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Forced to Be Good: Why Trade Agreements Boost Human Rights download epub

by Emilie M. Hafner-Burton


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Why have human rights provisions increasingly been attached to preferential trade agreements in recent years? Forced to Be Good is the best single treatment of the issue I have read.

Why have human rights provisions increasingly been attached to preferential trade agreements in recent years? Forced to Be Good is the best single treatment of the issue I have read. Emilie Hafner-Burton argues, counterintuitively, that it's not because human rights NGOs have affected norms. She shows that a shift in institutional politics within the United States and the European Union made it impossible for political executives to negotiate trade deals as they had in the past.

Forced to Be Good is fascinating and important. Her book poses a key challenge to the conventional wisdom on how norms of justice spread, and it will be of substantial interest to scholars and policymakers alike. -Edward D. Mansfield, Hum Rosen Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania.

Hafner-Burton’s Forced to Be Good provides a timely study of the importance of preferential trade agreements (PTA) in raising the . Since their origins, trade agreements have had positive impacts upon human rights.

Hafner-Burton’s Forced to Be Good provides a timely study of the importance of preferential trade agreements (PTA) in raising the standards of international human rights. The age of globalization continues to increase connections among nations and individuals through trade. Since their origins, trade agreements have had positive impacts upon human rights

Forced to Be Good: Why Trade Agreements Boost Human Rights, Cornell University Press, 2009. Hafner-Burton, Emilie; Pollack, Mark A. (September 2002). Mainstreaming gender in global governance". European Journal of International Relations.

Forced to Be Good: Why Trade Agreements Boost Human Rights, Cornell University Press, 2009. A Behavioral Approach to International Cooperation. With Brad L. LeVeck, David G. Victor and James H. Fowler. International Organization, forthcoming. Sovereignty Costs, Human Rights Institutions, and Democratization. With Ed Mansfield and Jon Pevehouse. With Mark A. Pollack. Pollack, Mark . Hafner-Burton, Emilie (January 2000).

Forced to be good: Why trade agreements boost human rights. International regimes for human rights. Cornell University Press, 2011. Mainstreaming gender in global governance. E Hafner-Burton, MA Pollack. The cognitive revolution and the political psychology of elite decision making. EM Hafner-Burton, DA Hughes, DG Victor.

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Similar books and articles. Small Steps: Ending Trade's Splendid Isolation From Human Rights. Stephen J. Powell - manuscript. The Common Good and/or the Human Rights: Analysis of Some Papal Social Encyclicals and Their Contemporary Relevance. Wilson Muoha Maina - 2011 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (29):3-25. The Wto-Minus Strategy: Development and Human Rights Under Wto Law. Gillian Moon - unknown. Rights Enforcement, Trade-Offs, and Pluralism.

Emilie M. Handle: RePEc:spr:revint:v:5:y:2010:i:1:p:97-100 DOI: 1. 4. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Personal Name: Hafner-Burton, Emilie. Formatted Contents Note: Coercing human rights A path to answers Preferences Institutions Power Effects The future. Publication, Distribution, et. Ithaca Formatted Contents Note: Coercing human rights A path to answers Preferences Institutions Power Effects The future. Rubrics: Tariff preferences Social aspects Commercial treaties International trade Human rights Economic aspects.

Preferential trade agreements have become common ways to protect or restrict access to national markets in products and services. The United States has signed trade agreements with almost two dozen countries as close as Mexico and Canada and as distant as Morocco and Australia. The European Union has done the same. In addition to addressing economic issues, these agreements also regulate the protection of human rights. In Forced to Be Good, Emilie M. Hafner-Burton tells the story of the politics of such agreements and of the ways in which governments pursue market integration policies that advance their own political interests, including human rights.

How and why do global norms for social justice become international regulations linked to seemingly unrelated issues, such as trade? Hafner-Burton finds that the process has been unconventional. Efforts by human rights advocates and labor unions to spread human rights ideals, for example, do not explain why American and European governments employ preferential trade agreements to protect human rights. Instead, most of the regulations protecting human rights are codified in global moral principles and laws only because they serve policymakers' interests in accumulating power or resources or solving other problems. Otherwise, demands by moral advocates are tossed aside. And, as Hafner-Burton shows, even the inclusion of human rights protections in trade agreements is no guarantee of real change, because many of the governments that sign on to fair trade regulations oppose such protections and do not intend to force their implementation.

Ultimately, Hafner-Burton finds that, despite the difficulty of enforcing good regulations and the less-than-noble motives for including them, trade agreements that include human rights provisions have made a positive difference in the lives of some of the people they are intended-on paper, at least-to protect.


Forced to Be Good: Why Trade Agreements Boost Human Rights download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Emilie M. Hafner-Burton
ISBN: 0801446430
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (February 5, 2009)
Pages: 240 pages