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Defining Student Success: The Role of School and Culture (Rutgers Series in Childhood Studies) download epub

by Lisa M. Nunn


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The key to success, our culture tells us, is a combination of talent and hard work. Defining Student Success shows how different schools foster dissimilar and sometimes conflicting ideas about what it takes to succeed-ideas that do more to preserve the status quo than to promote upward mobility. Lisa Nunn’s study of three public high schools reveals how students’ beliefs about their own success are shaped by their particular school environment and reinforced by curriculum and teaching.

Sweet Beagle Books Defining Student Success: The Role of School .

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A provocative work that will prompt a thorough reevaluation of the culture of secondary education, Defining Student Success shows how different schools, promoting modified versions of larger cultural ideas of success, foster distinct understandings of what it takes to succeed.

A provocative work that will prompt a thorough reevaluation of the culture of secondary education, Defining Student Success shows how different schools, promoting modified versions of larger cultural ideas of success, foster distinct understandings of what it takes to gs that d. .

The landscape of education in the United States is continually shifting. She is the author of Defining Student Success: The Role of School and Culture (2014, Rutgers University Press) and multiple journal articles on education, identity, and pedagogy, published in journals including Urban Education, The Journal of Homosexuality; Journal of LGBTQ Youth, and Insight: A Journal of Scholarly Teaching.

Congratulations to recent grad, Lisa Nunn, whose book (former . sr 1 4?ie UTF8&qid 1389828161&sr 8-4&keywords nunn%2C+lisa. Student-Success,5185.

ref sr 1 4?ie UTF8&qid 1389828161&sr 8-4&keywords nunn%2C+lisa. Filed under Graduate Students, Publications. Geoengineering and the Suppression of the Environmental Politics of Climate Change. Madsen Interviewed About China’s Happiness →.

Defining Student Success: The Role of School and Culture. Rutgers University Press, 2014.

1 MB. Periodical: Series: Rutgers Series in Childhood Studies. You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

Whereas childhood studies claims as its major focus "to understand childhood" .

Whereas childhood studies claims as its major focus "to understand childhood", the field of children's studies made from its beginnings the ontological claim that children must be viewed in their fullness as human beings, as a generational and social class in all their civil, political, social, economic and cultural dimensions. Nearly 100 students now minor in the area; other schools have begun similar programs". Rutgers University-Camden developed the first Childhood Studies Department in the United States to award degrees from BA through PhD.

The key to success, our culture tells us, is a combination of talent and hard work. Why then, do high schools that supposedly subscribe to this view send students to college at such dramatically different rates?  Why do students from one school succeed while students from another struggle? To the usual answer—an imbalance in resources—this book adds a far more subtle and complicated explanation. Defining Student Success shows how different schools foster dissimilar and sometimes conflicting ideas about what it takes to succeed—ideas that do more to preserve the status quo than to promote upward mobility.Lisa Nunn’s study of three public high schools reveals how students’ beliefs about their own success are shaped by their particular school environment and reinforced by curriculum and teaching practices. While American culture broadly defines success as a product of hard work or talent (at school, intelligence is the talent that matters most), Nunn shows that each school refines and adapts this American cultural wisdom in its own distinct way—reflecting the sensibilities and concerns of the people who inhabit each school. While one school fosters the belief that effort is all it takes to succeed, another fosters the belief that hard work will only get you so far because you have to be smart enough to master course concepts. Ultimately, Nunn argues that these school-level adaptations of cultural ideas about success become invisible advantages and disadvantages for students’ college-going futures. Some schools’ definitions of success match seamlessly with elite college admissions’ definition of the ideal college applicant, while others more closely align with the expectations of middle or low-tier institutions of higher education.With its insights into the transmission of ideas of success from society to school to student, this provocative work should prompt a reevaluation of the culture of secondary education. Only with a thorough understanding of this process will we ever find more consistent means of inculcating success, by any measure.