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Personality, Character, and Leadership In The White House: Psychologists Assess the Presidents download epub

by Thomas R. Raschingbauer,Steven J. Rubenzer


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Thomas R. Faschingbauer

Thomas R. Faschingbauer. Personality psychologists and political psychologists increasingly have been interested in assessing personality characteristics and other individual differences among politicians (. Greenstein & Lerner, 1971;Rubenzer & Faschingbauer, 2004;Simonton, 1990). A central issue has been that collecting self-reports from politicians and other historical or well-known figures is usually not possible. Finally, experts and students also assess consistently the personality of selected other political figures beyond Trump – Angela Merkel, and two leading figures in Dutch politics.

Steven Rubenzer and Dr. Thomas Faschingbauer asked 120 experts, including biographers, historians, presidential advisers, and other knowledge-able sources, to rate the presidents by filling out standardized personality tests. For each president that fell within their area of expertise, the evaluators completed a 592-item questionnaire regarding personality, intelligence, and behavior

Dr There are Washington, Lincoln and Kennedy in the list of outliers

Steven Rubenzer and Dr. Thomas Faschingbauer asked 120 experts, inc Personality, Character, and Leadership in the White House is the first book-length work to present truly scientific personality evaluations of the American presidents. This benchmark work dramatically improves the state-of-the-art in classifying presidents and predicting performance in the White House. There are Washington, Lincoln and Kennedy in the list of outliers. Very interesting to know which trait makes good presidents, which is nessecary for politics and how diverse is the personality pool of presidents. Nov 30, 2008 Dorothy rated it liked it. For each president that fell within their area of expertise, the evaluators completed a 592-item questionnaire regarding personality, intelligence, and behavior. Personality, Character, and Leadership in the White House: Psychologists. By Steven J. Rubenzer, Thomas R.

Steven J. Faschinbauer. Personality, Character, and Leadership in the White House is the first book-length work to present truly scientific personality evaluations of the American presidents. Dr. Steven Rubenzer and Dr. Thomas Faschingbauer asked 120 experts, including biographers, historians, presidential advisers, and other knowledgeable sources, to rate the presidents by filling out a standardized personality test.

In The White House: Psychologists Assess the Presidents .

Personality, Character, and Leadership In The White House: Psychologists Assess the Presidents.

Published October 15, 2005 by Potomac Books In. .ANDREW JACKSON had just been shot in a duel.

Thomas R. Raschingbauer Steven J. Rubenzer.

in the White House is the first book-length work to present truly scientific personality evaluations of the American presidents. Steven J. Rubenzer and Thomas R. More information: Table of contents.

Personality, Character, and Leadership in the White House is the first book-length work to present truly scientific personality evaluations of the American presidents.

Quoted in Steven J. Faschingbauer, Personality, Character, and Leadership in the White House: Psychologists Assess the Presidents (Potomac Books, 2004), 147. 39. Thomas, Ike’s Bluff, introduction, 17. 40. Thomas, Ike’s Bluff, 161.

Personality, Character, and Leadership in the White House is the first book-length work to present truly scientific personality evaluations of the American presidents. This benchmark work dramatically improves the state-of-the-art in classifying presidents and predicting performance in the White House. Dr. Steven Rubenzer and Dr. Thomas Faschingbauer asked 120 experts, including biographers, historians, presidential advisers, and other knowledge-able sources, to rate the presidents by filling out standardized personality tests. For each president that fell within their area of expertise, the evaluators completed a 592-item questionnaire regarding personality, intelligence, and behavior. From the results, the authors identify nine traits related to presidential success, examine how the presidents’ personalities affected their job performance, and list their scores on the major dimensions of personality. Rubenzer and Faschingbauer provide revealing insights about every American president and profile twenty-one of them in detail, including all post–World War II presidents and all of the “great” presidents. In addition to revolutionizing the way we look at the presidency, the study offers entertaining and unexpected conclusions. For instance, which recent president’s personality and character most closely resembles those of Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln? The answer may surprise you. Presidential scholars, students, and anyone who likes to be well informed when discussing their political preferences will find this enlightening book irresistible. Visit www.testingthepresidents.com and www.PersonalityinHistory.com for more information.

Comments: (7)

Kizshura
Steven Rubenzer and Thomas Faschingbauer have found a way to give personality tests to U.S. presidents from George Washington to George W. Bush. No, they don't use a time machine. Instead they administer a 600-item personality questionnaire to a select group of historians and biographers. "By studying most presidents in depth, biographers did most of the hard work. We tried to mine their knowledge, focus their judgments, and provide a shared language and format...The process of biography is necessarily personal and subjective, which by definition precludes objective, scientific analysis. Our study incorporates two strategies to improve this situation: multiple raters and the use of objective personality tests to reduce idiosyncratic judgments and bias." (p. 311)

Their raters included both generalists who have studied all U.S. presidents and specialists who have focused on one or two. Their questions ask about character, job performance and personality. The Revised NEO Personality Inventory is their key instrument, scoring each president on the "Big Five" personality dimensions of Emotional Stability, Extraversion, Openness to Experience, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. Each of the five personality factors consists of a number of subscales, thoroughly explained in the first chapter. A set of detailed technical appendices describe the authors' methods, correlations between scales and other details needed to evaluate the technical quality of their work.

