Given that the book is thirty years old and that newer books covering the Enigma cipher and the Ultra secret have been published, one can reasonably ask why they should invest time on this book. I think that this book is useful because: 1. It is the classic source that many other books reference 2. Being written 25 years after the end of the war, the author had a very important perspective and was allowed to interview many of the participants. Twenty five to forty years is, in my opinion, the best time frame to write a history of any event.

Ultra Goes to War: the Secret Story (London: Book Club Associates, 1978). A Signal-Intelligence War'. In Walter Laquer (e., The Second World War (London and Beveriy Hills, Calif. Lockhart, R. H. Bruce

Ultra Goes to War: the Secret Story (London: Book Club Associates, 1978). Bruce. Memoirs of a British Agent (New York: Putnam's, 1932). The Champagne Spy (London: Valentine Mitchell, 1972). MacDonald, Callum A. 'The Venio Affair'.

Start by marking Ultra Goes To War The Secret Story as Want to Read .

Start by marking Ultra Goes To War The Secret Story as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Ultra Goes to War book. Ronald Lewin (1914-1984) was field artillery officer with the Eighth Army. He made a successful post-war career in the upper echelons of the BBC before leaving to devote himself to military history

Ultra Goes to War book. The battle is the pay-off  . He made a successful post-war career in the upper echelons of the BBC before leaving to devote himself to military history. He is the author of several books on World War II including Rommel as Military Commander, Churchill as Warlord and Hitler’s Mistakes. Endeavour Press is the UK's leading independent digital publisher.

Ultra - the most effective system for reading the enemy's mind ever used in the war - was one of the world's best-kept secrets for thirty years

Ultra - the most effective system for reading the enemy's mind ever used in the war - was one of the world's best-kept secrets for thirty years. The Germans believed the high-level signals transmitted on their complex Enigma machine were invulnerable. But they were broken by Station X at Bletchley Park.

Ultra Goes to War. The Secret Story. Descripton: From the publisher: Ultra was the code name for the war-winning secret that did not emerge for 30 years. By Lewin, Ronald 2001, Penguin Books ISBN 0141390425 Paperback, 416 pages.

George Ronald Lewin CBE (11 October 1914 – 6 January 1984), later known as Ronald Lewin, was a British officer .

Lewin, (George) Ronald". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online e. Oxford University Press.

Ultra - the code word for the greatest secret of World War II - was the method by which the Allies intercepted German radio transmissions and broke their coded contents. But how was this information transmitted to the battlefield? Author Ronald Lewin was the first historian to utilize actual Ultra intercepts to show how this information was used in combat.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Ultra - the code word for the greatest secret of World War II - was the method by which the Allies intercepted . Author Ronald Lewin was the first historian to utilize actual Ultra intercepts to show how this information was used in combat.

The story of history's greatest spy operation during the Second World War. The Germans throughout the war thought their machine encrypted orders and messages were unreadable. But in England, a small group of dedicated men and women and broken the German "Enigma" coding system. The book includes newly released material, including Ultra intercepts, that provides new insights into some of World War Two's greatest battles and their outcomes. An extraordinary addition to military history.

Comments: (7)

Anayanis
Well researched and documented book tells the story of the Enigma machine and the valiant people who worked day and night to break enemy codes to help us win World War II. If you have read "Enigma," or seen "The Imitation Game," you have tiny bits and pieces of the story. This book presents the entire story. It is well written, fascinating, and wonderful to read. BTW, one of the many people who worked on "Ultra," as the secret decrypts were known, later became a United States Supreme Court Justice! Although not relevant to a review of the book, if you are in the Washington, D.C. area, there is an awesome museum that is "off the beaten path" where you can see one of the actual Enigma machines. It is the National Cryptologic Museum, next door to and operated by retired employees of the NSA:

https://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic_heritage/museum/
Steelcaster
Way to detailed for me. Difficult read... complicated topic in itself however, the way it is written does not help... I have a sense that the author put too much emphasis on this tool as the means of winning the war... seems . However, gave me the motivation to investigate Churchil to check if indeed, this secret tool was so useful during the WW2.
Tcaruieb
Fabulous record of WWII British intelligence's tour de force. I had but a general idea on how this relatively small group of cipher specialists contributed so enormously to allied victory. It was high time that these folks, so long kept in the shadow of big military names, finally got the recognition they so truly deserved. I for one owe my freedom to these men and women.
Velellan
An excellent account of the strategic and tactical use of Ultra decrypts. Required reading to understand how Ultra intelligence was actually used. Densely packed but a fascinating read
MrRipper
I read this many years ago. I think it's excellent. It really opened my eyes to a part of World War II that was not discussed much during the Cold War years. I highly recommend it, if you're interested in learning how intel was gathered through code breaking, and what was done with the intel. This includes who the intel was shared with, and decisions regarding military action based upon the intel. There are some things addressed in this book that will cause you to shake your head, and maybe even make you angry.
Xal
I loaned my original book to someone that never returned it. I want my grandson to read about world war two.
NI_Rak
This review was based on the out-of-print hard-cover version. It is nice to see that it has been reissued as a paperback.

This book was originally published thirty years ago, just a few years after the information concerning the breaking of the German Enigma cipher machine was made public. It was one of the first books to look at the impact of this breakthrough on the Western European aspects of WWII. It does not describe any of the actual code breaking per se, only the important influence that this had on the war.

Given that the book is thirty years old and that newer books covering the Enigma cipher and the Ultra secret have been published, one can reasonably ask why they should invest time on this book. I think that this book is useful because:
1. It is the classic source that many other books reference
2. Being written 25 years after the end of the war, the author had a very important perspective and was allowed to interview many of the participants. Twenty five to forty years is, in my opinion, the best time frame to write a history of any event. Twenty-five years gives some time for emotions to cool and allow for a more dispassionate look at events (a little longer is even better). Unfortunately, after 40 years many of the senior participants are dead, making interviews impossible. Thus, this book was written at the beginning of this critical period. Books written today must rely on previously published books (like this one) and on dairies, manuscripts and archives.
3. I have read a number of the more recent books concerning the Ultra secret but I have still learned new things from this book. For instance, I learned that the Colossus computer was developed not to break the Enigma code, but to break a sophisticated radio-teletype code. The book makes it clear the B-Dienst (a German code breaking group) broke the British convoy code but not the British Naval cipher (some books make it seem as if B-Dienst broke all of the British codes). There is a very nice chapter on the Special Liaison Units and the process by which Enigma decrypts were disseminated, while still keeping secret he fact that the Enigma code was broken.

I recommend this book for those interested in the history of WWII, but this is not the book for you if you are primarily interested in how the Enigma cipher was broken. If that is you primary interest, I recommend Budiansky's "Battle of Wits" and "Enigma" by Hugh Sebag-Montefiore (which focuses on the capture of code machines and code books, but also has information about the code breaking process, but not quite as much as Budiansky's book). I give the book 4 stars instead of five because it is a bit dated and because of the lack of this code breaking information.
Another British author attempting to make a book read as if the British won WW II all by themselves. Why is it so hard for the British to admit the truth?
Ultra Goes to War download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Ronald Lewin
ISBN: 0671828444
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Pocket; 1st edition (May 1, 1980)