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Oxford Bookworms Library: Level Two The Pit and the Pendulum and Other Stories download epub

by Edgar Allan Poe


Epub Book: 1964 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1605 kb.

A level 2 Oxford Bookworms Library graded reader. Retold for Learners of English by John Escott. Death is all around you, waiting.

A level 2 Oxford Bookworms Library graded reader. Everybody has bad dreams. Horrible things move towards you in the dark, things you can hear but not see. Then you wake up, in your own warm bed, and turn over to go back to sleep. But imagine that you wake up on a hard floor, in a darkness blacker than the blackest night. You listen to the silence, and smell a wet dead smell. In these stories by Edgar Allan Poe, death whispers at you from every dark corner, and fear can send you mad. View all. Book 2. Book 3.

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Oxford Bookworms Library:. has been added to your Cart. Edgar was the second of three children

A level 2 Oxford Bookworms Library graded reader. Edgar was the second of three children. His other brother William Henry Leonard Poe would also become a poet before his early death, and Poe’s sister Rosalie Poe would grow up to teach penmanship at a Richmond girls’ school. Within three years of Poe’s birth both of his parents had died, and he was taken in by the wealthy tobacco merchant John Allan and his wife Frances Valentine Allan in Richmond, Virginia while Poe’s siblings went to live with other families.

Edgar Allan Poe, John Escott. David R. Hill, Director of the Edinburgh Project on Extensive Reading.

In these stories by Edgar Allan Poe, death whispers at you from every .

In these stories by Edgar Allan Poe, death whispers at you from every dark corner, and fear can send you ma. .Oxford Bookworms Library Level 2. Graded readers for secondary and adult learners. Product Information Teaching Resources Learning Resources. For more ways of using Bookworms in and out of class watch the Oxford Big Read step-by-step video tips with downloadable worksheets. Why read? Find out about the benefits of reading with these blogs.

The complete, unabridged text of The Pit and the Pendulum by Edgar . My cognizance of the pit had become known to the inquisitorial agents - the pit whose horrors had been destined for so bold a recusant a.

The complete, unabridged text of The Pit and the Pendulum by Edgar Allan Poe, with vocabulary words and definitions. In other conditions of mind I might have had courage to end my misery at once by a plunge into one of these abysses; but now I was the veriest of cowards. Neither could I forget what I had read of these pits - that the sudden extinction of life formed no part of their most horrible plan. My cognizance of the pit had become known to the inquisitorial agents - the pit whose horrors had been destined for so bold a recusant as myself - the pit, typical of hell, and regarded by rumor as the Ultima Thule of all their punishments.

Everybody has bad dreams. Horrible things move towards you in the dark, things you can hear but not see. Then you wake up, in your own warm bed, and turn over to go back to sleep. But imagine that you wake up on a hard floor, in a darkness blacker than the blackest night. You listen to the silence, and smell a wet dead smell. Death is all around you, waiting... In these stories by Edgar Allan Poe, death whispers at you from every dark corner, and fear can send you mad...

Comments: (7)

Chuynopana
100% Awesome edition!
Sharpbinder
Please be more specific about what you are selling. I was expecting a book not a cassette tape. I would've even been happy with a CD but not this.
Utchanat
I checked out this book, along with several others, from my local library so I could "get my Poe on" before Halloween, and was so impressed with the wonderful color illustrations on almost every page. It contains a small but decent representation of Poe favorites. The copy that I bought cost me less than a dollar (plus the $3.99 S&H) and happened to be a library edition, so it is bound very nicely! Also it arrived promptly, despite the weather issues going on across the country. Count me as 100% satisfied.
Manarius
At age 12 I was given my introduction to the world of literature by my mother who read me Poe's The Pit and the Pendulum. I can still vividly recollect living through the horrors of the chamber with the unnamed narrator, wondering why Christian monks would construct such a room and why Christian monks would inflict such torture. I still wrestle with a number of the story's themes.

Sadism
Why do such a thing? The story's torture chamber is not a makeshift construction slapped together; rather, with its pendulum descending in mathematical precision and its collapsing metal walls turning red hot, to assemble such a bizarre, intricate room would take sophisticated engineering. huge resources and lots of time, perhaps years. What does such a room say about the Western monastic tradition and the mentality of monks?

In `A Distant Mirror, The Calamitous 14th Century", author Barbara W. Tuchman richly portrays the psychology of these chaotic, disorderly times. For example, she writes, "In village games, players with hands tied behind them competed to kill a cat nailed to a post by battering it to death with their heads, at the risk of cheeks ripped open or eyes scratched out by the frantic animal's claws. Trumpets enhanced the excitement. Or a pig enclosed in a wide pen was chased by men with clubs to the laughter of spectators as he ran squealing from the blows until beaten lifeless. Accustomed in their own lives to physical hardship and injury, medieval men and women were not necessarily repelled by the spectacle of pain but rather enjoyed it. . . . It may be that the untender medieval infancy produced adults who valued others no more than they had been valued in their own formative years." Nowadays, we have a name for "untender infancy": child abuse. We also have a word for enjoying the spectacle of pain inflicted on others: sadism.

