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Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results download epub

by Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg,Michael E. Porter


Epub Book: 1259 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1539 kb.

These are some of the questions that authors Michael Porter of Harvard Business School and Elizabeth Teisberg of University of Virginia School of Business attempt to answer.

These are some of the questions that authors Michael Porter of Harvard Business School and Elizabeth Teisberg of University of Virginia School of Business attempt to answer. The book paints an accurate portrait of the shortcomings of the US health care system, which fails to identify and scale up providers who provide the highest quality health care at the lowest cost.

Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results. Professor Michael E. Porter Harvard Business School. National Association of Chain Drug Stores Annual Meeting May 2, 2006. This presentation draws on a forthcoming book with Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg (Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results, Harvard Business School Press).

Competition in the health care system takes place at the wrong levels on the wrong. Value equals health outcomes achieved per dollar spent or outcomes/cost. Depending on the perspective that one takes when evaluating treatment outcomes, especially in our discussion of population vs patient based care, this variable drives various metrics. What is ultimately chosen to be included can impact the practice patterns of physicians and their interactions with patients.

Redefining Health Care book. health care system is in crisis  . and change for the better but not for the costlier if competition in health care is redefined and then conducted as Porter and Teisberg advocate.

In "Redefining Health Care", internationally renowned strategy expert Michael E. Porter and innovation expert Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg reveal the . Porter and innovation expert Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg reveal the underlying and largely overlooked causes of the problem and provide a powerful prescription for change. The authors argue that participants in the health care system have competed to shift costs, accumulate bargaining power, and restrict services rather than create value for patients. This book argues that participants in the health care system have competed to shift costs, accumulate bargaining power, and restrict services rather than create value for patients.

In Redefining Health Care, internationally renowned strategy expert Michael Porter and innovation expert Elizabeth Teisberg . Based on an exhaustive study of the .

In Redefining Health Care, internationally renowned strategy expert Michael Porter and innovation expert Elizabeth Teisberg reveal the underlying-and largely overlooked-causes of the problem, and provide a powerful prescription for change. health care system, Redefining Health Care lays out a breakthrough framework for redefining the way competition in health care delivery takes place-and unleashing stunning improvements in quality and efficiency.

Items related to Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition. Michael E. Porter; Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results. ISBN 13: 9781591397786. Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results. Porter; Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg. In Redefining Health Care, internationally renowned strategy expert Michael Porter and innovation expert Elizabeth Teisberg reveal the underlying-and largely overlooked-causes of the problem, and provide a powerful prescription for change.

Health Care, Costs are high and rising, Services are restricted and fall well short of recommended care, In other services, there is overuse of care, Standards. 20060719 HIT – 07182006.

Redefining Health Care : Creating Value-Based Competition on Results. by Michael E. Porter and Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg.

The U.S. health care system is in crisis. At stake are the quality of care for millions of Americans and the financial well-being of individuals and employers squeezed by skyrocketing premiums—not to mention the stability of state and federal government budgets.In Redefining Health Care, internationally renowned strategy expert Michael Porter and innovation expert Elizabeth Teisberg reveal the underlying—and largely overlooked—causes of the problem, and provide a powerful prescription for change.The authors argue that competition currently takes place at the wrong level—among health plans, networks, and hospitals—rather than where it matters most, in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of specific health conditions. Participants in the system accumulate bargaining power and shift costs in a zero-sum competition, rather than creating value for patients. Based on an exhaustive study of the U.S. health care system, Redefining Health Care lays out a breakthrough framework for redefining the way competition in health care delivery takes place—and unleashing stunning improvements in quality and efficiency.With specific recommendations for hospitals, doctors, health plans, employers, and policy makers, this book shows how to move health care toward positive-sum competition that delivers lasting benefits for all.

Comments: (7)

Virtual
Porter's theories on management are the bread-and-butter of management theory but he knows little about healthcare. It would be fantastic if his elegant theories worked for this industry, but they don't.

Serious flaws:
Authors: Care value should be measured by outcomes.
Reality: This is the fundamental problem with the healthcare market is that even the end-user of cannot fully assess the outcome not to mention the medical interventions' contributions to that outcome. Diseases recur and response to medical treatment varies so greatly that doctors rarely agree on the simplest courses of treatment. Only for the most common disease states will there be consensus on intervention. The authors compare the healthcare consumer to the institutional purchaser of computer systems, people that are generally IT experts. This is akin to comparing all patients to nurses.

Authors: Competition should exist at a national level.
Reality: Patients are cured locally because sick, pregnant, working people, etc., do not want to travel to another city to get specialized care. In fact, Guy David's studies show that proximity of less than half a mile holds more sway for patients than expertise. One can't purchase healthcare over the internet. Nor can patients in the bottom 50% of wage-earners travel to another metropolitan area every month to see a field expert.

Authors: Community-based hospitals repeatedly produce better outcomes than academic institutions
Reality: Patients with difficult-to-treat medical conditions are referred to or self-refer to academic medical centers so the sample group is biased.

It's no surprise that Porter missed some of the most obvious aspects of defining the problem. The acknowledgements section of the book contains few of the renowned experts in the field. The centers of knowledge do not lie in the management departments of Harvard or Darden. The authors seem to only have corroborated their theories with individuals from other industries, second-rate scholars, and politicians.

It was frustrating to have to read 411 pages of repetitive and ignorant text. While Porter has created groundbreaking theories in management (specifically of manufacturing and less-specialized service industries) he is attempting to fit his famous theories where they do not fit.

