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Latino Ethnic Consciousness: The Case of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans in Chicago download epub

by Felix M. Padilla


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Latino Ethnic Consciousness book.

Latino Ethnic Consciousness book. Focusing on Mexican-American and Puerto Rican populations in Chicago, Latino Ethnic Consciousness documents the development of the a collective Hispanic or Latino ethnic identity, distinct and separate from the national and cultural affiliations of Spanish-speaking groups.

Felix M. Padilla's contribution to the growing body of literature on Latino/Hispanic identity in the United . Padilla's contribution to the growing body of literature on Latino/Hispanic identity in the United States represents a significant departure from the way most social scientists have approached their analysis of ethnic identity and consciousness.

Padilla, Felix M. Latino Ethnic Consciousness: The Case of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans in Chicago. Notre Dame, Ind: University of Notre Dame Press, 1985. a b c Price, Patricia L. "Cohering Culture on Calle Ocho: The Pause and Flow of Latinidad. Globalizations . (2007): 81–99. Dávila, Arlene M. Latinos, In. The Marketing and Making of a People. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2001.

Latino ethnic consciousness: The case of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans in Chicago. The Journal of Latin American Anthropology 8 (2): 96–125. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Indiana: University of Notre Dame. Puertorriquenas rencorosas y mejicanas sufridas: Gendered Ethnic Identity Formation in Chicago's Latino Communities.

Studies of Mexican and Puerto Rican communities living in the same . The Color of Citizenship: Race, Modernity and Latin American/Hispanic Political Thought.

However, few studies have examined MexiRican individuals, those who have one Mexican and one Puerto Rican parent and who experience both cultures and dialects in their homes. New York: NYU Press, 2003. Miguel, Guadalupe San. "Embracing Latinidad: Beyond Nationalism in the History of Education. Journal of Latinos & Education 1. (2011): 3-22. Price, Patricia L.

Padilla, Felix M. 1985. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press. University of Notre Dame Press cop. Saved in: Physical Description.

Readings : 1) Félix Padilla, Latino Ethnic Consciousness: The Case of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans in Chicago .

Readings : 1) Félix Padilla, Latino Ethnic Consciousness: The Case of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans in Chicago (University fo Notre Dame Press, 1985), chaps. 2 and 5. 2) Martha Jímenez, ". Ethnic Politics: Implications for Latin Americans," Latin American Perspectives vol. 19, no 4 (Fall 1992), pp. 7-17. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time. Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern.

Focusing on Mexican-American and Puerto Rican populations in Chicago, Latino Ethnic Consciousness documents the development of the a collective Hispanic or Latino ethnic identity, distinct and separate from the national and cultural affiliations of Spanish-speaking groups. Author Felix Padilla explores the internal dynamics and external conditions, which have prompted this move past individual group boundaries to a broader ethnic identity. According to Padilla, the Latino ethnic identity develops from the cultural and structural similarities of two or more Spanish-speaking groups and often in response to common experiences of social inequality. In that ethnic identities have to a large extent been encouraged by the division of the labor market in America's industrial society, he argues that the Latino consciousness represents a situational ethnic identity which functions according to the needs of the groups. He describes how such conditions as poverty and racial discrimination have necessitated the assertion of a broader Latino ethnic consciousness and behavior, often more successful in social action than individual cultural or national associations. In case studies from the early 70s, Padilla examines Affirmative Action, the Spanish Coalition for Jobs―spurred by activist Hector Franco―and the Latino Institute, and their influence on the growth of Latino solidarity and mobilization in Chicago. In refining the concept of Latino and Hispanic and establishing its significance in society, Latino Ethnic Consciousness serves as an analytic framework for further study of ethnic change in America.

Comments: (2)

Ericaz
This is a good book.It is an interesting read.it is well written book.it is scholarly and informative.I would recommend it
Barinirm
Felix Padilla's 1985 classic stands as the first and,even today, one of the few social science studies on the dynamics and formation of a pan-Latino ethnic identity. Padilla's study is set in Chicago and examines the structural conditions and social inequalities endured by Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the Windy City throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s; these inequities fostered the emergence of a new Latino ethnic identity and mobilization in the 1970s that transcended individual Mexican and Puerto Rican identity.

Padilla contends that a pan-ethnic Latino identity emerges when two or more Spanish-speaking ancestry populations are confronted with similar social conditions (such as poverty, discrimination, or poor educational facilities). Such conditions may serve as a basis for solidarity and unity between two or more Spanish-speaking groups (in this case Chicanos and Boricuas) as they unite to seek redress for such grievances. As the old saying goes, "there is strength in numbers."

Padilla points out that there are two basic models of Latinismo: the ascribed model and the emergent model. The ascribed model seeks ethnicity as a primordial category; Latinos constitute an a priori ethnic group based on Spanish as a cultural commonality. On the other hand, the emergent model and its adherents see Latino pan-ethnicity as a socially constructed concept that arises when Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, etc unite in efforts to challenge systematic inequalities that they face. Padilla clearly favors the emergent model, although he does not totally discard the ascribed framework - pointing out that many "Latinos" cherish Spanish as a key element of symbolic ethnicity.

Padilla does a great job in detailing the emergence of a pan-Latino ethnic identity among Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in Chicago during the 1970s. The move towards a pan-Latino identity originated in the early 1970s when Mexicans and Puerto Ricans unitied to challenge discrimination in Chicago's white collar employment sector. Federal affirmative action policy enhanced efforts towards pan-Latino unity as it legitimized and confirmed claims of inequality and discrimination. The sucess of early efforts in opening up new job opportunities for Mexicans and Puerto Ricans was taken as proof that pan-Latino unity held promise in fighting racial and ethnic discrimination.

Padilla's book is important because, all too often, larger American society uses the label "Latino" indiscriminately - implying that Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, etc. are automatically a unified, homogenous group. Nothing could be further from the truth. A homogenous "Latino" culture does not exist, cultural differences and differences in historical experiences mark each group that is encompassed under the rubric of "Latino." Examing the experiences and social history of, for example, Puerto Ricans and labeling it as "Latino culture" or "Latino history" is misleading and a misnomer, as Puerto Rican experience in the United States is vastly different from Cuban experiences and Chicano experiences. Padilla argues that social scientists and the media must stop using the label "Latino" indiscriminately and realize that this pan-ethnic label is a political phenomenon that denotes a conscious attempt at inter-group unity to achieve a collective goal. As such, scholars should dedicate themselves to investigating the factors and conditions that serve to promote attempts at "Latino" unity.

I strongly suggest reading this book in conjunction with "Latino Crossings" by Nicholas DeGenova and Ana Ramos-Zayas. While Padilla focuses on the conditions that foster pan-Latino unity, DeGenova and Ramos-Zayas examine factors that impede and prevent such unity (inter-group prejudice and stereotypes being the main culprit to such efforts).
Latino Ethnic Consciousness: The Case of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans in Chicago download epub
Social Sciences
Author: Felix M. Padilla
ISBN: 026801275X
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: University of Notre Dame Press; 1st edition (October 31, 1995)
Pages: 198 pages