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Federalism: Political Identity and Tragic Compromise download epub

by Edward Rubin,Malcolm Feeley


Epub Book: 1988 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1331 kb.

Malcolm M. Feeley and Edward Rubin expose the ambiguities of modern federalism, offering a powerful . Malcolm Feeley and Edward Rubin have published an excellent book

Malcolm M. Feeley and Edward Rubin expose the ambiguities of modern federalism, offering a powerful but generous treatise on the modern salience of the term. Malcolm Feeley and Edward Rubin have published an excellent book. Sanford Levinson, University of Texas at Austin At last, an insightful examination of federalism stripped of its romance. Larry Yackle, Boston University Professors Feeley and Rubin clearly define what is and is not federal system

Malcolm M. Larry Yackle, Boston University Professors Feeley and Rubin clearly define what is and is not federal system

By Malcolm M. Feeley and Edward Rubin.

The United States, Feeley and Rubin remind us, faced a similar situation in the eighteenth century as thirteen regionally distinct, ethnically diverse, and highly independent British colonies came together to found a nation. Despite the Civil War and the upheaval of the Civil Rights Movement, the federalist strategy ultimately succeeded.

This book serves the dual role of helping the reader understand federalism and providing a comparative framework from which to assess .

This book serves the dual role of helping the reader understand federalism and providing a comparative framework from which to assess the record of federal systems. Die Minderheitenpolitik der Europäischen Union: Probleme, Potentiale.

Rubin, Edward L. and Feeley, Malcolm . Federalism and Interpretation. Publius: The Journal of Federalism, Vol. 38, Issue 2, pp. 167-191, 2008. Edward L. Rubin (Contact Author).

Malcolm Feeley and Edward L. Rubin. Federalism: Political Identity and Tragic Compromise. dual federalism cooperative federalism American political development national policy state policy. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2008.

by Malcolm Feeley, Edward Rubin. ISBN 9780472116393 (978-0-472-11639-3) Hardcover, University of Michigan Press, 2008.

Federalism: Political Identity and Tragic Compromise. by Malcolm Feeley, Edward Rubin.

Federalism is one of the most influential concepts in modern political discourse as well as the focus of immense controversy resulting from the lack of a single coherent definition. Malcolm M. Feeley and Edward Rubin expose the ambiguities of modern federalism, offering a powerful but generous treatise on the modern salience of the term.

“Malcolm Feeley and Edward Rubin have published an excellent book.”—Sanford Levinson, University of Texas at Austin

“At last, an insightful examination of federalism stripped of its romance. An absolutely splendid book, rigorous but still accessible.”—Larry Yackle, Boston University

“Professors Feeley and Rubin clearly define what is and is not federal system. This book should be required for serious students of comparative government and American government.”—G. Ross Stephens, University of Missouri, Kansas City

“Feeley and Rubin have written a brilliant book that looks at federalism from many different perspectives—historical, political, and constitutional. Significantly expanding on their earlier pathbreaking work, they have explained the need for a theory of federalism and provided one. This is a must read book for all who are interested in the Constitution.”—Erwin Chemerinsky, Duke University School of Law


Comments: (2)

Burking
I disagree with the previous reviewer's comments.
I bought the book a year ago and would recommend it to students of political science, both undergrad and post-grad.
Feeley and Rubin in the text theorise the concept of federalism. Their definition of federalism is that "federalism is a political setting where a central polity grants some degee of autonomy to geographically defined regions or sub-divisions"

There is nowhere in the book where they base their theory on powersharing alone as a criteria for federating.
Read the book.
Kirizius
I haven't read this book, yet. However, I've decided to make a comment concerning a statement that I read under the title PRODUCT DESCRIPTION. The statement reads, "Federalism refers to a system in which a centralized national government shares power with member states."

I wonder if "THE Founders' would agree with that statement? I was always under the impression that the term Federalism refers to a system in which state governments share a portion of their power with a centralized national government.

Little wonder that the authors came to the conclusion that they did(judging from other statements referenced under PRODUCT DESCRIPTION).
Federalism: Political Identity and Tragic Compromise download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Edward Rubin,Malcolm Feeley
ISBN: 0472116398
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press (June 19, 2008)
Pages: 238 pages