Of course, the effects of child abuse and living in a society accepting sadism as the norm would not disappear when men became monks. What undoubtedly added fuel to this psychological fire was a religion and theology giving a central place to guilt and sin and thus turning men against their own bodies, and, more specifically, again their own sexuality. Reaching absolute conclusions about the mindset of peoples living centuries ago can never be an exact science, but it doesn't take too much imagination to understand how such a life in such a time would produce a population of dark, twisted people. Poe's tale takes place in 1820s not the 1350s, but how much did the psychology of the monasteries really change in these years?

Altered States of Consciousness
In the beginning stages of the narrator's ordeal, he conveys the following, "Very suddenly there came back to my soul motion and sound - the tumultuous motion of the heart, and, in my ears, the sound of its beating. Then a pause in which all is blank. Then again sound, and motion and touch - a tingling sensation pervading my frame. Then the mere consciousness of existence, without thought - a condition which lasted long." Yogis and Buddhist teachers talk about the `consciousness of existence, without thought', that is, the gap between thoughts. In such a gap between thoughts we are given a glimpse of the ground of being, pure awareness of space. This awareness can be developed through meditation or occasionally experienced through such things as hallucinogens, trance, or, as with the narrator of Poe's tale, extreme emotional states.

Fear
Adding to the fear of actual physical suffering, there is the fear we project with our minds and imaginations. The narrator's imagination is afire: "And now, as I still continued to step cautiously onward, there came thronging upon my recollection a thousand vague rumors of the horrors of Toledo. Of the dungeons there had been strange things narrated - fables I had always deemed them - but yet strange and too ghastly to repeat, save in a whisper. Was I left to perish of starvation in this subterranean world of darkness; or what fate, perhaps even more fearful, awaited me?" Fear thrives on our projecting into the future: whatever pain or agony we are currently experiencing, there is always the ever-present possibility our plight will become worse.

Hope and Good Fortune
The narrator is forever hopeful and it's the narrator's hope coupled with his fear and sufferings that gives the tale its emotional depth and breath . And, as it turns out, good fortune or what we more commonly call `luck' follows the narrator at three critical junctures in the tale. Oh, Fortuna, if we could all have such good fortune and luck at critical points in our own lives!
Damdyagab
Chelsea Hall

October 13, 2005

This year I read The Pit and the Pendulum, by Edgar Allen Poe. It's about a guy who is captured and tortured by a pendulum, but shortly after is thrown into an abyss. My favorite artist, Griss Grimly makes drawings from Poe's stories. So since I love Griss so much I decided to check Poe out. I'd recommend this story to any one who likes Griss Grimly's art who is over the age of thirteen. If you don't like guar, crazy, magical, scary, mystery books you wouldn't like this story, but if you do like everything I said you like this book.

This book was wonderful because of all the torture. The guy in this book was hearing people that really weren't there. For example he said "I saw the lips of the black robed judges. They appeared white whiter then this sheet upon which I write these words and thin even grotesquely. Also another scary moment in this story is when the pendulum gets closer and closer to his rob, it was very suspenseful. It said "down steadily down it crept. Down certainly, relentlessly down". The only thing wrong was it was a little hard to understand. Like "it enveloped my limbs and body close in all directions, save in the path of the destroying crescent".

My over all opinion was a wonderful experience. It was fun and not boring, unlike all the other books I've read. Anyone looking for horror stories, which love terror scary and fun you will like this book.
Uranneavo
Waking up in darkness, fearing a live burial; groping in the darkness almost falling into a pit; bound to a framework under a swinging pendulum while rats rush for their midnight snack; sizzling iron walls squeezing together, but not to cook hamburgers. These could be scenes from Indiana Jones and the Dungeons of Toledo. And yet, The Pit and the Pendulum is classic Poe: heart throbbing, adrenaline rushing, spine tinkling and hair raising suspense and terror. The story triumphs not only through its content but also its form; the words and sentences, like spectral needles and blades, pierce memory and imagination to engrave a tangy nightmare. Yes, before Stephen King, there was Edgar Allan Poe. Bon appetite!
MeGa_NunC
I thought this short story was very good! It is about a man(with an unknown name) that is sent to the spanish inquisistion and is stuck there for many nights. One night he later awakes and is awoken by a swinging pendulum coming down to slice him. The only way out is through a never ending pit or to be killed by a spiked pendulum...which way will he choose...read it and you will find out!
I am sure all the words are in there but low quality print. They make it look like a penguin classic but don't be mistaken.
Oxford Bookworms Library: Level Two The Pit and the Pendulum and Other Stories download epub
Foreign Language Study & Reference
Author: Edgar Allan Poe
ISBN: 0194233081
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Foreign Language Study & Reference
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press (December 1, 2005)
Pages: 56 pages