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Carry Me Home: Birmingham Alabama The Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution download epub

by Diane McWhorter


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Diane McWhorter sees Birmingham, Alabama, in just this way. And she tells the story of it that most of us want to hear . It's easily one of the best books I have read about the Civil Rights struggle

Diane McWhorter sees Birmingham, Alabama, in just this way. And she tells the story of it that most of us want to hear, that of the former lover, who still has some affection. It's easily one of the best books I have read about the Civil Rights struggle. McWhorter was a 5th grader in Birmingham, AL the year Birmingham was the focus of the struggle - in one of the leading families there (in a middle class branch).

Diane McWhorter, daughter of a prominent Birmingham family, weaves together police and FBI records .

Diane McWhorter, daughter of a prominent Birmingham family, weaves together police and FBI records, archival documents, interviews with black activists and Klansmen, and personal memories into an extraordinary narrative of the personalities and events that brought about America’s second emancipation. The Year of Birmingham," 1963, was a cataclysmic turning point in America’s long civil rights struggle.

Diane McWhorter, the daughter of a prominent white Birmingham family, brilliantly captures the opposing sides in this struggle for racial justice. Tracing the roots of the civil rights movement to the Old Left and its efforts to organize labor in the 1930s, Carry Me Home shows that the movement was a waning force in desperate need of a victory by the time King arrived in Birmingham

Carry Me Home: Birmingham, Alabama, the Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution, written by Diane McWhorter and published by Simon & Schuster in 2001.

Carry Me Home: Birmingham, Alabama, the Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution, written by Diane McWhorter and published by Simon & Schuster in 2001, won the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize and the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction. McWhorter grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, and recounts being about the same age as the girls killed in the September 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church, though she "was growing up on the wrong side of the revolution".

In Carry Me Home, McWhorter returns to Birmingham in 1963, the site of civil rights demonstrations met with brutal resistance by law enforcement and the bombing of a historic black church that left four innocent black girls dead under the rubble. After Birmingham, segregation, America’s version of apartheid, became unsustainable. McWhorter tells the story of Birmingham in compelling and, at times shocking, detail.

Diane McWhorter is a long-time contributor to The New York Times and the op-ed page of USA TODAY, among other national publications. Her young adult history of the civil rights movement is A Dream of Freedom

Diane McWhorter is a long-time contributor to The New York Times and the op-ed page of USA TODAY, among other national publications. Her young adult history of the civil rights movement is A Dream of Freedom. She is originally from Birmingham, Alabama, and now lives in New York City.

McWhorter admires the civil rights workers, and she clearly believes that Fred .

McWhorter admires the civil rights workers, and she clearly believes that Fred Shuttlesworth and the other locals struggling to make a go of a movement for social justice in perhaps the least receptive city in America for such a movement are heroes, but they still seem to revolve around the constellation of white Birmingham throughout the book rather than the other way around.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Child demonstrators faced down police dogs and fire hoses in huge nonviolent marches against segregation.

McWhorter grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, and .

McWhorter grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, and recounts being about the same age as the girls killed in the September 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church, though she "was growing up on the wrong side of the revolution"  .


Comments: (7)

skyjettttt
The soul of Alabama, or any such essence, may be forever unknowable. The glimpses we catch here and there of Alabama are in high relief and are perhaps most misleading, or maybe most deeply significant. From the failure to condemn Judge Roy Moore, to the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, to the removal of all its Native Americans, to the brutal oppression of labor by the Birmingham Steel industry, to the cult-like status of Alabama football, to the posturing of George Wallace, we are given dramatic, almost grotesque visions of the nature of the place. Perhaps it can hardly be that bad.

I have often believed that the best insights into a soul can come from an ex-lover. For good or ill, the opinion of someone who was once too deeply involved to ever be a credible judge in the moment, but who gains some objectivity (from time and distance) with which to analyze those more profound, recondite, deeply felt, and ineffable elements of that which they once loved, may be the best one and most reliable one. Diane McWhorter sees Birmingham, Alabama, in just this way. And she tells the story of it that most of us want to hear, that of the former lover, who still has some affection.

