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The double helix: A personal account of the discovery of the structure of DNA (A Norton critical edition) download epub

by James D Watson


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James D. Watson, together with Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1962. This is an interesting look into the discover of the structure of DNA.

James D. He is Chancellor Emeritus of the Watson School of Biological Sciences at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. It is offered by only one of two people who were part of that discovery and it is a very candid assessment that reveals what it was like in real time. Watson went on to win the nobel prize for the discovery and it is the foundation of world changing advancements, which still are in their infancy.

molecular biologist, geneticist and zoologist, best known as one of the co-discoverers of the structure of DNA in 1953 with Francis Crick.

This approach does, however, result in a notorious portrayal of "Rosy" (whose X-rays were vital to the Cambridge duo's breakthrough) as an intimidating dragon, and the book is regularly held up as evidence in condemnations of sexism in science. Science and nature books.

The Double Helix book. The path to discovering the structure of DNA is of course fascinating, but Watson’s charming prose and thrilling narrative adds drama to the history. Watson’s writing style has that English charm, which is unique for an American. He often refers to his ignorance on certain scientific principles and his physical unattractiveness to perhaps gain sympathy for appropriating other’s work.

Watson, James . 1928-, DNA, Genetic code, Molecular biology. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

By identifying the structure of DNA, the molecule of life, Francis Crick and James Watson revolutionized biochemistry and won themselves a Nobel Prize. At the time, Watson was only twenty-four, a young scientist hungry to make his mark

By identifying the structure of DNA, the molecule of life, Francis Crick and James Watson revolutionized biochemistry and won themselves a Nobel Prize. At the time, Watson was only twenty-four, a young scientist hungry to make his mark.

This book is the 27th greatest Nonfiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks. Though it was originally slated to be published by Harvard University Press, Watson's home university dropped the arrangement after protestations from Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins, co-discoverers of the structure of DNA, and it was published privately.

Background materials include reproductions of the original scientific papers in which the double helical structure of DNA was first presented in 1953 and 1954

By identifying the structure of DNA, the molecule of life, Francis Crick and James Watson revolutionized biochemistry and won themselves a Nobel Prize.


Comments: (7)

Perius
We are in 1968, Watson is telling us how he and his friend Crick managed to figured out the pretty DNA structure. He is entertaining while speaking his mind sharing all the trouble to get the model done. The whole thing is knitted together with bits of his social life and impressions on Copenhagen and Cambridge. Sometimes it feels like a journal written by a 25 years old rebel eager to crack the secrets of life and to experience it to the hilt. Crick’s "What mad pursuit" complements this book beautifully. But not as pretty as DNA.
Weetont
Recently I was asked to do a short paper on military innovation for a conference to be held in South Korea. Having read somewhere that this is the best book on how scientific discoveries are made, I bought it and read it from cover to cover. Even though much of the science is above my head. Much of the book is devoted to backbiting aimed at Prof. Watson's associates. Including the most important one among them, Francis Crick. In other ways, though, it provides a vivid picture of the politics, intrigues, frustrations, and joys of doing research. I also found the descriptions of grantmanship and life at Cambridge, England, during the early 1950s interesting.

All in all a good read, though not the spectacular one I thought it would be.
Whitebinder
"The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of The Structure of DNA", James D. Watson, Simon & Shuster, NY 1968/2001. ISBN-13: 978-0-7432-1630-2, PB 226 pages, 20 B/W Photos & 11 Diagrams, plus 3 pg. Foreword by Sir L. Bragg & 4 pg. Intro. by S. Nasar. 8 1/2" x 5 1/2".

Written by Dr. James D. Watson in 1968, reprinted several times, this is one of the most intriguing, personal stories of scientific endeavors written to unravel the molecular basis of heredity and the genetic code of life itself, the DNA molecule - deservingly referenced as the Holy Grail of scientific inqiry. With an explanatory apology, Watson describes his maturation from an initial lazy undergraduate at Univ. of Chicago having primary interest in ornithology and avoiding chemistry and physics courses,to doing post-doctoral research abroad, first in Copenhagen and subsequently in Cambridge where he began serious research with Francis Crick that culminated in elucidating the molecular structure of the double helix DNA molecule with base-pairing of A-T and G-C, allowing a model construct possessing correspondence to its X-ray crystalline lattice structure. Much of the time it appeared to a 'Mission Impossible'. Success came in 1953, Watson was then 25 years old.

The author's prose and pace of relating this story reveals the passion of his quest to establish his mark in science - and he relates intimate anecdotes of his cohorts, teachers and the scientific cult of divisions enjoyed by the scholarly, erudite academicians in England and elsewhere. In the end, he shared along with his associate Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins, the Nobel Prize in 1962. The future of medicine was forever changed. The book is a compelling, refrehing read for anyone with a modicum of curiosity - a science background is not essential.
Kamuro
This firsthand account of the discovery of DNA dispels a lot of the notions that ousiders have about how science really works. Watson's descriptions of the competition, politics, dead ends, personality clashes, mistakes, and eventually inspiration reveal that discovery is not as clear-cut a process as it sometimes might seem.
Watson is honest in his introduction that his account is just that, the story told through his own point of view, complete with possible faulty memories and personal prejudices. I was intrigued by the portrayals of the personalities of so many famous figures that I've been learning about for years in my biology and genetics classes - Francis Crick, of course, along with Maurice Wilikins, Rosalind Franklin, Linus Pauling, and many more. I was touched by Watson's admission at the end of the book that his unfavorable impressions of Rosalind Franklin stemmed from the fact that she was a woman trying to make a name for herself in the male-dominated world of scientific research in the 1950s.
There is quite a bit of biological jargon in this book, and though it could probably be read by someone without any knowledge of genetics, it will be appreciated more by readers with some background. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone with an interest in genetics and science.
Mohn
Wonderful book if you're interested in how the mind of a scientist works. Considering the immense importance of discovery of the double helix, it should be required reading for anyone interested in evolution. A bit heavy on the chemistry side but just pass over it as you read. It's the personality revelations that are truly enlightening.
The double helix: A personal account of the discovery of the structure of DNA (A Norton critical edition) download epub
Author: James D Watson
ISBN: 039301245X
Category: Reference
Language: English
Publisher: Norton; 1st edition (1980)
Pages: 298 pages