Personality profiles for each president are compared to other presidents and to the general public. As a group, presidents are more Extraverted and Conscientious than average Americans and less Agreeable and Open to Experience. There are interesting findings in the subscales, including that presidents are more assertive and achievement-oriented and less straightforward than the rest of us. The authors' examine personality traits related to presidential success and popularity. Surprises here include an increasing role for extraversion and need for power and a decreasing role for traditionally-defined "character" across two centuries of presidential performance.

Using statistical clustering techniques, the authors identify eight different types of presidents, each group with a common personality profile. They name these groups Dominators, Introverts, Good Guys, Innocents, Actors, Maintainers, Philosophes, and Extraverts. The authors describe the shared characteristics of presidents in each cluster and contrast their differences. Their brief biographical sketches of individual presidents are well-written and help readers to understand the strengths and limitations of personality profiles compared to traditional narrative biography. These authors do not "push" their own methods overmuch, noting--even highlighting--where their conclusions depart from the judgments of history. The effect is an informative and restrained characterization of each president.

This book presents a careful and responsible integration of "scientific" personality assessment with traditional historical biography. It is good reading for anyone interested in U.S. presidents or in personality methods, generally. I particularly recommend it to psychology students eager to see psychology's relevance to history and politics. It is also thought-provoking for text analysts who might devise ways to extract personality profiles directly from presidential biographies or collections of personal papers.
Frlas
Great book. Bought it used on a good deal. The descriptions of individual Presidents is interesting, but I enjoyed the descriptions of the Presidents as a group even more. I admit that I am looking at the 2016 Presidential candidates in a different light now.
Mr_KiLLaURa
Personality, Character, and Leadership in the White House: Psychologists Assess the Presidents by Steven Rubenzer and Thomas Faschingbauer is unusual in that it combines a number of ingredients (an interesting subject, solid science and a good read) in a way that one seldom sees in a non-fiction book and does it successfully. This is a book that will interest history buffs and mental health professionals equally. In Personality, Character and Leadership in the White House, the authors have used a well know psychological test of normal personality dynamics which can be completed by individuals who know a living or deceased subject well. Rubenzer and Faschingbauer assembled groups of historians who were very familiar with particular presidents and had them complete the test on American presidents based on their knowledge of their personalities and behavior. The results provide insights into the qualities that make a good (or bad) president as well as how these leaders differ from the general population. The book is straightforwardand the authors do not inject their personal political beliefs into the mix. In addition, it is well written and jargon/psychobabble free. I highly recommend this book to both professionals and general readers who want to know more about what motivates our presidents, past and present
inetserfer
The author's purpose was to reduce to a minimum individual opinions by a statistical approach that converted differing ideas on the part of so-called experts to a decimal conclusion. These results were compared with other presidents examined in an attempt to determine who among them were best qualified for the highest position of the land. They were also compared to the average American. My rating of just four stars is based on the description of the method used that took up a considerable part of the first part of the book. As essential as it probably was, I found myself bored by what to me is less than an interesting discipline. At the same time I agreed with their conclusions, although I do not believe that a single discipline standing alone is sufficient adequately to assign qualities to particular presidents. I was truly enlightened by what I discovered from the method used, and must admit that the characterization formed by the connection of the dots, so to speak, concurred with many of my own opinions based upon the discipline of History alone. I question whether the technique can actually foretell how well a candidtate will perform if elected as president. It would be helpful, I think, if the test were applied to Vice Presidential hopefuls because there are several significant instances where a Vice President assumed the office of President without being elected. In the most recent election, I felt those chosen to perform as Vice President was vital to my decision, and honestly placed my vote in jeopardy. By the same token, after seeing the performance results as indicated by the author's technique, I am of the conclusion that whoever is elected, or who assumes the presidency, will not necessarily result detrimentally to our nation. Nevertheless, the evidence drawn from the author's endeavor might give the electorate the means to better decide who should be selected based on more than emotion alone. There is no doubt that the work, audacious as it seems, will be of interest to all who read it. It would be well worth the time.
Personality, Character, and Leadership In The White House: Psychologists Assess the Presidents download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Thomas R. Raschingbauer,Steven J. Rubenzer
ISBN: 1574888161
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Potomac Books; New edition edition (October 15, 2005)
Pages: 432 pages