This may be most apparent in the Afterward, in which she deftly describes the experience of attending the trial of some of those church bombers, decades after the fact, and after many of he goals of the Civil Rights Movement have taken hold. All the parties involved appear to treat the event as a family reunion, despite the brutality of the earlier conflict, and the depth of the fear and hatred that marked the sides in the battle. There is a capacity for spontaneous myth making that I believe exists in the Southern heart, and she better than any writer has a sense for this.

I urge you to read “Carry Me Home,” by Diane McWhorter, not only to learn the incredible details of this microcosm of the larger Civil Rights Movement, but also to have someone hold your hand while you wander among the bombings, the Klan rallies, the oppression, and the hatred. Amidst this apparent inhumanity, she never lets you lose sight of the humanity of the participants. She also casually lifts the curtain from much of what has been overvalued by more glossy histories, the Kennedys, Dr. King, the Movement itself. You will find this book gripping, evocative, well written, insightful, exhaustively researched, and charming.

You will also feel like you are part of the family, because that is what Ms. McWhorter conveys. You are never removed from the events of the text. And as you gain insights into her journey to the unreachable soul of mid-twentieth century Alabama, you will get the uneasy feeling that you are also looking at the shadows of current, modern America.
TheFresh
As a southerner and as a fellow student at the Monterey Defense Language Institute in 1965 with FBI agents being reassigned from their stint in Birmingham Alabama I have personal connections to Diane McWhorter incredible story of the breaking of Jim Crow in the years she covers by what came to be call the Civil Rights Movement. J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI was a mar on our history along with other law enforcing agencies, local state and federal as Ms McWhorter well reveals. It is part of her tale.
Until I saw that she has spend 19 years on intense research it was impossible to imagine she might have acquired the detail interactions of the participants in that drama. The out standing actor is Fred Shuttlesworth and on my reading that at the entrance to his final resting place, “at the wooded entrance to the historic downtown graveyard, a giant American flag swelled from the extended ladder of a Birmingham fire truck,” I could not suppress a thunderous sob.

Who might look forward to reading Carry Me Home, very few I suspect. It lays open a grotesque sore of American History and the author’s technique of laying down detain, hour by hour day by day, is trying to any reader; take it in small doses but persist for there is pleasure in knowing that for almost all Americans today North and South that sore was well lanced by Shuttlesworth and his better known assistances’; we are healthier people for it. But healthier is not synonymous with well as McWhorter goes on to show discussing more current Birmingham Alabama and American events.

The author’s sections entitled ‘McWhorter’ goes a long way towards explaining motivation for the book, as father and family holds a role as racist, if not bomber.
Yramede
This book is a study of the history of race relations in Birmingham, Alabama from late 1930s to 1963, the year of the bombing of Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. McWhorter provides a comprehensive account of the story of the Pittsburgh of the South. As she presents, resistance to integration was not only the view of the extreme fringe of the white community, but also a nuanced consensus that linked the gentlemen in country clubs and humbler working class families together. The vestige of white supremacy, still largely intact in the older generation, should be embraced but not intentionally ignored. The solid work is a cornerstone of the plethora of literature on the civil rights movement. Prior knowledge is preferable as the author gives a lot of details on local actors and minor events.
Dranar
It's easily one of the best books I have read about the Civil Rights struggle. McWhorter was a 5th grader in Birmingham, AL the year Birmingham was the focus of the struggle - in one of the leading families there (in a middle class branch). That impacts her writing, not that she heard any of it at the time, but that she knows the culture of the rich who controlled the town. And that drives her in to detail that I think an outside historian would never get.

I read in numerous books how Birmingham was the city of hate. And how the children marching was key to the shift in people's views that led to civil rights. But this explained why.

With the focus on Birmingham you see the South in detail and how the culture, the local politics, and the specific people impacted and eventually shifted the world. It also paints a complete picture of the key people involved which adds so much.

I was reading until I couldn't keep my eyes open any longer at night. And then back to reading the first thing the next morning. Incredibly well written.
Carry Me Home: Birmingham Alabama The Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution download epub
Social Sciences
Author: Diane McWhorter
ISBN: 0965251616
Category: Politics & Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Publisher: Touchstone; First Printing edition (2001)