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General Economic History (Social Science Classics Series) download epub

by Max Weber


Epub Book: 1582 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1231 kb.

The book is driven by his key theoretical concerns: the importance of political institutions; rationalization in world history; the evolutionary nature of social institutions; the role of religion and magic in social life.

Economic History, Social Science, Economics. agricultural organization and the problem of agrarian communism. the house community and the clan. the evolution of the family as.

General Economic History traces the historical development of each of these factors from their informal rational points of. .

General Economic History book. This book, the last work of the great German sociologist and historian Max Weber (1864–1920), is based on a series of lectures he delivered in 1919–20. The present volume brings together major ideas that explain economic life and change.

General Economic History. Social Science Classics Series. By (author) Max Weber. His work focused on the areas of the history and theology of religion, political systems, and organizational theory and behavior. He studied at the University of Heidelberg followed by the University of Berlin.

Items related to General Economic History (Cosimo Classics). Max Weber General Economic History (Cosimo Classics). ISBN 13: 9781602069725. General Economic History (Cosimo Classics).

e (General Economic History) (original - 1924). Staatssoziologie (Sociology of the State) (original - 1956). The Theory of Social and Economic Organization (Talcott Parsons' translation of volume 1 of Economy and Society) (original - 1915?, translation - 1947). Max Weber on the Methodology of the Social Sciences (translation 1949). General Economic History - The Social Causes of the Decay of Ancient Civilisation (original - 1927, translation 1950). The Religion of China: Confucianism and Taoism (translation - 1951).

Maximilian Karl Emil Weber (/ˈveɪbər/; German: ; 21 April 1864 – 14 June 1920) was a German sociologist, philosopher, jurist, and political economist. Weber is often cited, with Émile Durkheim and Karl Marx, as among the three founders of sociology

ductive years of. Max. Weber's life . Thus he did not come to the methodology of the social sciences as an outsider

ductive years of. Weber's life, when. had already done important work in economic and legal history and had taught economic theory as the incumbent of one of the most famous chairs in Germany; on the basis of original investigations, he had acquired a specialist's knowledge of the details of. German. eco-nomic and social structure. Thus he did not come to the methodology of the social sciences as an outsider. who. seeks to impose standards on practices and problems of which he is ignorant.

He also saw social stratification on the basis of status, which he separated from class. Weber argued that power came from three main sources

He also saw social stratification on the basis of status, which he separated from class. Whereas class was based on the economy (. market situation or relationship to the means of production) status was based on social position. He noted that some social systems had rigid status stratification (. the Hindu caste system) while others were more fluid. He also thought that economic power was only one source of power, again criticising Marx's idea that the bourgeoisie was the ruling class because of its economic position. Weber argued that power came from three main sources: Charismatic.

In General Economic History Max Weber focuses on the industrial enterprise for the provision of everyday wants, oriented toward profitability by means of rational capital accounting, as the institutional foundation of modern Western capitalism. This type of enterprise integrates into one institutional complex a constellation of six factors, including: formally free labor; free market trade; appropriation of the physical means of production; rational commercial practices; rational production of technology; and calculable law adjudicated and administered by the state. General Economic History traces the historical development of each of these factors from their informal rational points of origin through the feudal era to their emergence as formal rational elements in the modern capitalist industrial enterprise. The chapters on the history of modern citizenship and the modern rational state are of special significance as otherwise unavailable resources for an integrated view of Weber's work.

The new introduction by Ira J. Cohen is an original scholarly work of interest to all who study Max Weber's conception of modern Western capitalism.Theessay situates the institutional and cultural aspects of Weber's view of modern capitalism in the context of his overall vision of the emergence of formal rationality in the Western world. Both aspects of modern capitalism are shown to be defined by economic formal rationality, a type of orientation which is distinct from the legal formal rationality characteristic of Weber's conception of modern bureaucracy.


