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Re-Thinking Green: Alternatives to Environmental Bureaucracy download epub

by Carl P. Close,Robert Higgs


Epub Book: 1819 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1493 kb.

Volume 10, No. 1 (Spring 2007).

Volume 10, No. Re-Thinking Green: Alternatives to Environmental Bureaucracy is an excellent book of easy-reading essays dealing with environmental policy from the perspective of free-market environmentalism which combines ideas of public choice theory and Austrian economics. Not surprisingly, most of those evaluations do not end up very complimentary to current environmental policy.

Re-Thinking Green exposes the myths that have contributed to failed environmental policies and proposes bold alternatives that recognize the power of incentives and the limitations of political and regulatory processes. It addresses some of the most hotly debated environmental issues and shows how entrepreneurship and property rights can be utilized to promote environmental quality and economic growth.

Can we do better than this failed environmental bureaucracy? .

Can we do better than this failed environmental bureaucracy? The noted contributors to this volume answer with a resounding yes. Re-Thinking Green exposes the myths that have contributed to failed environmental policies and proposes bold alternatives that recognize the power of incentives and the limitations of political and regulatory processes. It addresses some of the most hotly debated environmental issues and shows how entrepreneurship and property rights can be utilized to promote environmental quality and economic growth

Re-Thinking Green exposes the myths that have contributed to failed environmental . Chapter 1 Introduction Robert Higgs and Carl P. Close. In Re-Thinking Green, Higgs and Close present a remarkable book that should send the green bureaucracy to their collective battle stations.

Robert Higgs, Carl P.

Re-Thinking Green book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Re-Thinking Green: Alternatives to Environmental Bureaucracy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Re-Thinking Green: Alternatives to Environmental Bureaucracy with Carl P. Close (2005). The Challenge of Liberty: Classical Liberalism Today with Carl P. Close (2006). Opposing the Crusader State: Alternatives to Global Interventionism with Carl P. Close (2007). "What Is the Point of My Libertarian Anarchism?" LewRockwell. a b "Senior Fellow Robert Higgs. Independent Institute. World Economic Growth, 1980–1999: A Growth-Regression Approach. p. 9. September 2003. Archived from the original.

Public Good Transaction Cost Environmental Policy Global Warming Private Property. Themes, Approaches, and Differences with Environmental Economics. These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper, TI 2000-080/3. Block, Walter E. 1990. Environmental Report Cards-Endangered Species on PERC. org/pdf/reportcard 2004/6endangspecies.

Environmental quality has been a major public concern since the first Earth Day in 1970, yet the maze of environmental laws and regulations enacted since then has fostered huge government bureaucracies better known for waste and failure than for innovation and success.Can we do better than this failed environmental bureaucracy? The noted contributors to this volume answer with a resounding "yes."Re-Thinking Green exposes the myths that have contributed to failed environmental policies and proposes bold alternatives that recognize the power of incentives and the limitations of political and regulatory processes. It addresses some of the most hotly debated environmental issues and shows how entrepreneurship and property rights can be utilized to promote environmental quality and economic growth.Re-Thinking Green will challenge readers with new paradigms for resolving environmental problems, stimulate discussion on how best to "humanize" environmental policy, and inspire policymakers to seek effective alternatives to environmental bureaucracy.

Comments: (6)

Steep
This is a terrific read. The environmental-loonies should study this book.
Auau
Re-Thinking Green is published by The Independent Institute, which claims its "program adheres to the highest standards of independent inquiry and is pursued regardless of political or social biases and conventions." The reader, therefore, hopes for a balanced and varied discussion of environmental policy and government regulation. Re-Thinking Green, however, turns out to be a series of articles by anti-regulatory ideologues that are variations (with only the slightest variation) on a theme. The theme? Regulation is bad. Market is good.

It is not difficult to take pot shots at regulatory failures and bureaucratic stupidity -- its child's play really. But the authors of Re-thinking Green seem to have worked themselves into such an anti-government frenzy that they cannot see straight. Having concluded that regulation equals damnation and markets equal salvation, the authors were generally not inconvenienced by half the facts. Every scenario became an argument for more market and less market interference. The Independent Institute should be known as the INDEPENDENT FROM ANY KIND OF MARKET INTERFERENCE INSTITUTE. Read this book and you will get one side (and therefore a lopsided view) of the regulation vs. market debate.

If you are looking for a book with balance and depth start with Everything For Sale by Robert Kuttner. Kuttner's book discusses both the virtues and limits of markets. Unlike Re-Thinking Green, Everything For Sale truly is an "independent inquiry pursued regardless of political or social biases and conventions."
Samut
Great book!
Eigeni
Perhaps the title to this review is incorrect, after all can a religion ever be realistic? Clearly the answer is "no" as all religions require an extensive amount of faith on the part of the believer. Unfortunately, however, this new religion has become a Federal Government policy -- one might argue in violation of the Constitution's prohibition that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion..." (1st Amendment to the Constitution.)