One must admire the attempt to write a comprehensive solution to the problem of the US healthcare system. However, it's an effort fraught with laziness and little introspection. The book, however, has a decent reference section. Either the authors did not read these papers themselves or chose to ignore the most salient points in the works of the field experts. If you want to real scoop, read Halvorson, Pauly, Danzon, Fisher, or anyone else who has studied this field for more than the authors' seven years.

Halvorson's Health Care Reform Now is a far superior book because it provides actionable remedies for the health care problem. Furthermore, Halvorson has 30 years of healthcare experience (compared to Porter's 3 years when he wrote this book). In addition, Halvorson has actually implemented his suggestions. Also, he cites credible organizations and publications that actually support his suggestions (RAND, IOM) whereas Porter cites and collaborates with organizations merely willing to collaborate with him (Dartmouth and Harvard - two institutions with very little research and health care specialists).

Halvorson's book may not have as thick a list of citations as Porter's; however, it makes its point more concisely and much more effectively than Porter's.

In Porter's defense, since writing this book, he has become more knowledgeable about health care and his arguments are starting to make more sense. Redefining Healthcare proves the complexity of health care by demonstrating how difficult it is to apply basic theories of other industries to fix the health care system.

Halvorson's book along with R. Lawton Burn's The Business of Healthcare Innovation are the two most valuable books on the American health care system. You can read them both in half the time it will take you to read Redefining Healthcare and you will be twice as knowledgeable.
Geny
Great baseline for anyone who wants to understand the gamut of the healthcare market and all the key players - employers, plans, providers, consumers, suppliers. Yes it’s all covered and value based care and how to achieve VBC is well treated.
Akisame
This book has received probably disproportionate attention due to Prof. Porter's notoriety as a strategic thinking theorist. There are better overall books on healthcare policy available. In particular I recommend the Bodenheimer/Grumbach books, one on healthcare policy and one on primary care, Dr. Arnold Relman's book, A Second Opinion, Strained Mercy, an outstanding and thorough analysis of healthcare economics with particular regard to Canada's healthcare system and Pricing the Priceless a more technically-oriented economic analysis by Prof. Joseph Newhouse, among other books.

I find the analysis of the USA healthcare system by Profs. Porter and Teisberg to generally be excellent, although I find it wanting in regard to their disparagement of a single-payer/single-insurer system and to their description and analysis of healthcare systems outside the USA. From my perspective private health plans play only a net negative role in the system. The authors' analysis of how the health insurance market works is quite good. However their recommendation that a system of private insurers should persist is refuted by their own analysis! A single payer/insurer system will not cure many problems of the USA system, as they clearly point out, but it does remove the inherently dysfunctional characteristics of private insurance, not least of which is its failure to meet the needs of the uninsured - a very large number - and its inherent propensity to exclude the very people who need coverage and care. The authors rightly point out that mandatory health insurance along with risk-pooling among insurers to spread the costs of those insured individuals who generate the highest costs is a "solution" to the current non-functioning system, but the same result, at lower cost and with much greater simplicity, can be achieved through a single payer/insurer.

The other key aspect of healthcare - how it is delivered - is ultimately more important than the financing/insurance side. The authors provide excellent analysis and recommendations in this regard. They correctly address the aspects of the healthcare market that prevent its functioning as a "competitive" market, specifically the abysmal lack of patient information on prices for services, on outcomes of actions by providers, comparative statistics on provider performance and similar. They also provide an interesting report by the Cleveland Clinic on outcomes, i.e. results, of the Clinic's heart surgery activity. They appropriately use this as an example of the kind of reporting that is needed.

The authors' analysis of healthcare systems outside the USA is skimpy and inaccurate in my opinion. The authors underplay the demonstrated efficacy of government-funded systems that outperform the USA system almost across the board in gross measures of outcomes (infant mortality and longevity) and vastly outperform the US system in regard to cost. They gloss over the fact that per capita costs in the USA are 2.5 times! the average per capita costs in other OECD countries. It is not as though the costs are say 10% above the average with comparable outcomes. They are 150% higher with worse outcomes. Instead of noting this and analyzing it thoroughly, the authors assert that waiting times and rationing of care are significant problems in those countries, assertions which are simply not borne out by the facts. Also the fact that (mostly) single-payer/insurer systems function well universally does not fit the authors' main thesis, so rather than revise the thesis based on this evidence they choose to ignore the evidence.

As a consequence of these limitations I rate the book with 4 stars rather than 5. Too bad, because most of the book is excellent.
Malanim
"Redefining Health Care" begins with data detailing the failures of America's "health system" - the highest and most rapidly rising costs among modern nations, combined with millions of uninsured, high error rates, and an average 17 years for the results of clinical trials to become standard clinical practice. Thus, the puzzle: "Why is competition failing in health care?"

Porter and Teisberg's answer is that it focuses far too much on cost-reduction, increasing negotiating power, providing broad-lines of service, and cost-shifting, and instead should focus on long-term value (results vs. costs) for patients. Key to accomplishing this is the collection of standardized patient outcome data (preferably risk-adjusted) that are used to identify providers needing improvement and sources from which that improvement can be gleaned, as well as in guiding patient decision-making.

"Redefining Health Care" also asserts that its recommendations are not just theories, but also supported by a number of cited examples.

This book provides a clear vision of how the U.S. can reduce health care costs while improving patient outcomes - without increased complexity. It should be read by legislators at both the state and national level, as well as by health care providers.
Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg,Michael E. Porter
ISBN: 1591397782
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press; 1 edition (May 25, 2006)
Pages: 528 pages