Comments: (3)

Zbr
Before reviewing the book I will say a few things about how it came about. This is *not* a book written by Weber himself -- instead it is reproduced from lecture notes in an economic history course that he gave. It does not detract from the genius of the book, but it does mean that the material occasionally feels a bit disorganized.

Now to the good parts.

Weber accounts world economic history up to modern capitalism from his particular vantage point. He starts with the agricultural village, goes to pre-capitalistic industry and mining, the commercial system before capitalism, as well as outlining the institutional and ideological foundations for modern capitalism.

The book is driven by his key theoretical concerns: the importance of political institutions; rationalization in world history; the evolutionary nature of social institutions; the role of religion and magic in social life. Despite the attention paid to sociological factors, the analysis is done without ever losing sight of the classic economic concerns: market pricing, investments being made in response to returns, money being a facilitator of exchange, the importance of incentives in the construction of financial contracts, etc. As an economic PhD student I feel myself at home.

In that sense it is the most comprehensive economic history I've read. Other histories often want to push their particular hypothesis, and their choice of material reflects this aim. Now Weber also has an hypothesis, but he also believes that every theory is partial, and shows this incompleteness by describing strange things off the beaten theoretical track. One of my personal favorites is that using the Arabic numeral system in accounting was seen as "unfair competition", which delayed its adoption.

This can be seen as eclectic, but is understandable once we realize that Weber wants to show his students that history is not a linear progression in perfect concord with his theory. It also allows us to get a glimpse of what he considered to be of secondary importance, and allows us to judge his theory.

Now some warning. The book is very dense and a bit unconventional in style. When we discussed it in our economic reading group, it could take half an hour to summarize 12 pages. Also, there are confusing side-tracks running into pages about the details of different monetary regimes, the structure of Germanic peasant villages, and financial contracts in Babylonia. In one sense, you are overwhelmed by Weber's vast erudition; in another sense, you think "get to the point".

But it is still an extremely useful book to read. Firstly, because you realize that there isn't "the point" with economic history, but a collection of facts which we have a partial theoretical understanding of, and that all our explanations have exceptions. Secondly, because he gives an excellent outline of the different concerns we need to bring to an analysis of history: technical, instiutional, ideological, religious.

In the end, you won't know everything about economic history, but you will have a much better sense of what there is to know.
Malodora
This book was assembled from student notes, but it contains the maturest condensation of Weber's world historical vision. Everything else has methodological strictures, but this compilation really provides his fullest thought. For example, Weber did not think that Protestantism caused capitalism, but one might suppose he did who read only his Protestant Ethic. That monographic effort was a deliberate attempt to examine the supply side, ignoring the rest, in order to make the point, then very novel, that economic activity is deeply cultural. The General Economic History also introduces middleman minorities, a topic that went on to become cultural and social capital a century later.
ᵀᴴᴱ ᴼᴿᴵᴳᴵᴻᴬᴸ
Early economics has been reduced by philosophers to making the relationship of master and slave productive. Max Weber makes fine distinctions in the kinds of relationships that gives the superior powers of life or death, or all powers except life and death, over people who are supposed to be doing the work. The financial system that makes Americans expect huge gains without producing much is like the $84 billion dollars expected to modernize the nuclear weapons systems in the next ten years: with the power to wipe out life on earth, Americans don't expect any powerful objections to setting up whatever form of collective financial suicide is likely to result from the marginal thinking of millionaires and billionaires.

People survived without electricity and indoor plumbing for most of recorded history, but basic expectations like transportation, as in Chapter XV:

Technical Requisites for the Transportation of Goods

had rowing and sailing instead of planes and airports for going long distances.

Chapter XI had Disintegration of the Guilds. We may discover news ways to arrive at domestic industry.
General Economic History (Social Science Classics Series) download epub
Politics & Government
Author: Max Weber
ISBN: 0878556907
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Transaction Publishers (January 1, 1981)
Pages: 438 pages