At any rate, perhaps the primary theme in this collection of essays dealing with the trend toward hugely bloated and costly environmental bureaucracies at the federal level is that not only is this trend excessively costly, but ineffective, wasteful, counter-productive to its purposes, based on junk science, and ill-conceived. The case is made that the free-rider problem extends into the government bureaucracy (and in the political sphere) due to there being no risk to politicians or bureaucrats for bad decisions and only benefits to them for passing costs and restrictions on to others. In essence, the federal bureaucrats and politicians are the free-riders that render their own actions ineffective. (The free-rider problem is normally stated as a reason for government action in that if private actions were taken then many people would receive benefits from those actions although they had incurred no costs or risks associated with those actions.)

This work also impinges on the supposed correlation between the industrial revolution and global warming and the idea that humans are bringing about global warming. That the facts are actually otherwise (see Solomon; "The Deniers", Murray; "The Really Inconvenient Truths", and Spencer; "Climate Confusion") clearly makes the human causation of global warming an act of faith (in response to extensive and often hysterical propaganda.)

The essays are organized into eight groups as follows:
The Seeds of Environmental Bureaucracy.
Global Issues.
Endangered Species.
Entrepreneurship, Property Rights & Land Use.
Urban Environments.
The By-products of Environmental Bureaucracy.
Debating Market-Based Environmentalism.
Environmental Philosophy.

Most of the essays in these sections recount specific policies by government or environmentists and the impacts of those policies. Overwhelmingly the effects of those polices have turned out to be negative or having very detrimental unintended consequences (one is tempted to say "unexpected consequences" due to a lack of thorough understanding of the problems, reliance on junk science, or simple incompetent or inane actions.)

My favorite essay was the one by Nelson on "Does 'Existence Value' Exist? Environmental Economics Encroaches on Religion." Nelson concludes that the concept of existence value is not scientific but rather a quasi-religious concept that creates more problems than it solves. It answers a religious question with economics that leads to absurdities and was a typical attempt to find justification for an idea that was wrong-headed from the beginning and to help maintain an unneeded bureaucracy.

In short, this is a highly important book that should be required reading in all political science and economics curriculae in American universities. Unfortunately, I note that I am only the third reviewer and the obvious conclusion is that this work has received little notice or wide dissemination. That is truly a shame. And once again, read the 1 star review to see the usual ad hominem attack, this time against the publisher, The Independent Institute, when anyone challenges political correctness or conventional wisdom. One is tempted to reference Hayek, "The Road To Serfdom", to some readers. Political correctness and the creeping socialism it contains clearly fits Hayek's concepts of the dangers of organizations like the environmental bureaucracy leading us like lemmings into totalitarism.

I highly recommend this book. The reader is advised to read it carefully and make up his own mind rather than simply buying into the propaganda that has been spewed forth on these subjects by special interests and religious zealots since 1970. One hopes it is not too late for rationality to enter the fray.

The reader would be also advised to read Niskinen's work on "bureaupathic" behavior and the tendency of bureaucrats to maximize their budgets and increase their bureaucracies at all times at others' expense. Many times government bureaucracies are not the solution -- they are the problem.
Gldasiy
As if the usual march towards socialism was not bad enough, the same type of blind fervor which once led millions to communist misery lures a new generation to the environmentalist movement. This book provides many great essays that show how the usual economic ignorance and faith in government gets in the way of material progress and the clean environment it attempts to achieve.

The essay on population growth is perhaps one of the most important ones. Population growth under a free-market economy is a blessing. How sad that due to economic ignorance countries like China have such draconian one-child policies.
Arar
It was terribly painful to have to read this book for a graduate college course, but i can see the importance of knowing the enemy. Just like terrorists, it is important to understand their thought processes in order to be able to counter their threats. The holes in every argument they make are so glaringly obvious, it is almost insulting. To think that the free market alone will solve any of our environmental problems is even more ignorant than thinking that we must must go out of our way to protect every blade of grass and grain of sand on the planet. If our generation were the last to make use of our Planet Earth, i would give this book a high rating. Unless you are some sort of environment hating monster (i.e. Neo-conservative extremist), this book will be painful to read. It felt like i was reading some sort of political propaganda the entire time! The book is written at a high school reading level, so just about anyone can read it.
Re-Thinking Green: Alternatives to Environmental Bureaucracy download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Carl P. Close,Robert Higgs
ISBN: 0945999976
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Independent Institute (July 15, 2005)
Pages: 440 pages